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I have primarily a C# background (and am very much a newbie) so forgive me if my assumptions based on this are the problem.

Simply put, one of the features in a piece of software I'm working on (in Java) has the user input a file name. What I intend to do is have the program loop and append a string to the end of the file name from an array of possible append strings, to see if a file exists, and if it does, open it. I am guaranteed to have only ONE file of a given name, so breaking out of the loop on the first success isn't a bug (if the file name the user specifies is "foo" and the appendStrings array has "bar" and "baz" inside of it, I am guaranteed there will never be both a "foobar" and "foobaz" in the directory). What I eventually came up with was similar to this:

public FileReader LocateFile(String fileName)
{
    FileReader toReturn = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < appendStrings.length; i++)
    {
        File locatedFile = new File(fileName + appendStrings[i]);
        try
        {
            toReturn = new FileReader(locatedFile);
        }
        catch(FileNotFoundException ex)
        {
            continue;
        }
    }
    //...handling in case I didn't find a file.
}

Great, it works just fine. Except for two problems:

  1. The compiler is upset with me that I'm declaring a variable (ex) that I'm not using. I suppose I could log the exception or something, but that seems ridiculous because this will happen often and I'd rather not fill my log file with excessive noise just to make the compiler happy.
  2. I've read from countless sources that you don't use exceptions to control the flow of the program; you use them for exceptional circumstances.

My question is: is there a way to please the compiler in this situation? I have to catch that FileNotFoundException, so using File.exists() won't really solve my problem. Am I doing things backwards, or is this just how Java rolls?

share|improve this question
    
You should also consider that File#exists() returning false and new FileReader(File) throwing a FileNotFoundException do not have the same semantic meaning. File#exists() will return true for directories and may return true for plain files, for which you don't have read privileges, while the FileReader will throw a FileNotFoundException in these cases. –  jarnbjo Sep 21 '10 at 16:23

3 Answers 3

You are right, you shouldn't use exceptions to control your program flow.

You have already written the algo in plane strings just convert it into java code.

public FileReader LocateFile(String fileName)
{
    FileReader toReturn = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < appendStrings.length; i++)
    {
        File locatedFile = new File(fileName + appendStrings[i]);
         if(locatedFile.exists()) {
             toReturn = new FileReader(locatedFile);
             break;
        }
    }
    //...handling in case I didn't find a file.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes! If the API provides a call to do the job for you, you should use the call! +1 –  Sagar V Sep 21 '10 at 16:16
2  
Except...it doesn't work that way. You get an unreported FileNotFoundException compile error. Secondly, what happens if the OS deletes the file (or someone opens it or otherwise locks it) after locatedFile.exists() returns true and before the "new FileReader()" line executes? –  Sepulchritude Sep 21 '10 at 16:49
    
You still need to catch the FileNotFoundException that can be thrown when creating a FileReader. –  Grodriguez Sep 21 '10 at 16:52

I've read from countless sources that you don't use exceptions to control the flow of the program; you use them for exceptional circumstances.

You should be testing whether the file exists with File.exists() instead of using the exception for this purpose. You are right in that you still need to catch the exception when creating the FileReader object, however as pointed out by other people, a file may exist and you still may not be able to read it with a FileReader. These two situations must be accounted for separately.

The compiler is upset with me that I'm declaring a variable (ex) that I'm not using. I suppose I could log the exception or something, but that seems ridiculous because this will happen often and I'd rather not fill my log file with excessive noise just to make the compiler happy.

Indeed. However as said above, you should test with File.exists() first, if the file seems to exist yet you cannot create the FileReader, then that is a problem you should handle.

By the way, neither my compiler nor my IDE are warning about this unused variable. Maybe a setting in your IDE?

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So the "kosher" way to handle this type of situation is to go ahead and check File.exists (and maybe also File.IsADirectory and File.CanRead) first and use the exception if those two are good but creating the FileReader still fails. I was mostly tripped up on the semantics of "FileNotFoundException" because I thought it being thrown meant the file was...well, not found. –  Sepulchritude Sep 21 '10 at 17:15
    
That's the way I would handle it, yes. And you are right about the somewhat misleading name of FileNotFoundException; this exception is actually used to signal several different error conditions, some of which involve existing files that cannot be opened for various reasons. –  Grodriguez Sep 21 '10 at 17:31
    
You might want to accept the answer (green tick mark) if it was useful for you :-) –  Grodriguez Sep 22 '10 at 12:38

First thing you're right about exceptions, they should be only used on exceptional circumstances.

A second point, with your code the continue; isn't necessary. If an exception is thrown, then you continue looping, but what happen if no exceptions are thrown ?
Well, you continue looping.

And a third point, the compiler isn't upset because of the ex variable, it's only your IDE which tells you that the variable isn't used, no worries it happens a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
@SuppressWarning may help –  Jaydeep Patel Sep 21 '10 at 16:16
    
You're absolutely right; it's the IDE, and not the compiler, that's generating the warning. I can live with the IDE being unhappy. –  Sepulchritude Sep 21 '10 at 16:52
    
In IntelliJ you can call the exception 'ignore' or 'ignored' or place a comment in the catch block to say why the exception was ignored. This might work for your IDE as well. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 21 '10 at 18:12

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