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I was asked this question in the MS written walkin-interview:

Find errors in the program below which is supposed to return a new string with \n appended to it.

char* AddnewlinetoString(char *s)
{
  char buffer[1024];
  strcpy(buffer,s);
  buffer[strlen(s)-1] = '\n';
  return buffer;
}

I'd tried to code on myself and was able to get it working by making buffer variable global and having buffer[strlen(s)] = '\n'. But did not know there were many other bugs in it.

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11  
So which ones did you see? –  duffymo Sep 21 '10 at 9:11
41  
Is that code from windows 95 ? –  Alexandre C. Sep 21 '10 at 9:14
13  
Let's see people from Java schools answer this one :) –  Lucas Sep 21 '10 at 14:41
5  
why this question has been closed? Its very much related to programming. –  giri Sep 21 '10 at 17:01
13  
There are two kinds of programmers - the ones that will think through a problem to see all of the relevant details, and the ones who will just keep trying stuff until it seems to work. Guess which group you fall into? Guess which kind Microsoft is looking for? –  Mark Ransom Sep 21 '10 at 17:49

12 Answers 12

I can see a few:

Length of input string not checked.

What if the strlen(s) > 1023? You can fit a string of length at most 1023 in buffer.

Overwriting the last char with \n

You are overwriting last char with newline. Your \n should go where \0 used to be and you need to add a new \0 after \n

Variable buffer is local to function and you are returning its address.

Memory for buffer is allocated on stack and once the function returns, that memory is freed.

I would do:

char* AddnewlinetoString(char *s) {

  size_t buffLen = strlen(s) + 2; // +1 for '\n' +1 for '\0'
  char *buffer = malloc(buffLen); 
  if(!buffer) {
   fprintf(stderr,"Error allocting\n");
   exit(1);
  }
  strcpy(buffer,s);
  buffer[buffLen-2] = '\n';
  buffer[buffLen-1] = 0;
  return buffer;
}
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4  
Funnily enough, the \0 is probably still there (if the first error doesn't trip it). Look again, is the \0 overwritten? –  Muhammad Alkarouri Sep 21 '10 at 9:17
3  
2. strlen doesn't include the terminator in the length. So at most, the code just replaces the last char of the string with a newline, but the nul will remain if it already was there. –  cHao Sep 21 '10 at 9:18
3  
@TygerKrash: The stack holds values local to the current function. Once the function returns, your pointer is pointing to garbage, i.e. you don't know what's there (e.g. the next function's local variables can overwrite the region your pointer points to). –  3lectrologos Sep 21 '10 at 11:32
6  
This will leak memory if used like: str = AddNewlineToString(str); –  sje397 Sep 21 '10 at 14:08
4  
@sje397: That's not a problem with the function, provided it is properly documented that the caller owns the returned buffer, and is responsible for freeing it appropriately. The only alternative is to work with a global buffer, which has much more severe issues. *edit: Given that you're stuck with a C-like interface, of course. –  Dennis Zickefoose Sep 21 '10 at 16:54
  1. there's no limit in strcpy, better use strncpy.
  2. you are copying to static buffer and returning pointer.
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3  
Surely that's not a static buffer? –  unwind Sep 21 '10 at 9:12
3  
3. Buffer overflow –  Filip Ekberg Sep 21 '10 at 9:13
3  
Instead of strncpy one should make sure the buffer is of suitable size. Exactly what good is it doing if you get the input truncated, rather than having newline appended? This should take care of both issues. –  visitor Sep 21 '10 at 9:16
    
If available, strlcpy would be better. –  Matteo Italia Sep 21 '10 at 9:22

Here is a C++ version without errors:

std::string AddnewlinetoString(std::string const& s)
{
    return s + "\n";
}

And here is how I would probably write that in C++0x:

std::string AddnewlinetoString(std::string s)
{
    return std::move(s += "\n");
}
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4  
Doesn't answer the question though :) –  Filip Ekberg Sep 21 '10 at 9:23
4  
True, but... I don't think the point of these exercises is to come up with a better version per se, but to understand the intricacies of the errors. Consider it a test of debugging your mediocre colleagues' work, rather than a test of writing new code yourself. –  Andrzej Doyle Sep 21 '10 at 9:25
    
