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How to convert byte size into human-readable format in Java? Like 1024 should become "1 Kb" and 1024*1024 should become "1 Mb".

I am kind of sick of writing this utility method for each project. Are there any static methods in Apache Commons for this?

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13  
If you use the standardized units, 1024 should become "1KiB" and 1024*1024 should become "1MiB". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix –  Pascal Cuoq Sep 21 '10 at 8:48
    
@Pascal: There should be several functions or an option to specify the base and the unit. –  Aaron Digulla Sep 21 '10 at 8:49
    
Until such a library exists it sounds like a code golf challenge. –  DerMike Sep 21 '10 at 9:44
    
possible duplicate of Format file size as MB, GB etc –  Aaron Digulla Sep 21 '10 at 9:52
    
@Pascal Cuoq: Thanks for the reference. I didn't realise until I read it that here in the EU we are required to use the correct prefixes by law. –  JeremyP Sep 21 '10 at 10:48
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6 Answers

up vote 417 down vote accepted

Here is my go at it (no loops and handles both SI units and binary units):

public static String humanReadableByteCount(long bytes, boolean si) {
    int unit = si ? 1000 : 1024;
    if (bytes < unit) return bytes + " B";
    int exp = (int) (Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(unit));
    String pre = (si ? "kMGTPE" : "KMGTPE").charAt(exp-1) + (si ? "" : "i");
    return String.format("%.1f %sB", bytes / Math.pow(unit, exp), pre);
}

Example output:

                              SI     BINARY

                   0:        0 B        0 B
                  27:       27 B       27 B
                 999:      999 B      999 B
                1000:     1.0 kB     1000 B
                1023:     1.0 kB     1023 B
                1024:     1.0 kB    1.0 KiB
                1728:     1.7 kB    1.7 KiB
              110592:   110.6 kB  108.0 KiB
             7077888:     7.1 MB    6.8 MiB
           452984832:   453.0 MB  432.0 MiB
         28991029248:    29.0 GB   27.0 GiB
       1855425871872:     1.9 TB    1.7 TiB
 9223372036854775807:     9.2 EB    8.0 EiB   (Long.MAX_VALUE)
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27  
That's pretty cool (+1) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 21 '10 at 9:48
3  
Don't you have the suffixes reversed? Binary units uses "iB". And minor nitpick, SI kilo uses a lowercase k. –  Jeff Mercado Sep 21 '10 at 10:33
4  
+1. You rock, aioobe. –  Adeel Ansari Sep 21 '10 at 10:54
5  
I prefer 1.0 KB. Then it's clear how many significant figures the output entails. (This also seems to be the behavior of for instance the du command in Linux.) –  aioobe Sep 21 '10 at 14:48
5  
I think every one should note that in your project customer want see values in base 2 (devided by 1024) but with common prefix. Not KiB, MiB, GiB etc. Use KB, MB, GB, TB for it. –  Borys May 23 '13 at 13:33
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FileUtils.byteCountToDisplaySize(long size) would work if your project can depend on org.apache.commons.io.

JavaDoc for this method

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2  
I already have commons-io on my project, but ended up using aioobe's code, because of the rounding behavior (see the link for JavaDoc) –  Iravanchi Jul 9 '12 at 12:31
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I asked the same Question recently:

Format file size as MB, GB etc

While there is no out-of-the-box answer, I can live with the solution:

private static final long K = 1024;
private static final long M = K * K;
private static final long G = M * K;
private static final long T = G * K;

public static String convertToStringRepresentation(final long value){
    final long[] dividers = new long[] { T, G, M, K, 1 };
    final String[] units = new String[] { "TB", "GB", "MB", "KB", "B" };
    if(value < 1)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid file size: " + value);
    String result = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < dividers.length; i++){
        final long divider = dividers[i];
        if(value >= divider){
            result = format(value, divider, units[i]);
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

private static String format(final long value,
    final long divider,
    final String unit){
    final double result =
        divider > 1 ? (double) value / (double) divider : (double) value;
    return new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(result) + " " + unit;
}

Test code:

public static void main(final String[] args){
    final long[] l = new long[] { 1l, 4343l, 43434334l, 3563543743l };
    for(final long ll : l){
        System.out.println(convertToStringRepresentation(ll));
    }
}

Output (on my German Locale):

1 B
4,2 KB
41,4 MB
3,3 GB

Edit: I have opened an Issue requesting this functionality for Google Guava. Perhaps someone would care to support it.

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Why is 0 an invalid file-size? –  aioobe Sep 21 '10 at 9:29
    
@aioobe it was in my use case (displaying the size of an uploaded file), but arguably that's not universal –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 21 '10 at 9:38
    
If you change the last line to return NumberFormat.getFormat("#,##0.#").format(result) + " " + unit; it works in GWT too! Thanks for this, it's still not in Guava. –  tom Oct 24 '13 at 12:30
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private static final String[] Q = new String[]{"", "K", "M", "G", "T", "P", "E"};

public String getAsString(long bytes)
{
    for (int i = 6; i > 0; i--)
    {
        double step = Math.pow(1024, i);
        if (bytes > step) return String.format("%3.1f %s", bytes / step, Q[i]);
    }
    return Long.toString(bytes);
}
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filename=filedilg.getSelectedFile().getAbsolutePath();
File file=new File(filename);

String disp=FileUtils.byteCountToDisplaySize(file.length());
System.out.println("THE FILE PATH IS "+file+"THIS File SIZE IS IN MB "+disp);
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    public static String floatForm (double d)
    {
       return new DecimalFormat("#.##").format(d);
    }


    public static String bytesToHuman (long size)
    {
        long Kb = 1  * 1024;
        long Mb = Kb * 1024;
        long Gb = Mb * 1024;
        long Tb = Gb * 1024;
        long Pb = Tb * 1024;
        long Eb = Pb * 1024;

        if (size <  Kb)                 return floatForm(        size     ) + " byte";
        if (size >= Kb && size < Mb)    return floatForm((double)size / Kb) + " Kb";
        if (size >= Mb && size < Gb)    return floatForm((double)size / Mb) + " Mb";
        if (size >= Gb && size < Tb)    return floatForm((double)size / Gb) + " Gb";
        if (size >= Tb && size < Pb)    return floatForm((double)size / Tb) + " Tb";
        if (size >= Pb && size < Eb)    return floatForm((double)size / Pb) + " Pb";
        if (size >= Eb)                 return floatForm((double)size / Eb) + " Eb";

        return "???";
    }
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