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Everyone,

here is a link to a small python app:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-skeleton.svg

I think I've correctly converted it. (Source at bottom of post)

But, the Math.Acos always returns NaN. Is there a difference between the python version of acos and Math.Acos?

    private Random rnd = new Random();
    private double scale = 5;
    private double radius = 10;
    private double beta1 = 1.1;
    private double beta2 = 0.9;
    private double theta1;
    private double theta2;

    private Point[] points = new Point[10];

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++ )
        {
            points[i] = new Point((rnd.NextDouble() * scale), 
                (rnd.NextDouble() * scale));
        }

        theta1 = Math.Asin(1/beta1);
        theta2 = Math.PI - Math.Asin(beta2);
    }

    private double Dot(Point p, Point q, Point r)
    {
        var pr = new Point();
        var qr = new Point();

        //(p[0]-r[0])
        pr.X = p.X-r.X;

        //(p[1]-r[1])
        pr.Y = p.Y-r.Y;

        //(q[0]-r[0])
        qr.X = q.X-r.X;

        //(q[1]-r[1])
        qr.Y = q.Y-r.Y;

        return (pr.X*qr.X) + (pr.Y*qr.Y);
    }

private double Sharp(Point p,Point q)
{
    double theta = 0;

    foreach(var pnt in points)
    {
        if(pnt!=p && pnt!=q)
        {
            var dotpq = Dot(p, q, pnt);
            double t = Math.Acos(dotpq);
            double u = Math.Pow((dotpq * dotpq), 0.5);

            var tempVal = t/u;

            theta = Math.Max(theta, tempVal);
        }
    }
    return theta;

}

    private void DrawPoint(Point p)
    {
        var e = new Ellipse
                    {
                        Width = radius/2,
                        Height = radius/2,
                        Stroke = Brushes.Red,
                        Visibility = Visibility.Visible
                    };

        Canvas.SetTop(e, p.Y + radius);
        Canvas.SetLeft(e, p.X + radius);

        MyCanvas.Children.Add(e);
    }

    private void DrawEdge1(Point p,Point q)
    {
        var l = new Line
                    {
                        X1 = p.X,
                        Y1 = p.Y,
                        X2 = q.X,
                        Y2 = q.Y,
                        Stroke = Brushes.Black,
                        Width = 1,
                        Visibility = Visibility.Visible
                    };

        MyCanvas.Children.Add(l);
    }

    private void DrawEdge2(Point p,Point q)
    {
        var l = new Line
                    {
                        X1 = p.X,
                        Y1 = p.Y,
                        X2 = q.X,
                        Y2 = q.Y,
                        Stroke = Brushes.Blue,
                        Width = 1,
                        Visibility = Visibility.Visible
                    };

        MyCanvas.Children.Add(l);
    }

    private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        foreach (var p in points)
        {
            foreach (var q in points)
            {
                var theta = Sharp(p, q);

                if(theta < theta1) DrawEdge1(p, q);
                else if(theta < theta2) DrawEdge2(p, q);

            }                
        }
    }       
share|improve this question
1  
Wondering why you call Dot(p, q, pnt) again after you assign it to dotpq? :) – Blam Sep 20 '10 at 17:44
2  
So really the question is either: Why does Math.Acos return NaN in C# for this evaluation OR Are the C# and Python implementations of Math.Acos equivalent or something ... – jcolebrand Sep 20 '10 at 17:44
    
Also: Return Value - An angle, θ, measured in radians, such that 0 ≤θ≤π -or- NaN if d < -1 or d > 1. ... what's dotpq's double value at that point? – jcolebrand Sep 20 '10 at 17:45
    
Blam - Sorry, trying to clean up the code. The original code called Dot 3 times. – saunderl Sep 20 '10 at 17:51
    
drachenstern - I have seen dotpq go greater than 5. I do not know what its value could be in Python. (because I do not know enough about Python to step into the code and run it) ... Hence the "I think I've correctly converted it" – saunderl Sep 20 '10 at 17:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you need to do to get the angle from the dot product is to take away the lengths before you acos.

What python has:

prq = acos(dot(p,q,r) / (dot(p,p,r)*dot(q,q,r))**0.5)

What you're doing is not dividing in the Acos, but dividing after.

so:

int r = pnt;
int ppr = Dot(p,p,r);
int qqr = Dot(q,q,r);
int pqr = Dot(p,q,r);

double u = Math.Acos(pqr / Math.Sqrt(ppr * qqr));

Of course change the variables, I was just trying to keep it similar to the python to help you understand :)

share|improve this answer
    
I am soooo stupid - stupid - stupid. Thank you Very much! – saunderl Sep 20 '10 at 19:02
    
@Saunderl ~ Not stupid. We all have to learn these things. Glad you got it sorted. – jcolebrand Sep 21 '10 at 14:11

I think it's due to your translation of the Python expression (dot(p,q,r) / (dot(p,p,r) * dot(q,q,r)) **0.5). Exponentiation in Python has one of the lowest operators precedency-wise, so the square-root is being taken of the subterm dot(p,q,r) / (dot(p,p,r) * dot(q,q,r)). In your C# version, when calculating the value of the double 'u', you're only taking the square-root of the product of the last two terms, i.e. the (dotpq * dotpq).

share|improve this answer
    
But the **0.5 comes after (ppr * qqr), so surely it would only be applied to that? And thinking logically about what his program is doing, applying to only ppr * qqr makes the most sense. – Blam Sep 20 '10 at 18:58
1  
No, without additional parentheses to override it, the Python expression is evaluated in this order (A / (B * C)) ** 0.5. See the Summary in the online Python documentation which shows that operator '/' has higher precedence than operator '**'. – martineau Sep 20 '10 at 19:20

The question really is what is the value of dotpq when the function gets called. It has to be a double value between -1 and 1 as stated in the docs.

share|improve this answer
    
I downloaded Python 2.7 and ran the app. I added: print(dot(p,q,r)) right above the call to acos. And yes, the python app handles numbers greater than 1 and less than -1 because the output from Dot ranges from less than 10 to greater than 20, from what I saw. So the question is now, how to do I get C# to behave like Python in this case? – saunderl Sep 20 '10 at 18:16

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