The question is tagged C++, that would imply this is a potential correct answer! –  AshleysBrain Sep 21 '10 at 12:18
1  
@Steve: I added your suggested reference to const version, but I still like the pass by value version better, especially with the std::move edited in :) –  FredOverflow Sep 21 '10 at 14:14
1  
So in conclusion, I think the best way would be, for both C++03 and C++0x, std::string AddnewlinetoString(std::string s){ s += '\n'; return s; } Considering the parameter: in C++03, when working with an lvalue you'd make a copy anyway, so nothing is lost. And a compiler will elision the copy of an rvalue. In C++0x, you again make the needed copy, but are guaranteed to move-construct the parameter when it's given an rvalue. So nothing lost there. And then you do your manipulation, then return the copy. In C++03, you get NRVO and in C++0x, you get an implicit move return. (Again, I think.) –  GManNickG Sep 22 '10 at 18:11

I would also add that the name of the method should stick to pattern and each word should start with capital letter:

char* AddNewlineToString(char *s)
{
}

ps. Thanks Konrad, I have changed the method name as you have suggested

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4  
But “newline” (as in “newline character”, not “new line of text”) is one word. The name should be AddNewlineToString. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 21 '10 at 9:51

3 things

   int len = strlen(s);
   char* buffer = (char*) malloc (len + 2);   // 1
   strcpy(buffer,s);
   buffer[len] = '\n';           // 2 
   buffer[len+1] = '\0';         // 3
   return buffer;

Edit: Based on comments

share|improve this answer
    
Calling strlen() three times instead of using a temporary might lead to disappointing results. –  sharptooth Sep 21 '10 at 9:23
    
@sharptooth: Have updated!! –  aeh Sep 21 '10 at 9:29
    
@aeh: strlen doesn't count the terminating '\0', so actually it replaces the last char before the '\0' and fails for empty strings that contain only the termination. –  Secure Sep 21 '10 at 10:31
    
@aeh: your answer contains a bug. You simply return a new string with the last character of s replaced by \n. len is one character too small. –  JeremyP Sep 21 '10 at 10:39
    
You don't check for s being NULL and for malloc() to fail. –  Georg Fritzsche Sep 23 '10 at 23:28

Here is a corrected version (community wiki incase I missed anything)

// caller must free() returned buffer string!
char* AddnewlinetoString(char *s)
{
  size_t len;
  char * buffer;

  if (s == NULL)
    s = "";

  len = strlen(s);
  buffer = malloc(len+2);
  if (buffer == NULL)
    abort();
  strcpy(buffer,s);
  buffer[len] = '\n';
  buffer[len+1] = 0;
  return buffer;
}

As tony mentions, s may be a valid address but still be a malformed c-string, with no null bytes. The function could end up reading until it causes a segfault, or some other horrible thing. While this is still idiomatic C, most folks prefer counted strings (rather than null terminated ones.)

// caller must free() returned buffer string!
char* AddnewlinetoStringN(char *s, size_t len)
{
  char * buffer;

  if (s == NULL)
    s = "";

  buffer = malloc(len+1); // only add 1 byte, since there's no need for the nul
  if (buffer == NULL)
    abort();
  strncpy(buffer,s,len);
  buffer[len] = '\n';
  return buffer;
}
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You're one character short on your malloc I think - you need space for the \n and the terminating NULL, so len+2. –  JosephH Sep 21 '10 at 9:26
    
I think you're right too, fixed now... (my C is a bit rusty) –  IfLoop Sep 21 '10 at 9:32
1  
i'd personally check for s being null as the first thing I did. This is a common problem with string args and if you dont check for it, it will assert. –  AnthonyLambert Sep 21 '10 at 13:03
1  
@Tony: Not a bad call, how do you like this version? –  IfLoop Sep 21 '10 at 21:55
    
there is just one more little hole.... if you pass in a string without a terminating zero, but to nail that down you would need to assume maximum lengths for strings. –  AnthonyLambert Sep 22 '10 at 10:18

The main problem with this code is that it's vulnerable to a stack buffer overflow exploit. It's a classic example.

