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I'm trying to insert a certain number of indentations before a string based on an items depth and I'm wondering if there is a way to return a string repeated X times. Example:

string indent = "---";
Console.WriteLine(indent.Repeat(0)); //would print nothing.
Console.WriteLine(indent.Repeat(1)); //would print "---".
Console.WriteLine(indent.Repeat(2)); //would print "------".
Console.WriteLine(indent.Repeat(3)); //would print "---------".
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marked as duplicate by chue x, rene, Chris Haas, Blackhole, Donal Fellows May 26 at 15:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
Not sure if this is applicable, but you might want to look at the IndentedTextWriter as well. –  Chris Shouts Sep 20 '10 at 19:09
    
It's not a duplicate, for what it's worth. This question is asking about a string; the other question is asking about a character. There's a difference -- different functions with different signatures for different use cases. –  Jim Raden Oct 21 at 18:19

10 Answers 10

up vote 145 down vote accepted

If you only intend to repeat the same character you can use the string constructor that accepts a char and the number of times to repeat it new String(char c, int count).

For example, to repeat a dash five times:

string result = new String('-', 5); // -----
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2  
Thanks for reminding me about this nice little feature. I think it was lost in the corner of my mind. –  Chris Shouts Sep 20 '10 at 19:18
2  
Awesome, i had no idea. –  Abe Miessler Sep 20 '10 at 19:30
11  
This is a very useful trick of C#, but the title of the question is asking about a string (not a char). The other answers below this one are actually answering the question, but are rated much lower. I'm not trying to disrespect Ahmad's answer, but I think either the title of this question should be changed (if the question is actually regarding characters) or the other answers really should be upvoted (and not this one). –  pghprogrammer4 Mar 13 '13 at 16:16
6  
@Ahmad As I said, I did not downvote because I don't think you provided good information, but because the information you provided is not relevant to answering the question as currently stated. Imagine if you were searching for a way to repeat strings (not chars) and when you get to the relevant question you have to scroll through several 'useful' tips to get to the actual answers to the question. If the downvote is offense to you, I can remove it. But do you see where I'm coming from? Am I totally off-base here? –  pghprogrammer4 Mar 13 '13 at 16:42
3  
@pghprogrammer4 IMHO, downvotes can be quite discouraging, and should only be used for harmful/misleading/truly_bad answers, that need a major change or should be deleted by their author. Answers exist because people are generous and wish to share what they know. Generally, these sites really on the encouragement of upvotes to bring useful answers to the top. –  ToolmakerSteve Mar 18 at 4:17

If you're using .NET 4.0, you could use string.Concat together with Enumerable.Repeat.

int N = 5; // or whatever
Console.WriteLine(string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(indent, N)));

Otherwise I'd go with something like Adam's answer.

The reason I generally wouldn't advise using Andrey's answer is simply that the ToArray() call introduces superfluous overhead that is avoided with the StringBuilder approach suggested by Adam. That said, at least it works without requiring .NET 4.0; and it's quick and easy (and isn't going to kill you if efficiency isn't too much of a concern).

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1  
This will work nicely with strings - like if you need to concat non-breaking spaces ( ). But I assume the string constructor will be fastest if you're dealing with a char... –  woodbase Sep 12 '12 at 11:52
public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string Repeat(this string input, int count)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        {
            StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(input.Length * count);

            for(int i = 0; i < count; i++) builder.Append(input);

            return builder.ToString();
        }

        return string.Empty;
    }
}
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Beat me to it, exactly what I was going to say. –  Will Eddins Sep 20 '10 at 19:07
2  
Might as well pass input.Length * count to the StringBuilder constructor, don't you think? –  Dan Tao Sep 20 '10 at 19:16
    
@Dan: Does seem like a good idea, doesn't it? –  Adam Robinson Sep 20 '10 at 19:27
    
And if you pass input.Length * count to the StringBuilder constructor, you could skip the StringBuilder altogether and create a char[] of the right size right away. –  dtb Sep 20 '10 at 19:27
    
@dtb: I'm curious why you'd want to do that. I can't imagine that it would be much (if any) faster than using a StringBuilder, and the code would be less transparent. –  Adam Robinson Sep 20 '10 at 19:40

Use String.PadLeft, if your desired string contains only a single char.

public static string Indent(int count, char pad)
{
    return String.Empty.PadLeft(count, pad);
}

Credit due here

share|improve this answer
    
KISS. What do we need StringBuilders and extensions for, anyway? This is a very simple problem. –  DOK Sep 20 '10 at 19:16
    
