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I'm using the following Javascript to restrict a text field on my website to only accept numerical input, and no other letters or characters. The problem is, it REALLY rejects all other key inputs, like ctrl-A to select the text, or even any other browser functions like ctrl-T or ctrl-W while the text box is selected. Does anyone know of a better script to only allow numerical input, but not block normal commands (that aren't being directly input into the field)? Thanks Here is the code I'm using now:

function numbersonly(e, decimal) 
{
    var key;
    var keychar;

    if (window.event) 
        key = window.event.keyCode;
    else if (e) 
        key = e.which;
    else 
        return true;

    keychar = String.fromCharCode(key);

    if ((key==null) || (key==0) || (key==8) ||  (key==9) || (key==13) || (key==27))
       return true;     
    else if ((("0123456789").indexOf(keychar) > -1))
       return true;
    else if (decimal && (keychar == "."))
       return true;        
    else
       return false;
}

Edit: None of the solutions provided have solved my problem of allowing commands like ctrl-A while the text box is selected. That was the whole point of my asking here, so I have gone back to using my original script. Oh well.

share|improve this question
3  
If you're happy using HTML 5, imperfectly implemented, form type <input type="number" /> that can work. –  David Thomas Sep 21 '10 at 22:02
    
I wish i could use HTML 5. That was my first thought, and it would have saved me so much time looking up javascript :-p thanks anyway –  RobHardgood Sep 21 '10 at 22:13

20 Answers 20

This is something I made another time for just numbers, it will allow all the formatters as well.

jQuery

$('input').keypress(function(e) {
    var a = [];
    var k = e.which;

    for (i = 48; i < 58; i++)
        a.push(i);

    if (!(a.indexOf(k)>=0))
        e.preventDefault();
});​

Try it

http://jsfiddle.net/zpg8k/

As a note, you'll want to filter on submit/server side as well, for sake of pasting/context menu and browsers that don't support the paste event.

Edit to elaborate on multiple methods

I see you're bouncing around the 'accepted' answer, so I'll clear something up. You can really use any of the methods listed here, they all work. What I'd personally do is use mine for live client side filtering, and then on submit and server side use RegEx as suggested by others. However, no client side by itself will be 100% effective as there is nothing stopping me from putting document.getElementById('theInput').value = 'Hey, letters.'; in the console and bypassing any clientside verification (except for polling, but I could just cancel the setInterval from the console as well). Use whichever client side solution you like, but be sure you implement something on submit and server side as well.

Edit 2 - @Tim Down

Alright, per the comments I had to adjust two things I didn't think of. First, keypress instead of keydown, which has been updated, but the lack of indexOf in IE (seriously Microsoft!?) breaks the example above as well. Here's an alternative

$('input').keypress(function(e) {
    var a = [];
    var k = e.which;

    for (i = 48; i < 58; i++)
        a.push(i);

    if (!($.inArray(k,a)>=0))
        e.preventDefault();
});​

New jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/umNuB/

share|improve this answer
2  
The numbers are the formatters, backspace, shift etc etc etc. As you press a key it should show the keycode to the right, so you can play around and see what you want to allow and disallow. –  Robert Sep 21 '10 at 22:09
2  
Still allows me to right-click+paste text though. –  dogbane Sep 21 '10 at 22:24
4  
Don't use keydown or keyup for checking the character the user has typed. Any success you get will be coincidental and unreliable: a differently laid out keyboard or a keyboard from a culture other than your own will have different key mappings and your key codes will be useless. The only event that contains character information is keypress. –  Tim Down Sep 21 '10 at 23:50
1  
One other issue: in IE up to and including version 8, arrays don't have an indexOf method. –  Tim Down Sep 22 '10 at 0:11
1  
Hmm @Tim Down, full of helpful tidbits that make me hate IE more, adjusted again. –  Robert Sep 22 '10 at 0:23
     .keypress(function(e)
               {
                 var key_codes = [48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 0, 8];

                 if (!($.inArray(e.which, key_codes) >= 0)) {
                   e.preventDefault();
                 }
               });

