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I'm wondering why it seems that adding a method to the prototype of a string literal seems to work, but adding a property does not? I was playing with ideas in relation to this question, and have the following code:

String.prototype._str_index1 = 0;
String.prototype._str_reset = function() {
    this._str_index1 = 0;
};
String.prototype._str_substr = function(len) {
  var ret = this.substr(this._str_index1, len);
  this._str_index1 = this._str_index1 + len;
  return ret;
};

var testString = new String('Loremipsumdolorsitamet,consectetur');
log(testString._str_substr(5));
log(testString._str_substr(4));
​

This works fine. If however I change the third-last line to:

var testString = 'Loremipsumdolorsitamet,consectetur';

...it seems that although the method _str_substr exists and is callable on the string literal, the value of the property _str_index1 is always 0.

What's up?

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Most of the things you call ‘string literal’, are actually called ‘string primitive’: literals are a syntax to describe a string, e.g., to assign a string (or number, boolean, object, etc.) to a variable; primitive values are non-composite values that variables and objects can contain (apart from (other) objects). –  Marcel Korpel Sep 21 '10 at 1:23
    
Except when it's not....'indexOf' is not a function when called against a string.... –  Cris Stringfellow Nov 3 '12 at 7:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The string primitive is converted to a transient String object every time you try to invoke a method of the String object (the JavaScript engine internally converts a string primitive to a String object when necessary). After this function returns, the String object is (unobtrusively) converted back to a string primitive (under the hood) and this new primitive is returned (and most of the time assigned to a variable); every time a method of the String object is invoked.

So, after each invocation of testString._str_substr, _str_index1 is thrown away with the object and a new object (with a reset _str_index1) is created when _str_substr is called again.

See also MDC:

Because JavaScript automatically converts between string primitives and String objects, you can call any of the methods of the String object on a string primitive. JavaScript automatically converts the string primitive to a temporary String object, calls the method, then discards the temporary String object.

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Yeah, that's pretty much what I was trying to say :) –  Dagg Nabbit Sep 21 '10 at 1:03

This happens because the object is created and immediately thrown away when the assignment is made, because it's a string literal.

So with the first version, an object is created and kept, so testString is an object, not a string literal. In the second case, an object is created and thrown away, so all properties get lost...

Now try replacing that line with this:

var testString = 'Loremipsumdolorsitamet,consectetur'._str_substr();

Interesting, right? It still returns a string primitive, but that could be fixed...

String.prototype._str_substr = function(len) {
  var ret = this.substr(this._str_index1, len);
  this._str_index1 = this._str_index1 + len;
  return new String(ret);
};

Of course these are just suggestions designed to help explain why literals act differently than objects, not real-world recommendations...

share|improve this answer
    
I don't get it. –  spender Sep 21 '10 at 0:48
    
No me neither. @no, I have no idea what you mean. –  sje397 Sep 21 '10 at 0:49
    
“the object is created and immediately thrown away when the assignment is made” sounds like an object is created and thrown away on the initial assignment (var testString = …), not when invoking _str_substr. –  Marcel Korpel Sep 21 '10 at 1:09
    
Marcel - it is. –  Dagg Nabbit Sep 21 '10 at 1:20
    
Hmm, I'm looking for it in the ECMAScript specification, but can't find it (at least not at this hour). But if that would be the case, the method of the String object can't be called after the string assignment is made. The string primitive has to be converted every time a method of the String object is invoked. –  Marcel Korpel Sep 21 '10 at 1:41

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