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I have been trying to follow some WCF Data Services examples and have the following code:

private void OnSaveCompleted(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
        {
            context.EndSaveChanges(result);
        });
    }

Which is called by the following:

this.context.BeginSaveChanges(SaveChangesOptions.Batch, this.OnSaveCompleted, null);

Now I am getting a little confused here. Firstly, the first bit of code is showing a syntax error of "Argument type lambda expression is not assignable to parameter type System.Delegate". So instead of blindly trying to follow the example code I tried to understand what was going on here. Unfortunately I am struggling to understand the error plus what is actually happening.

I feel a bit stupid as I am sure this is easy.

Thanks in advance for any enlightenment!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 31 down vote accepted

The problem is that the compiler doesn't know what kind of delegate you're trying to convert the lambda expression to. You can fix that either with a cast, or a separate variable:

private void OnSaveCompleted(IAsyncResult result)
{        
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke((Action) (() =>
    {
        context.EndSaveChanges(result);
    }));
}

or

private void OnSaveCompleted(IAsyncResult result)
{
    Action action = () =>
    {
        context.EndSaveChanges(result);
    };
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action);
}
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Thanks, but now I am getting "Cannot access non-static method 'BeginInvoke' in static context. I am more confused now, as this isn't a static method? –  Jon Archway Sep 21 '10 at 13:51
1  
@Jon: It thinks you're trying to use BeginInvoke as a static method on the Dispatcher class - whereas you want to use the Dispatcher property and then call BeginInvoke on the relevant instance. My guess is that this isn't in an appropriate class with a Dispatcher property. Having just seen that this is WCF, I'm not sure sure where you'd get a Dispatcher from. I'm more used to using it from WPF and Silverlight. –  Jon Skeet Sep 21 '10 at 14:05
1  
This is actually on a ViewModel class in a WPF application –  Jon Archway Sep 21 '10 at 14:16
    
The ViewModel typically has no knowledge of the view, much less an associated dispatcher. You could go about using Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher, but I strongly advise against it (you could easily end up in the wrong thread and the delegate will never be invoked); the best way I think would be to use something like MVVMLight's Messenger and send a message to the view - the message could contain the Action and the View could invoke it using its dispatcher. –  Alex Paven Sep 21 '10 at 14:45
1  
@KalaJ: Well I would try to do some research first, then ask a question which gives some code and describes what you think is happening, possibly explaining that I've disputed your terminology. –  Jon Skeet Aug 1 at 16:17

Answer by Jon Skeet is very good but there are other possibilities. I prefer "begin invoke new action" which is easy to read and to remember for me.

private void OnSaveCompleted(IAsyncResult result)
{       
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() =>
    {
        context.EndSaveChanges(result);
    }));
}

or

private void OnSaveCompleted(IAsyncResult result)
{       
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(delegate
    {
        context.EndSaveChanges(result);
    }));
}

or

private void OnSaveCompleted(IAsyncResult result)
{       
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => context.EndSaveChanges(result)));
}
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