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I have a string that represents a non indented XML that I would like to pretty-print. For example:

<root><node/></root>

should become:

<root>
  <node/>
</root>

Syntax highlighting is not a requirement. To tackle the problem I first transform the XML to add carriage returns and white spaces and then use a pre tag to output the XML. To add new lines and white spaces I wrote the following function:

function formatXml(xml) {
    var formatted = '';
    var reg = /(>)(<)(\/*)/g;
    xml = xml.replace(reg, '$1\r\n$2$3');
    var pad = 0;
    jQuery.each(xml.split('\r\n'), function(index, node) {
        var indent = 0;
        if (node.match( /.+<\/\w[^>]*>$/ )) {
            indent = 0;
        } else if (node.match( /^<\/\w/ )) {
            if (pad != 0) {
                pad -= 1;
            }
        } else if (node.match( /^<\w[^>]*[^\/]>.*$/ )) {
            indent = 1;
        } else {
            indent = 0;
        }

        var padding = '';
        for (var i = 0; i < pad; i++) {
            padding += '  ';
        }

        formatted += padding + node + '\r\n';
        pad += indent;
    });

    return formatted;
}

I then call the function like this:

jQuery('pre.formatted-xml').text(formatXml('<root><node1/></root>'));

This works perfectly fine for me but while I was writing the previous function I thought that there must be a better way. So my question is do you know of any better way given an XML string to pretty-print it in an html page? Any javascript frameworks and/or plugins that could do the job are welcome. My only requirement is this to be done on the client side.

share|improve this question
2  
For a fancy HTML output (ala IE XML display), see the XSLT transformation used in the XPath Visualizer. You can download the XPath Visualizer at: huttar.net/dimitre/XPV/TopXML-XPV.html –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 25 '10 at 16:04

13 Answers 13

up vote 36 down vote accepted

From the text of the question I get the impression that a string result is expected, as opposed to an HTML-formatted result.

If this is so, the simplest way to achieve this is to process the XML document with the identity transformation and with an <xsl:output indent="yes"/> instruction:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
      <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
      </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applying this transformation on the provided XML document:

<root><node/></root>

most XSLT processors (.NET XslCompiledTransform, Saxon 6.5.4 and Saxon 9.0.0.2, AltovaXML) produce the wanted result:

<root>
  <node />
</root>
share|improve this answer
2  
It looks like a great solution. Is there any cross browser way to apply this transformation in javascript? I don't have a server side script to rely on. –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 18 '08 at 8:06
2  
Yes. Look at Sarissa: dev.abiss.gr/sarissa and here: xml.com/pub/a/2005/02/23/sarissa.html –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 18 '08 at 14:58
1  
This doesn't work on chrome. I should have checked if Sarissa works on chrome first. Wasted almost an hour on this. –  ablmf Jan 25 '11 at 4:18
    
@ablmf: What "doesn't work"? What is "Chrome"? I never heard of such XSLT processor. Also, if you have a look at the date of the answer, the Chrome browser was non-existent at that time. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 25 '11 at 4:38
3  
@ablmf: Also note that this question (and my answer to it) is to get the prettyfied XML as a string (text) and not HTML. No wonder such a string doesn't display in a browser. For a fancy HTML output (ala IE XML display), see the XSLT transformation used in the XPath Visualizer. You can download the XPath Visualizer at: huttar.net/dimitre/XPV/TopXML-XPV.html . You may need to adjust the code a little bit (such as to remove the javascript extension functions for collapsing/expanding a node), but otherwise the resulting HTML should display fine. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 25 '11 at 4:47

consider to use vkBeautify plugin

http://www.eslinstructor.net/vkbeautify/

it's written in plain javascript, very small: less then 1.5K if minified, very fast: less then 5 msec. to process 50K XML text.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks vkBeautify is pretty simple to use for pretty XML printing. –  anubhava Aug 28 '12 at 17:05

Personnaly, I use google-code-prettify with this function :

prettyPrintOne('<root><node1><root>', 'xml')
share|improve this answer
2  
Oups, you need to indent XML and google-code-prettify only colorized the code. sorry. –  Touv Jul 29 '09 at 15:07
1  
combine prettify with smth like stackoverflow.com/questions/139076/… –  Chris Jan 29 '10 at 13:03
2  
That combined with code.google.com/p/vkbeautify for indentation made for a good combo. –  Vdex Jun 6 '12 at 9:57

Slight modification of efnx clckclcks's javascript function. I changed the formatting from spaces to tab, but most importantly I allowed text to remain on one line:

var formatXml = this.formatXml = function (xml) {
        var reg = /(>)(<)(\/*)/g;
        var wsexp = / *(.*) +\n/g;
        var contexp = /(<.+>)(.+\n)/g;
        xml = xml.replace(reg, '$1\n$2$3').replace(wsexp, '$1\n').replace(contexp, '$1\n$2');
        var pad = 0;
        var formatted = '';
        var lines = xml.split('\n');
        var indent = 0;
        var lastType = 'other';
        // 4 types of tags - single, closing, opening, other (text, doctype, comment) - 4*4 = 16 transitions 
        var transitions = {
            'single->single': 0,
            'single->closing': -1,
            'single->opening': 0,
            'single->other': 0,
            'closing->single': 0,
            'closing->closing': -1,
            'closing->opening': 0,
            'closing->other': 0,
            'opening->single': 1,
            'opening->closing': 0,
            'opening->opening': 1,
            'opening->other': 1,
            'other->single': 0,
            'other->closing': -1,
            'other->opening': 0,
            'other->other': 0
        };

