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i want to to get the height/width of an image inside a hidden div-containter, but .height() and .width() both returns 0 (like expected).


$('body').append('<div id="init"><img id="myimg" src="someimage.png" /></div>');
$('#init').hide();
$('#myimg').height(); // == 0
$('#myimg').width(); // == 0

How can i get the correct height/width of the image? I need it to make some decisions :-)

Best regards, Biggie

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2  
If you read the comments you'll see that @Yi Jiang says his own answer is erroneous. –  egrunin Sep 21 '10 at 14:32
    
Would you be so kind as to change your accepted answer (yes, you can do that) to Robert's, since he is correct and I'm not. Thank you. –  Yi Jiang Sep 21 '10 at 14:40
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9 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Its because the image has not loaded yet.....

$('body').append('<div id="init"><img id="myimg" src="something.png" /></div>');
$('#init').hide();

$('#myimg').bind("load",function(){
    alert(this.height) //works
})​

heres a test: http://jsfiddle.net/WMpSy/

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I just ran across the solution for this, what you do is instead of rely on jQuery to do this for you. Instead, get the javascript element and get the height off of the element itself, as follows:

var img = hiddenDiv.children('img');

var imgHeight = img.get(0).height;
var imgWidth = img.get(0).width;

The jQuery method get(0) allows us to get at the underlying DOM element and interestingly enough, the DOM element dimensions don't change.

One note though, for performance reasons, you will want to cache the img.get(0) if you plan on using it more.

jQuery get method documentation

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2  
Thank you. This is the only answer that worked for me because the images I was trying to get at were in a hidden div after load completes. –  Jarek Apr 26 '12 at 22:41
1  
"Interestingly enough" is correct! Assume 'img' represents a single targeted element... not sure why img.height and img.get(0).height return different results, but I am glad that the .get() version exists! Thanks Samuel –  Robert Waddell Jul 2 '13 at 21:58
2  
This should be the accepted answer. Appending the image and then hiding it might work, but it's not nearly as clean as this method. –  squarecandy Feb 25 at 22:12
    
I wish I could upvote more than once. This is the best solution I have come across after hours of NaN. Works perfectly. Thank you, Samuel. –  Just Plain High Apr 25 at 3:00
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You can't hide it if you want the correct height and width, but you can move it such that it will be out of the screen, and thus effectively hidden. Try this:

var hiddenDiv = $('<div id="init"><img id="myimg" src="someimage.png" /></div>').appendTo('body').css({
    'position': 'absolute',
    'top': -9999
});

var img = hiddenDiv.children('img');
img.height();
img.width();
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As you pointed out on my post, This is loading a cached image, The OP should review both answers. –  RobertPitt Sep 21 '10 at 14:30
    
@Robert I've done the testing - display: none elements do have height - typing in $('#answer-3761104').hide().height() gives the correct height - so this answer is entirely wrong. –  Yi Jiang Sep 21 '10 at 14:35
    
I thought it would of been down to the image load event. –  RobertPitt Sep 21 '10 at 14:37
    
@Yi Jiang, RobertPitt: I had no problems with this solution, because i used a bind to 'load' by intuition wherein i call height() and width() :-) So this works as good as the solution of RobertPitt. –  Biggie Sep 26 '10 at 20:59
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Make the div temporarily visible in order to compute the height or hide the div off screen instead of using display: None. I have used the first approach, and found it to be fast enough that you will never see the element.

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1  
Yeah, and even if it's slow enough to show it something like an absolute position plus a -1000 margin should hide it during the period that it's visible. –  Stephan Muller Sep 21 '10 at 14:07
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you have to use find()

$('body').find('#myimg').width();

or

$('body').find('#myimg').attr("width");

becouse you have appended it after the DOM was loaded

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5  
Wrong, why would we need to find when we have an ID ? –  RobertPitt Sep 21 '10 at 14:17
    
i had the same problem, and i have fixed it, by using find(). –  Fincha Sep 21 '10 at 14:30
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I'm not sure you can do it with jQuery (or javascript at all). I had a similar problem with misreported heights and widths on loading/hidden img's. You can, however, wait till the image loads, get it's correct height and width and then hide the parent... like so:

var height, width;

$('#myimg').load(function() {
    height = $(this).height();
    width = $(this).width();
    $('#init').hide();
}
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I had a similar problem. The thing is that if an image or div containing an image has style="display:none" then its css height=0. I found that the height() and width() functions gave the wrong values, eg 0! The solution for me was to ensure that the images have their attributes set so even if they are hidden the values are still accessible. So use:

$('#testImg').attr('height') and $('#testImg').attr('width') to get the height and width of the image.

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Yes its because the image is not loaded yet and this is my solution:

$('<img src="My Image URL" />').appendTo('body').css({
                'position': 'absolute',
                'top': -1
            }).load(function() {
                console.log('Image width: ' + $(this).width());
                console.log('Image height: ' + $(this).height());
                $(this).remove();
            });
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it looks like you need to compute the height & width of an image. if so, you're thinking of it too hard.

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1  
-1 Unless you explain why, or what his alternatives might be, this is not useful. –  egrunin Sep 21 '10 at 14:10
4  
You're thinking of it too hard. –  Stephen Sep 21 '10 at 14:50
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