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I have a system where I salt and hash passwords before saving them to the database, using FormsAuthentication in asp.net

What I want to do is, rather than ask the customer for their password each time, I just want 3 random letters from their password. How can I compare this to the hash in the database? Will hashing still work in this case? From what I gather hashing is only designed to be a one way process and shouldn't be decrypted, so is checking 3 random letters for a hash even possible?

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You're correct. Hashing is one way. By the way, why would you want to do such an operation? Could you explain more? – Sagar V Sep 21 '10 at 10:41
    
So that it adds an extra level of security, for example on Bank websites, they ask for a password, but only 3 random letters, that way incase anyone sees the user type in the password, or attempts to key log the password, they will never obtain the password, but only 3 random characters from it. Is there any possible way to make this work with hashing? – Andy Sep 21 '10 at 10:45
    
To achieve that, you'd need to know what the clear password is when you compare the letters, because you can't generate an identical hash with only 3 letters. – svanryckeghem Sep 21 '10 at 10:52
    
Thanks svanryckeghem , I think I might need to use a custom encrypt/decryption solution to work with 3 letter selection. If you put that down as an answer on this page, I will mark it as the solution :) Thanks. – Andy Sep 21 '10 at 10:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To achieve that, you'd need to know what the clear password is when you compare the letters, because you can't generate an identical hash with only 3 letters.

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