You need Backspace and Delete keys too ;)

share|improve this answer
2  
I am befuddled that it's not included in the top answer. Perhaps an edit is necessary? –  th3byrdm4n Mar 25 '13 at 0:37

http://jsfiddle.net/PgHFp/

<html>
<head>
<title>Test</title>
<script language="javascript">
function checkInput(ob) {
  var invalidChars = /[^0-9]/gi
  if(invalidChars.test(ob.value)) {
            ob.value = ob.value.replace(invalidChars,"");
      }
}
</script>
</head>

<body>
    <input type="text" onkeyup="checkInput(this)"/>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This works great too! Thanks @fahd it even prevents pasting text –  RobHardgood Sep 21 '10 at 22:29
    
Keep in mind it won't prevent dragging text into the textbox, hence the need for onsubmit and server side verification. –  Robert Sep 21 '10 at 22:31
    
@Robert Indeed, I always have PHP form validation in case users have javascript turned off anyway. –  RobHardgood Sep 21 '10 at 22:35
    
For some reason, this isn't working when I use onkeyup... It works great when I use onkeypress, but that makes it check a character too late... –  RobHardgood Sep 22 '10 at 22:00
    
late comment: but how would you be able to make it enter float like .5 ect.? –  user3591637 15 hours ago

The only event that contains information about the character typed is keypress. Anything character-related you may infer from the keyCode property of keydown or keyup events is unreliable and dependent on a particular keyboard mapping. The following will prevent non-numeric keyboard input all major browsers by using the character obtained from the keypress event. It won't prevent the user from pasting or dragging non-numeric text in.

var input = document.getElementById("your_input");

input.onkeypress = function(evt) {
    evt = evt || window.event;
    if (!evt.ctrlKey && !evt.metaKey && !evt.altKey) {
        var charCode = (typeof evt.which == "undefined") ? evt.keyCode : evt.which;
        if (charCode && !/\d/.test(String.fromCharCode(charCode))) {
            return false;
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
@Tim Down this works well too, but again, it won't allow me to use functions like ctrl-A within the text box –  RobHardgood Sep 22 '10 at 21:58
    
@RobHargood, my comment explained why that's so, because Firefox passes ctrl-t etc etc as if you're pressing just t, there's no reliable way to completely block the t letter in Firefox while allowing control-t. You can be reactive instead of proactive if you want that functionality, using replace like some of the other examples here. –  Robert Sep 22 '10 at 22:07
    
Good point. I've updated my answer to check for the Ctrl key being pressed. –  Tim Down Sep 22 '10 at 22:20
    
Robert, you can entirely reliably distinguish between t and Ctrl-t using the ctrlKey property of the event. –  Tim Down Sep 22 '10 at 22:38
    
@TimDown, it's not working for me even when checking for control, Firefox on Mac for me is firing into the textfield as if it was only t being pressed. –  Robert Sep 23 '10 at 16:36

Maybe you are using bootstrap. If so, this may suffice:

<input type="text" data-mask="9999999"> 

Input mask

share|improve this answer
1  
This only works for fixed-length fields. For example, if you might store numbers from 1 to 1000, your users would have to type 0001. Not so friendly for that. Maybe for phone numbers, SSNs, etc. –  Matt Johnson Mar 10 '13 at 20:05

Just use regex to get rid of any non number characters whenever a key is pressed or the textbox loses focus.

var numInput;
window.onload = function () {   
    numInput = document.getElementById('numonly');
    numInput.onkeydown = numInput.onblur = numInput.onkeyup = function()
    {
        numInput.value = numInput.value.replace(/[^0-9]+/,"");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This still breaks Ctrl+A –  bobpaul Sep 1 '11 at 19:27

The following code is something I use extensively. I found the script in a forum, but modified and expanded it to accommodate my needs:

<script type="text/javascript">
    // Restrict user input in a text field
    // create as many regular expressions here as you need:
    var digitsOnly = /[1234567890]/g;
    var integerOnly = /[0-9\.]/g;
    var alphaOnly = /[A-Za-z]/g;
    var usernameOnly = /[0-9A-Za-z\._-]/g;

    function restrictInput(myfield, e, restrictionType, checkdot){
        if (!e) var e = window.event
        if (e.keyCode) code = e.keyCode;
        else if (e.which) code = e.which;
        var character = String.fromCharCode(code);

        // if user pressed esc... remove focus from field...
        if (code==27) { this.blur(); return false; }

