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Say I have a class like this:

@interface MyAwesomeClass : NSObject
{
@private
    NSString *thing1;
    NSString *thing2;
}
@property (retain) NSString *thing1;
@property (retain) NSString *thing2;
@end

@implementation MyAwesomeClass
@synthesize thing1, thing1;
@end

When accessing thing1 and thing2 internally (i.e, within the implementation of MyAwesomeClass), is it better to use the property, or just reference the instance variable directly (assuming cases in which we do not do any work in a "custom" access or mutator, i.e., we just set and get the variable). Pre-Objective C 2.0, we usually just access the ivars directly, but what's the usual coding style/best practice now? And does this recommendation change if an instance variable/property is private and not accessible outside of the class at all? Should you create a property for every ivar, even if they're private, or only for public-facing data? What if my app doesn't use key-value coding features (since KVC only fires for property access)?

I'm interested in looking beyond the low-level technical details. For example, given (sub-optimal) code like:

@interface MyAwesomeClass : NSObject
{
    id myObj;
}
@proprety id myObj;
@end

@implementation MyAwesomeClass
@synthesize myObj;
@end

I know that myObj = anotherObject is functionally the same as self.myObj = anotherObj.

But properties aren't merely fancy syntax for instructing the compiler to write accessors and mutators for you, of course; they're also a way to better encapsulate data, i.e., you can change the internal implementation of the class without rewriting classes that rely on those properties. I'm interested in answers that address the importance of this encapsulation issue when dealing with the class's own internal code. Furthermore, properly-written properties can fire KVC notifications, but direct ivar access won't; does this matter if my app isn't utilizing KVC features now, just in case it might in the future?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+100

I don't think any way is 'better'. You see both styles in common use, so there isn't even a usual/best practice now. In my experience, the style used has very little impact on how well I digest some implementation file I am looking. You certainly want to be comfortable with both styles (and any in between) when looking at other people's code.

Using a property for every internal ivar might be going slightly overboard, in terms of maintenance. I've done it, and it added a non-trivial amount of work that I don't think paid off for me. But if you have a strong desire/OCD for seeing consistent code like self.var everywhere, and you have it in the back of your mind every time you look at a class, then use it. Don't discount the effect that a nagging feeling can have on productivity.

Exceptions- Obviously, for custom getters (e.g. lazy creation), you don't have much of a choice. Also, I do create and use a property for internal setters when it makes it more convenient (e.g. setting objects with ownership semantics).

"just in case", "might" is not be a compelling reason to do something without more data, since the time required to implement it is non-zero. A better question might be, what is the probability that all the private ivars in some class will require KVC notifications in the future, but not now? For most of my own classes, the answer is exceedingly low, so I now avoid a hard rule about creating properties for every private ivar.

I've found that when dealing with internal implementations, I quickly get a good handle on how each ivar should be accessed regardless.

If you are interested, my own approach is this:

  • Reading ivars: Direct access, unless there is a custom getter (e.g. lazy creation)
  • Writing ivars: Directly in alloc/dealloc. Elsewhere, through a private property if one exists.
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If you spend time on the cocoa-dev mailing list, you'll find that this is a very contentious topic.

Some people think ivars should only ever be used internally and that properties should never (or rarely) be used except externally. There are various concerns with KVO notifications and accessor side effects.

Some people think that you should always (or mostly) use properties instead of ivars. The main advantage here is that your memory management is well contained inside of accessor methods instead of strewn across your implementation logic. The KVO notifications and accessor side effects can be overcome by creating separate properties that point to the same ivar.

Looking at Apple's sample code will reveal that they are all over the place on this topic. Some samples use properties internally, some use ivars.

I would say, in general, that this is a matter of taste and that there is no right way to do it. I myself use a mix of both styles.

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Thanks. You and Allen Ding both had especially good answers. –  mipadi Sep 30 '10 at 14:29
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The only difference in an assignment of thing1 = something; and self.thing1 = something; is that if you want to have the property assignment operation (retain, copy, etc), done on the assigned object, then you need to use a property. Assigning without properties will effectively be just that, assigning a reference to the provided object.

I think that defining a property for internal data is unnecessary. Only define properties for ivars that will be accessed often and need specific mutator behavior.

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If thing1 is used with KVO it is a good idea to use self.thing1= when you set it. If thing1 is @public, then it is best to assume that someone someday will sometime want to use it with KVO.

If thing1 has complex set semantics that you don't want to repeat everywhere you set it (for example retain, or non-nonatomic) then use through self.thing1= is a good idea.

If benchmarking shows that calling setThing1: is taking significant time then you might want to think about ways to set it without use of self.thing1= -- maybe note that it can not be KVO'ed, or see if manually implementing KVO is better (for example if you set it 3000 times in a loop somewhere, you might be able to set it via self->thing1 3000 times, and make 2 KVO calls about the value being about to change and having changed).

That leaves the case of a trivial setter on a private variable where you know you aren't using KVO. At that point it stops being a technical issue, and falls under code style. At least as long as the accessor doesn't show up as a bottleneck in the profiler. I tend to use direct ivar access at that point (unless I think I will KVO that value in the future, or might want to make it public and thus think others may want to KVO it).

However when I set things with direct ivar access I try to only do it via self->thing1=, that makes it a lot simpler to find them all and change them if I ever find the need to use KVO, or to make it public, or to make a more complex accessor.

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Other things mentioned here are all right on. A few things that the other answers missed are:

First, always keep in mind the implications of accessors/mutators being virtual (as all Objective-C methods are.) In general, it's been said that one should avoid calling virtual methods in init and dealloc, because you don't know what a subclass will do that could mess you up. For this reason, I generally try to access the iVars directly in init and dealloc, and access them through the accessor/mutators everywhere else. On the other hand, if you don't consistently use the accessors in all other places, subclasses that override them may be impacted.

Relatedly, atomicity guarantees of properties (i.e. your @properties are declared atomic) can't be maintained for anyone if you're accessing the iVar directly anywhere outside of init & dealloc. If you needed something to be atomic, don't throw away the atomicity by accessing the iVar directly. Similarly, if you don't need those guarantees, declare your property nonatomic (for performance.)

This also relates to the KVO issue. In init, no one can possibly be observing you yet (legitimately), and in dealloc, any remaining observer has a stale unretained (i.e. bogus) reference. The same reasoning also applies to the atomicity guarantees of properties. (i.e. how would concurrent accesses happen before init returns and accesses that happen during dealloc are inherently errors.)

If you mix and match direct and accessor/mutator use, you risk running afoul of not only KVO and atomicity, but of subclassers as well.

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