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So that means "$1$" will pass as well as "$50000000000000$" or "$12345678$" length of number doesn't matter but it must be only digits and must start and end with a '$'.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

\$\d+\$

And if you don’t want to allow leading zeros:

\$[1-9]\d*\$
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thanks, I hate asking questions like this I should be able to do this myself but the learning curve seems steep –  ioSamurai Sep 20 '10 at 21:21
    
I suggest reading oreilly.com/catalog/9780596528126 ... utterly, utterly boring, but after plowing through it no regex should be a problem for you. –  Sorcy Sep 20 '10 at 21:29
    
gskinner.com/RegExr –  amra Sep 20 '10 at 21:39
    
favorite learn source is regular-expressions.info And for writing regular expression try gskinner.com/RegExr –  amra Sep 20 '10 at 21:39

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