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$string = "
put returns between paragraphs

for linebreak add 2 spaces at end

";

Want to remove all new lines from string.

I've this regex, it can catch all of them, the problem is I don't know with which function should I use it.

/\r\n|\r|\n/

$string should become:

$string = "put returns between paragraphs for linebreak add 2 spaces at end ";
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If you're doing thousands of replacements, avoid using preg_replace. It is almost twice as slow as str_replace. –  Alex W Jun 20 at 13:23

8 Answers 8

up vote 134 down vote accepted

You have to be cautious of double line breaks, which would cause double spaces. Use this really efficient regular expression:

$string = trim(preg_replace('/\s\s+/', ' ', $string));

Multiple spaces and newlines are replaced with a single space.

Edit: As others have pointed out, this solution has issues matching single newlines in between words. This is not present in the example, but one can easily see how that situation could occur. An alternative is to do the following:

$string = trim(preg_replace('/\s+/', ' ', $string));
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6  
+1 for the regex –  Daniel Vandersluis Sep 21 '10 at 14:05
4  
Before you use this solution, see my answer below and the comments to my answer. This solution may not work as you expect. –  matsolof Sep 23 '10 at 8:30
    
in regular expression "\s Match a whitespace character", why would it match a newline? –  Michael Z Jun 11 at 0:00

A few comments on the accepted answer:

The + means "1 or more". I don't think you need to repeat \s. I think you can simply write '/\s+/'.

Also, if you want to remove whitespace first and last in the string, add trim.

With these modifications, the code would be:

$string = preg_replace('/\s+/', ' ', trim($string));
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You're right; /\s\s+/ would fail to match the linefeed in foo\nbar. –  Alan Moore Sep 22 '10 at 23:18
1  
Good to get a cofirmation that I'm right. What do "foo" and "bar" mean, by the way? I know they're placeholders, but what do the words actually mean? And wouldn't it be better to use more familiar words, that would be less confusing to beginners, as placeholders? When I first saw "foo" and "bar" in a tutorial or another, I thought the words were code, and it took me a while to figure out they aren't. –  matsolof Sep 23 '10 at 8:50
    
4  
+1 This solution worked in my situation, the accepted solution for this question didn't work. –  BruceHill Dec 17 '12 at 15:19

Just use preg_replace()

$string = preg_replace('~[\r\n]+~', '', $string);

You could get away with str_replace() on this one, although the code doesn't look as clean:

$string = str_replace(array("\n", "\r"), '', $string);

See it live on ideone

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1  
OP wants a space between "paragraphs" and "for". If you just remove the newline characters, there won't be one. –  Daniel Vandersluis Sep 21 '10 at 13:39
1  
first one doesn't work –  James Sep 21 '10 at 13:41
    
please correct that to $string = preg_replace("~[\r\n]~", "",$string); –  erikb85 Sep 21 '10 at 13:42
3  
@erik Then I would be "incorrecting" it. It works fine as it is. –  NullUserException Sep 21 '10 at 13:44
1  
@Vineet It's just a delimiter denoting start and end of the regex –  NullUserException Apr 19 at 14:59
$string = str_replace(array("\n", "\r"), ' ', $string);
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1  
Escape sequences in PHP need to be double quoted. –  Daniel Vandersluis Sep 21 '10 at 13:37
    
This doesn't do exactly what the OP wants though, since this is the same as elusive's answer and it's not removing the \r characters –  NullUserException Sep 21 '10 at 13:40
    
@NullUser: Why don't you update your own post instead of commenting on this? –  fabrik Sep 21 '10 at 13:43
    
Because my answer is already correct (AFAIK) –  NullUserException Sep 21 '10 at 13:54
    
@NullUser: Except the fact it's replaces everything with '' instead of ' '. –  fabrik Sep 21 '10 at 14:02

PCRE regex replacements can be done using preg_replace: http://php.net/manual/en/function.preg-replace.php

$new_string = preg_replace("/\r\n|\r|\n/", ' ', $old_string);

Would replace new line or return characters with a space. If you don't want anything to replace them, change the 2nd argument to ''.

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1  
The preg functions use PCRE, not POSIX, regular expressions. There are ereg functions that use POSIX, but they are now deprecated. –  Daniel Vandersluis Sep 21 '10 at 13:46
    
Oops, good point, sorry! Correcting now. –  n00dle Sep 21 '10 at 13:52

Use this:

replace series of newlines with an empty string:

$string = preg_replace("/[\\n\\r]+/", "", $string);

or you probably want to replace newlines with a single space:

$string = preg_replace("/[\\n\\r]+/", " ", $string);
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Please format your code properly. This is done by indenting the relevant line by four spaces. –  elusive Sep 21 '10 at 13:38
2  
That's why I use single quotes so I don't need to escape those characters. \\n looks terrible. \\\\ to match a single backslash is just awful. –  NullUserException Sep 21 '10 at 13:42

You should use str_replace for its speed and using double quotes with an array

str_replace(array("\r\n","\r"),"",$string);
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this is the pattern I would use

$string = preg_replace('@[\s]{2,}@',' ',$string);
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