I dunno, this seems to solve the problem as phrased with some elegance. And btw, who are you calling 'S'? :-) –  Steve Townsend Sep 20 '10 at 19:20
3  
But isn't this really just a less obvious version of the string constructor that takes a char and an int? –  Dan Tao Sep 20 '10 at 19:26
    
It would look nicer with String.Empty instead of ""... otherwise, good solution ;) –  Thomas Levesque Sep 20 '10 at 19:26
    
@Dan - yes, that's clearly the best here. –  Steve Townsend Sep 20 '10 at 19:28

I would go for Dan Tao's answer, but if you're not using .NET 4.0 you can do something like that:

public static string Repeat(this string str, int count)
{
    return Enumerable.Repeat(str, count)
                     .Aggregate(
                        new StringBuilder(),
                        (sb, s) => sb.Append(s))
                     .ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is a beautiful snip-it of code. –  miltonb Aug 4 at 1:52
    
If I'll findthis snippet in my project, I'll wonder who's been violating the KISS and why ... nice otherwise –  Noctis Aug 12 at 5:24
        string indent = "---";
        string n = string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(indent, 1).ToArray());
        string n = string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(indent, 2).ToArray());
        string n = string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(indent, 3).ToArray());
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1  
@Adam: I guess you'd need to do that pre-.NET 4.0. –  Dan Tao Sep 20 '10 at 19:11

Another approach is to consider string as IEnumerable<char> and have a generic extension method which will multiply the items in a collection by the specified factor.

public static IEnumerable<T> Repeat<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int times)
{
    source = source.ToArray();
    return Enumerable.Range(0, times).SelectMany(_ => source);
}

So in your case:

string indent = "---";
var f = string.Concat(indent.Repeat(0)); //.NET 4 required
//or
var g = new string(indent.Repeat(5).ToArray());
share|improve this answer

Surprised nobody went old-school. I am not making any claims about this code, but just for fun:

public static string Repeat(this string @this, int count)
{
    var dest = new char[@this.Length * count];
    for (int i = 0; i < dest.Length; i += 1)
    {
        dest[i] = @this[i % @this.Length];
    }
    return new string(dest);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Obviously I left that in as a test for the astute reader :) Very astute, thanks. –  OlduwanSteve Oct 14 '13 at 15:37
    
There's nothing old-school about naming a parameter @this, that's always been a horrible idea :) –  Dave Jellison Nov 5 '13 at 5:12
2  
I prefer not to use keyword as variable names unless forced (such as @class = "something" when working with MVC because you need class referring to CSS but it's a keyword in C# (of course). This isn't just me talking, it's a general rule of thumb. Although it's certainly compilable code and legitimate, think about ease of reading and typing as well, both practical reasons. I'm very partial to using parameter names to describe what's happening first so Repeat(this string seed, int count) might be more illustrative imho. –  Dave Jellison Nov 7 '13 at 4:45
1  
Interesting, thanks. I think in this case you're probably right that @this is less descriptive than it could be. However in general I think it is quite common to be extending classes or interfaces where the only reasonable name for 'this' is rather generic. If you have a parameter called 'instance' or 'it' or 'str' (see MSDN) then what you probably meant is 'this'. –  OlduwanSteve Nov 7 '13 at 13:00
1  
I basically agree with you, but for the sake of argument... since I know more about the string I'm building I can do a marginally better job than StringBuilder. StringBuilder has to make a guess when it's allocating memory. Granted it's unlikely to matter in many scenarios, but somebody out there might be building an enormous number of repeated strings in parallel and be glad to gain a few clock cycles back :) –  OlduwanSteve Mar 18 at 11:37

You can create an ExtensionMethod to do that!

public static class StringExtension
{
  public static string Repeat(this string str, int count)
  {
    string ret = "";

    for (var x = 0; x < count; x++)
    {
      ret += str;
    }

    return ret;
  }
}

Or using @Dan Tao solution:

public static class StringExtension
{
  public static string Repeat(this string str, int count)
  {
    if (count == 0)
      return "";

    return string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(indent, N))
  }
}
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3  
See my comment to Kyle's answer –  Thomas Levesque Sep 20 '10 at 19:25

Something to this effect?

string Repeat(string, count)
{
    string out="";
    for(int i=0;i<count;i++)
        out = out+string;
    return out;
}

called:

Console.WriteLine(Repeat("asfasf",4));
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8  
Never use string concatenation in a loop, unless you know for sure there will be a small number of iterations. It can put a lot of pressure on the GC by creating a lot of temporary string instances. Use a StringBuilder instead –  Thomas Levesque Sep 20 '10 at 19:23
1  
Awesome, good to know! –  Kyle Sep 20 '10 at 19:47

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