        // ignore if the user presses other keys
        // strange because code: 39 is the down key AND ' key...
        // and DEL also equals .
        if (!e.ctrlKey && code!=9 && code!=8 && code!=36 && code!=37 && code!=38 && (code!=39 || (code==39 && character=="'")) && code!=40) {
            if (character.match(restrictionType)) {
                if(checkdot == "checkdot"){
                    return !isNaN(myfield.value.toString() + character);
                } else {
                    return true;
                }
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
</script>

Different usage methods would be:

<!-- To accept only alphabets -->
<input type="text" onkeypress="return restrictInput(this, event, alphaOnly);">
<!-- To accept only numbers without dot -->
<input type="text" onkeypress="return restrictInput(this, event, digitsOnly);">
<!-- To accept only numbers and dot -->
<input type="text" onkeypress="return restrictInput(this, event, integerOnly);">
<!-- To accept only numbers and only one dot -->
<input type="text" onkeypress="return restrictInput(this, event, integerOnly, 'checkdot');">
<!-- To accept only characters for a username field -->
<input type="text" onkeypress="return restrictInput(this, event, usernameOnly);">
share|improve this answer

I use this:

    oEl.keypress(function(ev)
    {
        var sKey = String.fromCharCode(ev.which);
        if (!sKey.match(/[0-9]/) || !sKey === "") 
            ev.preventDefault();            
    });

The advantage is, that every key which does not provide an input to the field is still allowed, so you don't have to worry about every single special key. Even combos like CTRL + R do still work.

EDIT As this is not working in Firefox I had to modify the function a little:

    oEl.keypress(function(ev)
    {
        var iKeyCode = ev.which || ev.keyCode;
        var aSpecialKeysForFirefox = [8, 9, 13, 27, 37, 38, 39, 40, 46];
        var sKey = String.fromCharCode(iKeyCode);
        if (sKey !== "" && $.inArray(iKeyCode, aSpecialKeysForFirefox ) < 0 && !sKey.match(/[0-9]/)) {
            ev.preventDefault();
        }
    });

Explanation All Browsers handle jquerys keypress event differently. To make it work in FF the $.inArray check is added. As firefoxs keypress-event doesn't trigger when combinations like strg+tab are used, but the others do, the key.match approach still adds a little value to the latter, as it enables those combinations.

share|improve this answer

This works in IE, Chrome AND Firefox:

<input type="text" onkeypress="return event.charCode === 0 || /\d/.test(String.fromCharCode(event.charCode));" />
share|improve this answer
1  
This is fantastic, although it could use a little explanation of what's going on. –  emodendroket Jun 24 at 15:15
1  
Check for NULL character then tests on digit regex "/\d/" –  saleemrashid1 Jun 29 at 15:38
    
Thank you. It's works for my screen validation. –  Amaris Jul 22 at 10:51

It's worth pointing out that no matter how tightly you manage to control this via the front end (Javascript, HTML, etc), you still need to validate it at the server, because there's nothing to stop a user from turning off javascript, or even deliberately posting junk to your form to try to hack you.

My advice: Use the HTML5 markup so that browsers which support it will use it. Also use the JQuery option previously suggested (the inital solution may have flaws, but it seems like the comments have been working through that). And then do server-side validation as well.

share|improve this answer

this will enable the numpad inputs also.

.keydown(function(event){                                     
    if(event.keyCode == 8 || event.keyCode == 46)             
        return true;                                         
    if(event.keyCode >= 96 && event.keyCode <= 105)           
        return true;                                          
    if(isNaN(parseInt(String.fromCharCode(event.keyCode),10)))
       return false;                                          
}); 
share|improve this answer
    
perfect ! Exactly what i was looking for. Shift+1 was still coming up –  Mulki May 3 '13 at 11:47

Add <script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.numeric.js"></script> then use

 $("element").numeric({ decimal: false, negative: false });
share|improve this answer

shorter way and easy to understand:

$('#someID').keypress(function(e) { 
    var k = e.which;
    if (k <= 48 || k >= 58) {e.preventDefault()};
});
share|improve this answer

This is my plugin for that case:

 (function( $ ) {
    $.fn.numbers = function(options) {
      $(this).keypress(function(evt){
          var setting = $.extend( {
                'digits' : 8
              }, options);
          if($(this).val().length > (setting.digits - 1) && evt.which != 8){
              evt.preventDefault(); 
          }
          else{
              if(evt.which < 48 || evt.which > 57){
                if(evt.keyCode != 8){
                    evt.preventDefault();  
                }
              }
          }
      });
    };
  })( jQuery );

Use:

 $('#limin').numbers({digits:3});
 $('#limax').numbers();
share|improve this answer

In order to block anything but numbers from being input into a text field but still allowing for other buttons to work (such as delete, shift, tab, etc.) look at a reference of the Javascript key codes; anything from 65 on up (to 222) can be blocked.

