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I have a simple recursive algorithm, which returns Fibonacci numbers:

private static double fib_recursive(int n){
    if(n <= 2) return 1;
    else return fib_recursive(n-1) + fib_recursive(n-2);
}

Now my task is to return the time, which this method would take to calculate the 400-th fibonacci number on a given computer e.g. fib_recursive(400). "Would" is in bold, because I can't run the function, as it would take to long for this method to give an answer.

How can it be best achieved?

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1  
"Task" sounds an awful lot like "homework". I suggest retagging. –  Jason R. Mick Sep 20 '10 at 19:20
2  
Don't do fibonacci with recursion if you don't save the calculated values. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 20 '10 at 19:53
    
Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen, i also have an iterative method for this , but the task is to count the time, spent by recursive one. –  Jevgeni Bogatyrjov Sep 20 '10 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Calculate how much time to do each recursive call, figure out how many recursive calls, and you have an answer.

There are faster ways to do this, using a smarter recursion algorithm, but for your algorithm just put in some timing information.

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Thanks, I'll try to figure out how to count the number of calls.. –  Jevgeni Bogatyrjov Sep 20 '10 at 20:26

Timing is done by taking differences of System.currenTimeMillis() or System.nanoTime() before and after what you want to meausre.

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But, if you know you can't call a function that number of times, then how do you figure out the theoretical time it will take? Even if the time changes based on how many was processed ahead of it, you can come up with some reasonable guess. –  James Black Sep 20 '10 at 20:11
    
Do measurements for f(1), f(2), f(3), f(4) etc until it takes too long, and then extrapolate. The steps needed for the naive recursive Fibonacci-function for x is proportional with f(x). –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 20 '10 at 20:46

I ended up with probably not a best solution, but here is what i've got(may be it will help someone in future):

1) I measured the time, which the recursive method needs to calculate the 42-nd(for example) Fibonacci number.

2) Using the iterative method, I counted how many program rows are executed while calculating the 42-nd Fibonacci number with the recursive method. (Rows = 3*fib_iterative(42)-2)

3) Deviding 2. by 1. I got the average number of rows executed in 1 millisecond.

4) Using the iterative method, I counted how many program rows are executed while calculating the 400-th Fibonacci number with the recursive method. (Rows = 3*fib_iterative(400)-2)

5) Deviding 4. by 3. I got the estimated time spent by fib_recursive(400).

// Recursive algorithm, calculates Fibonacci number (slow)
private static double fib_recursive(int n){
    if( n <= 2) return 1;
    else return fib_recursive(n-1) + fib_recursive(n-2);
}

// Iterative algorithm, calculates Fibonacci number (fast)
private static double fib_iterative(int n){
    double a = 1, b = 1;
    for (int i = 2; i <= n; i++){
        b = a + b;
        a = b - a;
    }
    return a;
}

// Get time, which fib_recursive(int) needs to calculate the 400th Fibonacci number
private static long testRecursiveFor400(){
    int elapsedTime = 0;
    int start = (int) System.currentTimeMillis();
    fib_recursive(42);
    elapsedTime = (int) (System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
    return (3 * (long) fib_iterative(400) - 2) / ((3 * (int) fib_iterative(42) - 2) / elapsedTime);
}
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It would have been more effective to just sit down with pencil and paper, write an equation, or find a pattern, on how many calls you need to make, recursively, then, just do 1000 recursive calls, get the average time for one call and multiply by what you had calculated. It may be as simple as n * (n + 1) / 2 is the number of calls, but that is just a guess. :) –  James Black Sep 29 '10 at 11:27

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