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public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<String, Map<Long, List<String>>> map = getHashMap();
}

static <K,V> Map<K,V> getHashMap()
{
    return new HashMap<K, V>();
}

I saw a similar code in google guava (as factory methods) for making instances of Hashmap without mentioning the generic types.I don't understand how the generic is getting inferred by the above program.I mean how can the function getHashMap understand the type of map since i'm not passing any type information to the function.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The getHashMap function does not have to infer the types. It's at the call site that javac is required by the Java Language Spec to infer that the types agree (15.12.2.7 Inferring Type Arguments Based on Actual Arguments).

I believe the current plan is (still) for JDK7 to support the diamond operator, so this sort of thing will work with new too, although with a bit of apparently pointless syntax.

Map<String, Map<Long, List<String>>> map = new HashMap<>();
                                                      ^^diamond
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1  
Can you explain a little bit. –  Emil Sep 21 '10 at 12:55
1  
@Emil About what? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 21 '10 at 12:56
1  
@Tom:What do you mean that javac will infer the type.Can you explain how this thing works in steps. –  Emil Sep 21 '10 at 12:59
    
@Emil The actual specification is complicated. See the link. Generally, it does what you want most of the time. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 21 '10 at 13:13
    
Small question: Since in runtime there is no difference between HashMap<K,V> and a plain old HashMap because type erasure makes all HashMaps the same, do we really have type inference or it is more like "type indifference"? I mean, the object it's just a hashmap. The variable has the<K, V> information, but only in compilation time –  Pablo Grisafi Sep 21 '10 at 13:21

At the bytecode level the method will have a descriptor that just says, there's a method with the name getHashMap, that takes no arguments and returns a Map (no generics).

Then when the compiler is analyzing the line Map<String, Map<Long, List<String>>> map = getHashMap();, and it will say, ok, I need to have a variable with a declared type of Map<String, Map<Long, List<String>>>, but to actually get the instance I need to call a method. At this point it's the compiler's job to check if the return type of the method matches the declared type of the variable your assigning that result to. So it checks if String matches K, and if Map<Long, List<String>> matches V, which they do, so it considers that the assignment is type safe, and generates the bytecode which basically uses a Map (no generics) variable.

If you would have declared your method as:

static <K extends Number,V> Map<K,V> getHashMap()
{
    return new HashMap<K, V>();
}

when analyzing the assignment, the compiler would see that String doesn't match K extends Number, would throw a compilation error, and won't create bytecode for that assignment.

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class XX
  static <T> T foo(){ return null; }

String  s = XX.foo();
Integer i = XX.foo();

Java infers that T is String in the 1st case, Integer in the 2nd case.

What does "infer" mean? It means that Java guesses that in the two statements, the programmer most like wants T==String in the 1st case, T==Integer for the 2nd case, being a nice guy, Java takes these guesses as fact, and programmers do not have to manually specify the Ts

    String  s = XX.<String> foo();
    Integer i = XX.<Integer>foo();

But really, Java dictates that the return type T must be determined like that.

I find this thing very fishy, not sure what's the reason behind the design. Probably, when (if) Java adds reifiable types(i.e. the real class of T is available at runtime), the design makes more sense:

class XX
  static <T> T foo(){ return new T(); }

String  s = XX.foo();
Integer i = XX.foo();

I still don't like the fact that the type of a method is context dependent.

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