Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Standard grep/pcregrep etc. can conveniently be used with binary files for ASCII or UTF8 data - is there a simple way to make them try UTF16 too (preferably simultaneously, but instead will do)?

Data I'm trying to get is all ASCII anyway (references in libraries etc.), it just doesn't get found as sometimes there's 00 between any two characters, and sometimes there isn't.

I don't see any way to get it done semantically, but these 00s should do the trick, except I cannot easily use them on command line.

share|improve this question
    
...it's not ASCII if the characters are two bytes long. –  Matti Virkkunen Sep 20 '10 at 15:28
    
I mean ASCII range of characters (U+0000 to U+007F), not ASCII encoding. –  taw Sep 20 '10 at 20:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to just convert the text file to utf-8 and pipe that to grep:

iconv -f utf-16 -t utf-8 file.txt | grep query

I tried to do the opposite (convert my query to utf-16) but it seems as though grep doesn't like that. I think it might have to do with endianness, but I'm not sure.

It seems as though grep will convert a query that is utf-16 to utf-8/ascii. Here is what I tried:

grep `echo -n query | iconv -f utf-8 -t utf-16 | sed 's/..//'` test.txt

If test.txt is a utf-16 file this won't work, but it does work if test.txt is ascii. I can only conclude that grep is converting my query to ascii.

EDIT: Here's a really really crazy one that kind of works but doesn't give you very much useful info:

hexdump -e '/1 "%02x"' test.txt | grep -P `echo -n Test | iconv -f utf-8 -t utf-16 | sed 's/..//' | hexdump -e '/1 "%02x"'`

How does it work? Well it converts your file to hex (without any extra formatting that hexdump usually applies). It pipes that into grep. Grep is using a query that is constructed by echoing your query (without a newline) into iconv which converts it to utf-16. This is then piped into sed to remove the BOM (the first two bytes of a utf-16 file used to determine endianness). This is then piped into hexdump so that the query and the input are the same.

Unfortunately I think this will end up printing out the ENTIRE file if there is a single match. Also this won't work if the utf-16 in your binary file is stored in a different endianness than your machine.

EDIT2: Got it!!!!

grep -P `echo -n "Test" | iconv -f utf-8 -t utf-16 | sed 's/..//' | hexdump -e '/1 "x%02x"' | sed 's/x/\\\\x/g'` test.txt

This searches for the hex version of the string Test (in utf-16) in the file test.txt

share|improve this answer
    
iconv won't not work, as it's a binary file a lot of non-utf-16 data, and iconv exits on first error. –  taw Sep 24 '10 at 13:27
    
Ouch...I'm still looking into giving grep a utf-16 query out of curiosity (I don't think it's converting because it doesn't really know the encoding, it's gotta be doing something else weird) and I'll let you know if I come up with something. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Sep 24 '10 at 14:23
    
Check out my edit. Got something that works. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Sep 24 '10 at 15:58
    
It seems to be working after minor modification: pcregrep `echo -n "test" | iconv -f utf-8 -t utf-16le | hexdump -e '/1 "x%02x"' | sed 's/x/\\\\x/g'` <binary.file. Most importantly it doesn't require utf-16 characters to be on 2-byte boundary - something all previous methods had big problems with. Even works with -i. –  taw Sep 27 '10 at 7:39
    
Awesome! I discovered that the problem I was having was with the backticks. For some reason they return utf-8 strings, and escape the backslashes. This is why sed has four '\'s. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Sep 27 '10 at 14:11

I use this one all the time after dumping the Windows registry as its output is unicode. This is running under Cygwin.

$ regedit /e registry.data.out
$ file registry.data.out
registry.data.out: Little-endian **UTF-16 Unicode text**, with CRLF line terminators

$ sed 's/\x00//g' registry.data.out | egrep "192\.168"
"Port"="192.168.1.5"
"IPSubnetAddress"="192.168.189.0"
"IPSubnetAddress"="192.168.102.0"
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Print\Monitors\Standard TCP/IP Port\Ports\192.168.1.5]
"HostName"="192.168.1.5"
"Port"="192.168.1.5"
"LocationInformation"="http://192.168.1.28:1215/"
"LocationInformation"="http://192.168.1.5:80/WebServices/Device"
"LocationInformation"="http://192.168.1.5:80/WebServices/Device"
"StandaloneDhcpAddress"="192.168.173.1"
"ScopeAddressBackup"="192.168.137.1"
"ScopeAddress"="192.168.137.1"
"DhcpIPAddress"="192.168.1.24"
"DhcpServer"="192.168.1.1"
"0.0.0.0,0.0.0.0,192.168.1.1,-1"=""
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Monitors\Standard TCP/IP Port\Ports\192.168.1.5]
"HostName"="192.168.1.5"
"Port"="192.168.1.5"
"LocationInformation"="http://192.168.1.28:1215/"
"LocationInformation"="http://192.168.1.5:80/WebServices/Device"
"LocationInformation"="http://192.168.1.5:80/WebServices/Device"
"StandaloneDhcpAddress"="192.168.173.1"
"ScopeAddressBackup"="192.168.137.1"
"ScopeAddress"="192.168.137.1"
"DhcpIPAddress"="192.168.1.24"
"DhcpServer"="192.168.1.1"
"0.0.0.0,0.0.0.0,192.168.1.1,-1"=""
"MRU0"="192.168.16.93"
[HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-2054485685-3446499333-1556621121-1001\Software\Microsoft\Terminal Server Client\Servers\192.168.16.93]
"A"="192.168.1.23"
"B"="192.168.1.28"
"C"="192.168.1.200:5800"
"192.168.254.190::5901/extra"=hex:02,00
"00"="192.168.254.190:5901"
"ImagePrinterPort"="192.168.1.5"
share|improve this answer

The sed statement is more than I can wrap my head around. I have a simplistic, far-from-perfect TCL script that I think does an OK job with my test point of one:

#!/usr/bin/tclsh

set insearch [lindex $argv 0]

set search ""

for {set i 0} {$i<[string length $insearch]-1} {incr i} {
    set search "${search}[string range $insearch $i $i]."
}
set search "${search}[string range $insearch $i $i]"

for {set i 1} {$i<$argc} {incr i} {
    set file [lindex $argv $i]
    set status 0
    if {! [catch {exec grep -a $search $file} results options]} {
        puts "$file: $results"
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.