Using Jquery and Javascript, that would look like:

$('#textFieldId').keydown(function(event) {
    if ( event.keyCode > 64 ) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});

The key codes will be the same in Javascript whether or not Jquery is used.

share|improve this answer
    
(event.keyCode > 57) works as well –  mccallbear Jun 5 '13 at 0:15

There is my current solution of numeric input, need to test in different browsers but seems to work

Support comma and period delimiter (czech native is comma), space and numpad/keyboard numbers input. Allow Ctrl+C Ctrl+A or Ctrl+X, arrow navigation and delete block Ctrl+V. React on escape key by blurring input.

Watch my Coffee script:

(($) ->
  $.fn.onlyNumbers = ->
    @each ->
      $(@).keydown (e) ->
        # get code of key
        code = if e.keyCode then e.keyCode else e.which

        return $(@).blur() if code is 27 # blur on escape
        return if code in [46, 8, 9, 13] # 46, 8, 9, 27, 13 = backspace, delete, tab, escape, and enter
        return if (e.ctrlKey or e.metaKey) and code in [65, 67, 88] # ctrl|command + [a, c, x]
        return if code in [96..105] # numpad numbers
        return if code in [48..57] # numbers on keyboard
        return if code in [35..39] # 35..39 - home, end, left, right
        return if code in [188, 190, 32] # comma, period, space
        return if code in [44] # comma, period,

        e.returnValue = false # IE hate you
        e.preventDefault();

      $(@).keypress (e) ->
        code = if e.keyCode then e.keyCode else e.which
        return if code in [44, 46, 32] # comma, period, space
        return if code in [48..57] # numbers on keyboard
        e.returnValue = false # IE hate you
        e.preventDefault();

) jQuery

You can get compiled Javascript here http://goo.gl/SbyhXN

share|improve this answer

My functions:

$('.input_integer_only').on('input', function(e) {
    $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/[^0-9]/g, ''));
});


$('.input_float_only').on('input', function(e) {
    var $var = $(this).val().replace(/[^0-9\.]/g, '');
    var $aVar = $var.split('.');

    if($aVar.length > 2) {
        $var = $aVar[0] + '.' + $aVar[1];
    }

    $(this).val($var);
});
share|improve this answer

Here is my solution: a combination of the working ones below.

var checkInput = function(e) {
        if (!e) {
            e = window.event;
        }

        var code = e.keyCode || e.which;

        if (!e.ctrlKey) {

            //46, 8, 9, 27, 13 = backspace, delete, tab, escape, and enter
            if (code == 8 || code == 13 || code == 9 || code == 27 || code == 46)
                return true;
            //35..39 - home, end, left, right
            if (code >= 35 && code <= 39)
                return true;
            //numpad numbers
            if (code >= 96 && code <= 105)
                return true;
            //keyboard numbers
            if (isNaN(parseInt(String.fromCharCode(code), 10))) {
                e.preventDefault();
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    };
share|improve this answer

You can make changes to accept the keycode for Ctrl keys: 17, 18, 19, 20. Then your code will be like:

function numbersonly(e, decimal) {
var key;
var keychar;

if (window.event) 
    key = window.event.keyCode;
else if (e) 
    key = e.which;
else 
    return true;

keychar = String.fromCharCode(key);

if ((key==null) || (key==0) || (key==8) ||  (key==9) || (key==13) || (key==27) || (key==17) || (key==18) || (key==19) || (key==20))
   return true;     
else if ((("0123456789").indexOf(keychar) > -1))
   return true;
else if (decimal && (keychar == "."))
   return true;        
else
   return false;
}
share|improve this answer
private void txtAddressKeyTyped(java.awt.event.KeyEvent evt) {                                  
    if (String.valueOf(evt.getKeyChar()).matches("\\W")) {
            evt.consume();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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