        for (var i = 0; i < lines.length; i++) {
            var ln = lines[i];
            var single = Boolean(ln.match(/<.+\/>/)); // is this line a single tag? ex. <br />
            var closing = Boolean(ln.match(/<\/.+>/)); // is this a closing tag? ex. </a>
            var opening = Boolean(ln.match(/<[^!].*>/)); // is this even a tag (that's not <!something>)
            var type = single ? 'single' : closing ? 'closing' : opening ? 'opening' : 'other';
            var fromTo = lastType + '->' + type;
            lastType = type;
            var padding = '';

            indent += transitions[fromTo];
            for (var j = 0; j < indent; j++) {
                padding += '\t';
            }
            if (fromTo == 'opening->closing')
                formatted = formatted.substr(0, formatted.length - 1) + ln + '\n'; // substr removes line break (\n) from prev loop
            else
                formatted += padding + ln + '\n';
        }

        return formatted;
    };
share|improve this answer

Or if you'd just like another js function to do it, I've modified Darin's (a lot):

var formatXml = this.formatXml = function (xml) {
    var reg = /(>)(<)(\/*)/g;
    var wsexp = / *(.*) +\n/g;
    var contexp = /(<.+>)(.+\n)/g;
    xml = xml.replace(reg, '$1\n$2$3').replace(wsexp, '$1\n').replace(contexp, '$1\n$2');
    var pad = 0;
    var formatted = '';
    var lines = xml.split('\n');
    var indent = 0;
    var lastType = 'other';
    // 4 types of tags - single, closing, opening, other (text, doctype, comment) - 4*4 = 16 transitions 
    var transitions = {
        'single->single'    : 0,
        'single->closing'   : -1,
        'single->opening'   : 0,
        'single->other'     : 0,
        'closing->single'   : 0,
        'closing->closing'  : -1,
        'closing->opening'  : 0,
        'closing->other'    : 0,
        'opening->single'   : 1,
        'opening->closing'  : 0, 
        'opening->opening'  : 1,
        'opening->other'    : 1,
        'other->single'     : 0,
        'other->closing'    : -1,
        'other->opening'    : 0,
        'other->other'      : 0
    };

    for (var i=0; i < lines.length; i++) {
        var ln = lines[i];
        var single = Boolean(ln.match(/<.+\/>/)); // is this line a single tag? ex. <br />
        var closing = Boolean(ln.match(/<\/.+>/)); // is this a closing tag? ex. </a>
        var opening = Boolean(ln.match(/<[^!].*>/)); // is this even a tag (that's not <!something>)
        var type = single ? 'single' : closing ? 'closing' : opening ? 'opening' : 'other';
        var fromTo = lastType + '->' + type;
        lastType = type;
        var padding = '';

        indent += transitions[fromTo];
        for (var j = 0; j < indent; j++) {
            padding += '    ';
        }

        formatted += padding + ln + '\n';
    }

    return formatted;
};
share|improve this answer

All of the javascript functions given here won't work for an xml document having unspecified white spaces between the end tag '>' and the start tag '<'. To fix them, you just need to replace the first line in the functions

var reg = /(>)(<)(\/*)/g;

by

var reg = /(>)\s*(<)(\/*)/g;
share|improve this answer

what about creating a stub node (document.createElement('div') - or using your library equivalent), filling it with the xml string (via innerHTML) and calling simple recursive function for the root element/or the stub element in case you don't have a root. The function would call itself for all the child nodes.

You could then syntax-highlight along the way, be certain the markup is well-formed (done automatically by browser when appending via innerHTML) etc. It wouldn't be that much code and probably fast enough.

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If you are looking for a JavaScript solution just take the code from the Pretty Diff tool at http://prettydiff.com/?m=beautify

You can also send files to the tool using the s parameter, such as: http://prettydiff.com/?m=beautify&s=http://stackoverflow.com/

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var formatXml = this.formatXml = function (xml) {
        var reg = /(>)(<)(\/*)/g;
        var wsexp = / *(.*) +\n/g;
        var contexp = /(<.+>)(.+\n)/g;
        xml = xml.replace(reg, '$1\n$2$3').replace(wsexp, '$1\n').replace(contexp, '$1\n$2');
        var pad = 0;
        var formatted = '';
        var lines = xml.split('\n');
        var indent = 0;
        var lastType = 'other';
share|improve this answer
Or just print out the special HTML characters?

Ex: <xmlstuff>&#10; &#09;<node />&#10;</xmlstuff>   


&#09;   Horizontal tab  
&#10;   Line feed
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Use above method for pretty print and then add this in any div by using jquery text() method. for example id of div is xmldiv then use :

$("xmldiv").text(formatXml(youXmlString));

share|improve this answer
    
What "above method for pretty print"? –  JW Lim Jul 3 at 6:19

XMLSpectrum formats XML, supports attribute indentation and also does syntax-highlighting for XML and any embedded XPath expressions:

XMLSpectrum formatted XML

XMLSpectrum is an open source project, coded in XSLT 2.0 - so you can run this server-side with a processor such as Saxon-HE (recommended) or client-side using Saxon-CE.

XMLSpectrum is not yet optimised to run in the browser - hence the recommendation to run this server-side.

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var reg = /(>)\s*(<)(\/*)/g;
xml = xml.replace(/\r|\n/g, ''); //deleting already existing whitespaces
xml = xml.replace(reg, '$1\r\n$2$3');
share|improve this answer

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