Basically, the input char* can be made longer than 1024 bytes; these extra bytes will then overwrite the stack, allowing an attacker to modify the function return pointer to point to their malicious code. Your program will then unwittingly execute the malicious code.

Microsoft might be expected to care a good deal about these kinds of exploits, since the Code Red Worm famously used a stack buffer overflow to attack hundreds of thousands of computers running IIS web server software in 2001.

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No need for return pointer. Change the incoming pointer.

int len = strlen(s); s[len] = '\n'; s[len + 1] = '\0';

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It will not work, first assignment replaces terminating zero, and second strlen will return invalid result. You should swap them. –  Abyx Sep 23 '10 at 11:50
    
Nice. Edited now. –  Manoj R Sep 23 '10 at 12:45
    
That need not work always. What if the input is a string literal or a char array which has len-1 char already stuffed in so that when you access index len+1 you are stepping past the allocated memory. –  codaddict Sep 23 '10 at 12:52
    
@codaddict: if it was a string literal, someone is ignoring the signature - it isn't a const parameter. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 12 '10 at 4:20

In C++ it should be

std::string AddNewlineToString(const std::string& s) // pass by const reference
{
    return s + '\n'; // and let optimizer optimize memory allocations
}
share|improve this answer

Can be made very simple using strdup:

char* AddnewlinetoString(char *s) {
char *buffer = strdup(s);
buffer[strlen(s)-1] = '\n';
return buffer;
}

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For C-style strings it may be

char* // we want return a mutable string? OK
AddNewlineToString(
  const char* s // We don't need to change the original string, so it's const.
)
{
     const size_t MAX_SIZE = 1024; // if it's a mutable string,
                                   // it should have a known capacity.

     size_t len = strlen(s);
     if(len + sizeof("\n") // To avoid the magic number "2".
         > MAX_SIZE)
         return NULL; // We don't know what to do with this situation,
                      // the user will check the result and make a decision -
                      // to log, raise exception, exit(), etc.

     // static                    // We want a thread-safe result
     char* buf = new char[1024];  // so we allocate memory in the heap
                                  // and it's C-language-string but not C language :)

     memcpy(buf, s, len); // Copy terminating zero, and rewrite it later? NO.
     memcpy(buf + len, "\n", sizeof("\n")); // The compiler will do it in one action like
        // *(int16_t*)(buf + len) = *(int16_t*)"\n";
        // rather than two assignments.

     return buf;
}
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Your use of sizeof("\n") was initially unclear; I'm not sure avoiding a "magic number" is worth it in this case. –  Dennis Zickefoose Sep 21 '10 at 16:43
    
What's the point of using new but not std::string? –  GManNickG Sep 22 '10 at 18:16
    
@Gman: for example if we want provide a C-compatible interface. With heap allocated memory, we should provide only one function to delete any heap-allocated memory, but for allocated-by-string memory we can't easily do it. –  Abyx Sep 22 '10 at 18:50
    
@Abyx: Pretty strange to justify something with "It might be used in C." I wouldn't assume that in any of my code, and such an assumption is certainly outside the scope of the question. –  GManNickG Sep 22 '10 at 19:08
    
@GMan: not "in C" but "C-compatible". It means "in C#, F#, Python (ctypes), Haskell and lots of other languages". You can't export function with std::string result from DLL, and use this function in module written in another language (or module compiled by another C++ compiler too). It's Microsoft's question, it's about Windows, not cross-platform programming with gcc only. –  Abyx Sep 22 '10 at 19:38

Here goes a simpler way:

char* AddnewlinetoString(char *s)
{
  char buffer[strlen(s)+1];
  snprintf(buffer,strlen(s),"%s\n",s);
  return buffer;
}
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