Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given time-series data, I want to find the best fitting logarithmic curve. What are good libraries for doing this in either Python or SQL?

Edit: Specifically, what I'm looking for is a library that can fit data resembling a sigmoid function, with upper and lower horizontal asymptotes.

share|improve this question
1  
Finding the best fitting logarithmic curve is not the same as logistic regression. Do you have a library for linear regression ? –  High Performance Mark Sep 20 '10 at 18:08
    
I see your point. I've used the standard linear regression functions in SQL (STDDEV,R2,SLOPE,etc) to find a best fitting line, so I thought the equivalent procedure using a logistic model would be called "logistic regression". I've found several sites that refer to regression to mean line-fitting, however, I've also found some sites using this term to actually mean classification. I'm not referring to classification. What would be the standard terminology for referring to line fitting using a logistic model? –  Cerin Sep 20 '10 at 18:29
    
what you are looking for may well be called 'logistic regression' but the fitted line will not be logarithmic but logistic. –  High Performance Mark Sep 20 '10 at 20:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your data were categorical, then you could use a logistic regression to fit the probabilities of belonging to a class (classification).

However, I understand you are trying to fit the data to a sigmoid curve, which means you just want to minimize the mean squared error of the fit.

I would redirect you to the SciPy function called scipy.optimize.leastsq: it is used to perform least squares fits.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I ended up using scipy.optimize.curve_fit, which seems to use a similar method. –  Cerin Sep 22 '10 at 12:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.