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I am tring to compile and my C++ program on Linux using gcc command.

I used gcc -lm MyOwn.c Main.c -o Out

Myown.c is another file I should link to the main.

The Out file is successfully created.

The problem is Out does not run.

When I tried to use gcc or cc to create exe file it gives me a lot of errors

Can someone help me?

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7  
What "does not run"? What output do you get when you run your gcc command? –  Joe Sep 20 '10 at 20:27
1  
What's the output put of: file Out –  karlphillip Sep 20 '10 at 20:29
8  
By the way, if it really is C++ code, you should use g++ instead of gcc. –  schnaader Sep 20 '10 at 20:33
3  
This is not a good question, since you provide no clue as to what the errors are. –  David Thornley Sep 20 '10 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

Try

chmod +x Out
./Out
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By the way, Out should be already chmodded correctly. –  Matteo Italia Sep 20 '10 at 21:25
    
Correct, but sometimes things happen when one fiddles with files :) –  jlafay Sep 20 '10 at 21:33

The question is tagged C++. You say you're new c++. But the example you gave involve c code only.

gcc is used to compile c programs.
Use g++ instead.

C++ code files should have the suffix .cpp or .c++, but never .c.

Fix those, try again, and edit the question to add the command line error if it still doesn't work.

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Sometimes, also .C (uppercase C) is used (which is recognized by g++), although it's not recommended, since it's not portable on case-insensitive systems (and it's also more difficult to catch at glance). –  Matteo Italia Sep 20 '10 at 21:57
    
I purposely omitted .C. It's about as useful as a trigraph. Though .cc is common enough. –  deft_code Sep 21 '10 at 14:21

Your problem may be that you're compiling as C code. Your files end with a ".c", and you are invoking gcc. You should end the file name with ".cpp" or ".cc" or ".c++" or something else the compiler will recognize as C++.

You can also compile as C++ explicitly by typing g++ instead of gcc.

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