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Is there a way to get a background in CSS to stretch or scale to fill its container?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 375 down vote accepted

Use the CSS 3 property background-size:

#my_container {
    background-size: 100% auto; /* width and height, can be %, px or whatever. */
}

This is available for modern browsers, since 2012.

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65  
To preserve the aspect ratio of the image you should use "background-size: cover;" or "background-size: contain;". I've built a polyfill that implements those values in IE8: github.com/louisremi/background-size-polyfill –  Louis-Rémi Dec 5 '12 at 9:53
3  
I know this is a year old but I have to (laugh and) agree with the 'decent browsers' part. Check all of your browsers but I've had more issues with IE than any of them. –  ErocM Jan 11 '13 at 20:36
12  
I had to set background-size: 100% 100%; to get the desired effect I was going for, if that helps anyone else. –  guanome Jan 28 '13 at 22:18
2  
+1 just for "decent browsers" (but also for the answer) –  jacob Feb 20 '13 at 19:54
1  
comment should be /* comment */ instead of # not a comment –  0xc0de Sep 6 '13 at 14:54

Scaling an image with CSS is not quite possible, but a similar effect can be achieved in the following manner, though.

Use this markup:

<div id="background">
    <img src="img.jpg" class="stretch" alt="" />
</div>

with the following CSS:

#background {
    width: 100%; 
    height: 100%; 
    position: absolute; 
    left: 0px; 
    top: 0px; 
    z-index: 0;
}

.stretch {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}

and you should be done!

In order to scale the image to be "full bleed" and maintain the aspect ratio, you can do this instead:

.stretch { min-width:100%; min-height:100%; width:auto; height:auto; }

It works out quite nicely! If one dimension is cropped, however, it will be cropped on only one side of the image, rather than being evenly cropped on both sides (and centered). I've tested it in Firefox, Webkit, and Internet Explorer 8.

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Very well Solid. It works very well. Thanks. –  Fábio Antunes Jul 19 '09 at 15:15
1  
This works well...but was looking for something a little more robust (probably with javascript) that also centered it and adjusted based on if the picture was landscape or portrait. If anyone has a solution in that vein would love a link...thanks! –  Brian Armstrong Mar 2 '10 at 19:03
4  
In case anyone else is interested, this seemed to work well: buildinternet.com/project/supersized –  Brian Armstrong Mar 2 '10 at 19:20
1  
Horizontal centering can be done with margin: 0 auto on .stretch. By only setting the width or height, the aspect ratio stays the same. Try using max-width and max-height to limit the zoom-factor... –  Ronald Mar 21 '10 at 16:21
1  
This doesn't work for me in ie8/ie9, but works in ie6/ie7 (and of course all other browsers). In ie8/ie9, the image only shows up for about 3/4 of the div. Anybody have the same issue? –  Frank LoVecchio Sep 16 '11 at 2:14

Use the background-size attribute in CSS3:

.class {
     background-image: url(bg.gif);
     background-size: 100%;
}

EDIT: Modernizr supports detection of background-size support. You can use a JavaScript workaround written to work however you need it and load it dynamically when there is no support. This will keep the code maintainable without resorting to intrusive CSS hacks for certain browsers.

Personally I use a script to deal with it using jQuery, its an adaption of imgsizer. As most designs I do now use width %'s for fluid layouts across devices there is a slight adaptation to one of the loops (accounting for sizes that aren't always 100%):

for (var i = 0; i < images.length; i++) {
    var image = images[i],
        width = String(image.currentStyle.width);

    if (width.indexOf('%') == -1) {
        continue;
    }

    image.origWidth = image.offsetWidth;
    image.origHeight = image.offsetHeight;

    imgCache.push(image);
    c.ieAlpha(image);
    image.style.width = width;
}

EDIT: You may also be interested in jQuery CSS3 Finaliz[s]e.

