Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like a command that emits the name of the tracked branch for the branch I'm on. Something like:

$ git checkout --track -b topic origin/master
Branch topic set up to track remote branch master from origin.
Switched to a new branch 'topic'
$ git unknown-command
origin/master

Is there such a command?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Will emit the remote being tracked:

git config branch.<branchname>.remote

Will emit the ref being tracked on that remote:

git config branch.<branchname>.merge

I don't believe that there is a combined command that will emit both together (at least within normal Git; you could always make your own).


For example, for a local master branch:

$ git config branch.master.remote
origin
$ git config branch.master.merge
refs/heads/master
share|improve this answer
9  
With recent versions of git, you can emit the name of the remote-tracking branch for your current branch with git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name @{u}. It emits something like refs/remotes/origin/master. If you ignore the "refs/remotes" bit, this is exactly what was asked for. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 22 '10 at 3:19
    
Nice tip Kevin. :) –  Amber Sep 22 '10 at 5:41
    
@Kevin Ballard: could you post that suggestion as a new answer? It's very useful, and not prominent enough at the moment, I think... –  Mark Longair Apr 22 '11 at 12:05
    
@Mark Longair: Will do –  Kevin Ballard Apr 22 '11 at 20:55

As per Mark Longair's request, my previous comment is now reproduced as an answer.

With recent versions of git, you can emit the name of the remote-tracking branch for your current branch with git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name @{u}. It emits something like refs/remotes/origin/master.

If you go one step further and use the --abbrev-ref flag, as in git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name --abbrev-ref @{u}, it will strip off the refs/remotes/ bit and leave you with just the short branch name, such as origin/master.

share|improve this answer
    
Another way is % git for-each-ref --format='%(upstream:short)' $(git symbolic-ref -q HEAD), but I like yours better. –  cdunn2001 Mar 17 '12 at 19:44
    
found a scenario where this trick does not work: i rename the local branch with git branch -m and then push it in order to create a new remote branch ; now after that the value returned by your command ( git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name @{u} ) is the old branch name (the remote branch that was before renaming of the local branch) - i would have expected the name of the new remote branch. –  MichaelMoser May 29 at 8:22
1  
@MichaelMoser: You renamed the local branch and pushed it, but you didn't update the upstream tracking information. You can use the -u flag to git push to change the upstream tracking information. –  Kevin Ballard May 30 at 16:58
    
Thanks. that explains it. –  MichaelMoser Jun 1 at 7:02
git config --global alias.show-upstream '!sh -c '\''

    test -n "$1" || set -- HEAD
    set -- "$(git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name "$1")"
    git for-each-ref --format="%(upstream:short)" "$1"


'\'' -'

git show-upstream
git show-upstream HEAD
git show-upstream some/local/branch
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.