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I have an H3 heading that I'd like to style as having a particular background color, but without having the element's background take up the full width of the parent element. Seeing as H3 is by default a block element, my style would need to change the element to an inline-block element, or just an inline inline element like so:

h3 {
    background-color: #333;
    color: white;
    display: inline-block;
}

This will work fine, but only if it is immediately followed by a block element. I do not want to change the markup just to cater for this style, so I was wondering if there is a way to cause any adjacent element, irrespective of how it displays, to start on the next line?

Assume I can use CSS3.

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1  
Anyway, why 'what is a better way ... than making it a block element'? What is not good about making it a block element? – Stephan Muller Sep 21 '10 at 10:08
1  
@Litso - I explained this in my question. A block element takes up the full width of the parent element, which would mess up the styling that I am going for. – Nathan Ridley Sep 21 '10 at 10:19
    
try padding-bottom: 15px; display: table; – KingRider Aug 11 '15 at 14:39
up vote 9 down vote accepted

try this:

h3:after {
  content: ".";
  display: block;
  height: 0;
  clear: both;
  visibility: hidden;
}
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+1 for inventiveness, but doesn't work for me in Chrome – Stephan Muller Sep 21 '10 at 10:03
    
:after has very patchy support – Tom Medley Sep 21 '10 at 10:05
    
Actually I think this sort of thing is quite common, particularly with float clearing. It works for me in Chrome. @Litso - you sure you did it right? – Nathan Ridley Sep 21 '10 at 10:36
display:block;
width:auto;

This will make the width as small as possible (not filling the whole parent element) and make other elements appear below.

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1  
*Other than making it a block element. At least read the title. – AlexanderMP Sep 21 '10 at 9:59
    
Sorry, I read 'without' as 'with', my bad. I've updated answer, still think block is the correct way to do this. – Tom Medley Sep 21 '10 at 10:00
2  
Actually, this is what was asked for. The OP wanted something that works in the layout as a block element (it lives by itself vertically) but restricts the background area to the width of the content. The question asked for a "no block" solution because the OP didn't know that a block element could act that way. – Stan Rogers Sep 21 '10 at 10:10
2  
@Stan - that is very true. @fredley - Good suggestion, however setting an auto width on a block element simply tells it that it is ok to obey its default behaviour, which is to fill the width of the parent element. I tested it in Chrome anyway, which confirmed this. – Nathan Ridley Sep 21 '10 at 10:27
1  
tested in firefox, element still get full width of its parent – slier Mar 8 '11 at 18:34

How often does it happen that the element after the <h3> is an inline element? (Usually after a header there should be like a <p>, <ul> or other block elements, although this totally depends on your html. Is it predictable? Is it an option to just turn every element that directly follows a <h3> into a block element?

h3 ~ * { display: block }

The only other way I know to have a block-element not take up all the space is floating it, but this leaves another problem.

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The element after the H3 could easily be an inline-block element, or it could be floated left, which would sit it on the same line as the H3. Also, by forcing the adjacent element to be a block element, you are overriding how it interacts with its own following siblings, which may have unintended consequences. – Nathan Ridley Sep 21 '10 at 10:21

I've had to do something similar with inline nav items that need breaking at certain points. Does this work?

h3:after {
  content: "\A ";
  line-height: 0;
  white-space: pre;
  display:inline-block;
}

I seem to remember IE7 having an issue with it.

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\A is exist bug other browser, try \00000a ;-) ... no need inline-block and line-height, just block – KingRider Aug 11 '15 at 14:21

If you don't need to center h3, this may help:

h3 {
  background-color: #333;
  color: white;
  display: inline-block;
  float: left;
  clear: left;
}
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I come across this all the time in my code, usually for div's that are inline-block'ed. The best way I've seen is to force a new line is to wrap your code in an additional div. Your original html gets the formatting you expected and the div wrapper forces a new line.

Assuming this is your h3 styling,

h3 {
  display: inline-block;
}

Then just wrap it in a div.

<div>
   <h3>My heading</h3>
</div>
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