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1  
Nice - thanks . –  Lawrence Dol Jul 30 '10 at 3:47
3  
Just to emphasize, Modernizr does NOT enable support for background-size in browsers that don't natively support it. It just has a convenient cross-browser test for it. It's up to you to fake it when the test returns false. –  Chris Moschini Jun 26 '12 at 19:18

For modern browsers, you can accomplish this by using:

body {
    background-image: url(bg.jpg);
    -webkit-background-size: cover;
    -moz-background-size: cover;
    -o-background-size: cover;
    background-size: cover;
}

cover means stretching the image either vertically or horizontally so it never tiles/repeats.

That would work for Safari 3 (or later), Chrome, Opera 10+, Firefox 3.6+, and Internet Explorer 9 (or later).

For it to work with lower verions of Internet Explorer, try these CSS:

filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='.myBackground.jpg', sizingMethod='scale');
-ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='myBackground.jpg', sizingMethod='scale')";
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2  
To Clement: What you suggest for filters for previous IE:s work only partly. It scales the picture width ok but the height scaling goes wrong by not restricting it to anything. The higher the page so is the background picture.. =( I tried this on IE8. And also, could it be in anyway possible use these 'cover' commands and somehow make this compatible with mobiles like iphone? I know there is the viewport problem but could it be possibke to scale the viewport to whole screen in a way that background is scaled here?? Thanks for responses! –  user611392 Feb 10 '11 at 18:55
3  
The IE-specific filters are not ideal solutions so feel free to condition for IE with CSS alternatives. I personally use the CSS3 "cover" on my own site and it works fine on iOS devices, just be sure to define the device-width. –  Clement Apr 19 '11 at 22:38
    
Cover doesn`t stretch the bg. 100% 100% yes. –  neoswf Dec 20 '12 at 15:01

Try the article background-size. If you use all of the following, it will work in most browsers except Internet Explorer.

.foo {
    background-image: url(bg-image.png);
    -moz-background-size: 100% 100%;
    -o-background-size: 100% 100%;
    -webkit-background-size: 100% 100%; 
    background-size: 100% 100%;
} 
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1  
Thank you! This differs from "background-size: cover" –  Pavel Vlasov Jul 28 '11 at 9:52
1  
this one actually works –  Bozho Sep 4 '11 at 20:27
1  
this stretched for me on the ipad, but didn't scale. thx for posting. –  Don Cote Nov 28 '11 at 23:44
1  
This is great for making it the background shrink too. Thanks! –  beingalex May 15 '12 at 14:50

Not currently. It will be available in CSS 3, but it will take some time until it's implemented in most browsers.

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2  
Great article available at A List Apart: Supersize that Background, Please! –  jensgram Nov 2 '10 at 11:29
1  
-1 I don't think this answer is very relevant... and it doesn't offer a solution of any kind. –  Potherca Jun 15 '11 at 14:32
    
@Potherca this answer was correct at the time (almost 3 years ago). –  Eran Galperin Jun 16 '11 at 9:51
3  
There is a reason the date is shown. It should be kept for historical references. Are you going over all the old answers on the site and downvoting them? the answer is still correct even if more information has been added since then. Also note that other answers here basically state the same (and some are indeed incorrect - they state it's impossible). I get the feeling you picked on this one since it has some votes. –  Eran Galperin Jun 17 '11 at 14:42
1  
No, I picked on this one since all it does is say "Computer say no" even though there are several solutions to this problem even back in 2008 ;-) –  Potherca Oct 13 '11 at 19:47

Define "stretch and scale"...

If you've got a bitmap format, it's generally not great (graphically speaking) to stretch it and pull it about. You can use repeatable patterns to give the illusion of the same effect. For instance if you have a gradient that gets lighter towards the bottom of the page, then you would use a graphic that's a single pixel wide and the same height as your container (or preferably larger to account for scaling) and then tile it across the page. Likewise, if the gradient ran across the page, it would be one pixel high and wider than your container and repeated down the page.

Normally to give the illusion of it stretching to fill the container when the container grows or shrinks, you make the image larger than the container. Any overlap would not be displayed outside the bounds of the container.

If you want an effect that relies on something like a box with curved edges, then you would stick the left side of your box to the left side of your container with enough overlap that (within reason) no matter how large the container, it never runs out of background and then you layer an image of the right side of the box with curved edges and position it on the right of the container. Thus as the container shrinks or grows, the curved box effect appears to shrink or grow with it - it doesn't in fact, but it gives the illusion that is what's happening.

As for really making the image shrink and grow with the container, you would need to use some layering tricks to make the image appear to function as a background and some javascript to resize it with the container. There's no current way of doing this with CSS...

If you're using vector graphics, you're way outside my realm of expertise I'm afraid.

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Stretch=Change x and y dimensions independently changing the aspect ration of the image, Scale=change x and y dimensions proportionately maintaining the aspect ratio of the image. –  Lawrence Dol Dec 17 '08 at 23:12
    
@SoftwareMonkey: As a background then no, you can't change the stretch and scale in the true sense of the terms in straight CSS. You have to use various CSS tricks to give the illusion that this is what's happening as I've described. –  BenAlabaster Dec 18 '08 at 0:45

In one word: no. The only way to stretch an image is with the <img> tag. You'll have to be creative.

This used to be true in 2008, when the answer was written. Today modern browsers support background-size which solves this problem. Beware that IE8 doesn't support it.

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4  
@Blowsie - Cute. Check the answer date. The browser landscape has changed a bit in the last 5 years. –  Vilx- Aug 13 '13 at 13:00
.style1 {
        background: url(images/bg.jpg) no-repeat center center fixed;
        -webkit-background-size: cover;
        -moz-background-size: cover;
        -o-background-size: cover;
        background-size: cover;
}

Works in:

  • Safari 3+
  • Chrome Whatever+
  • IE 9+
  • Opera 10+ (Opera 9.5 supported background-size but not the keywords)
  • Firefox 3.6+ (Firefox 4 supports non-vendor prefixed version)

In addition you can try this for an ie solution

    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='.myBackground.jpg', sizingMethod='scale');
    -ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='myBackground.jpg', sizingMethod='scale')";
    zoom:1;

Credit to this article by Chris Coyier http://css-tricks.com/perfect-full-page-background-image/

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This is what I've made of it. In the stretch class, I simply changed the height to auto. This way your background picture has always got the same size as the width of the screen and the height will allways have the right size.

#background {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    margin-left: 0px;
    margin-top: 0px;
    z-index: 0;
}

.stretch {
    width:100%;
    height:auto;
}
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I would like to point out that this is equivalent to doing:

html { width: 100%; height: 100%; }
body { width: 100%; height: 100%; /* Add background image or gradient to stretch here. */}
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Another great solution for this is Srobbin's Backstretch which can be applied to the body or any element on the page - http://srobbin.com/jquery-plugins/backstretch/

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Nick, we generally ask that you provide the salient parts in your answer, and supply an external link only for further detail - this helps answers remain useful in the event of link-rot. –  Lawrence Dol Nov 2 '12 at 8:23
1  
My Bad. Generally speaking, you add backstretch to the <head> of your document then initialize like so: $(".your-element").backstretch("path/to/image.jpg"); –  nickff Nov 2 '12 at 14:00

Try this

http://jsfiddle.net/5LZ55/4/

body
{ 
    background: url(http://p1.pichost.me/i/40/1639647.jpg) no-repeat fixed; 
    background-size: cover;
    -webkit-background-size: cover;
    -moz-background-size: cover;
    -o-background-size: cover;
}
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An additional tip for SolidSmile's cheat is to scale (the proportionate re-sizing) by setting a width and using auto for height.

Ex:

#background {
    width: 500px;
    height: auto;
    position: absolute; 
    left: 0px; 
    top: 0px; 
    z-index: 0;
}
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Add a background-attachment line:

#background {
    background-attachment:fixed;
    width: 100%; 
    height: 100%; 
    position: absolute; 
    margin-left: 0px; 
    margin-top: 0px; 
    z-index: 0;
}

.stretch {
    width:100%;
    height:auto;
}
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protected by Community Jan 24 '12 at 17:04

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