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I have a MySQL table with coordinates, the column names are X and Y. Now I want to swap the column values in this table, so that X becomes Y and Y becomes X. The most apparent solution would be renaming the columns, but I don't want to make structure changes since I don't necessarily have permissions to do that.

Is this possible to do with UPDATE in some way? UPDATE table SET X=Y, Y=X obviously won't do what I want.


Edit: Please note that my restriction on permissions, mentioned above, effectively prevents the use of ALTER TABLE or other commands that change the table/database structure. Renaming columns or adding new ones are unfortunately not options.

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14 Answers 14

up vote 71 down vote accepted

I just had to deal with the same and I'll summarize my findings.

  1. The UPDATE table SET X=Y, Y=X approach obviously doesn't work, as it'll just set both values to Y.

  2. Here's a method that uses a temporary variable. Thanks to Antony from the comments of http://beerpla.net/2009/02/17/swapping-column-values-in-mysql/ for the "IS NOT NULL" tweak. Without it, the query works unpredictably. See the table schema at the end of the post. This method doesn't swap the values if one of them is NULL. Use method #3 that doesn't have this limitation.

    UPDATE swap_test SET x=y, y=@temp WHERE (@temp:=x) IS NOT NULL;

  3. This method was offered by Dipin in, yet again, the comments of http://beerpla.net/2009/02/17/swapping-column-values-in-mysql/. I think it’s the most elegant and clean solution. It works with both NULL and non-NULL values.

    UPDATE swap_test SET x=(@temp:=x), x = y, y = @temp;

  4. Another approach I came up with that seems to work:

    UPDATE swap_test s1, swap_test s2 SET s1.x=s1.y, s1.y=s2.x WHERE s1.id=s2.id;

Essentially, the 1st table is the one getting updated and the 2nd one is used to pull the old data from.
Note that this approach requires a primary key to be present.

This is my test schema:

CREATE TABLE `swap_test` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `x` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `y` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

INSERT INTO `swap_test` VALUES ('1', 'a', '10');
INSERT INTO `swap_test` VALUES ('2', NULL, '20');
INSERT INTO `swap_test` VALUES ('3', 'c', NULL);
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8  
As noted in MySQL docs, It's not safe to assign and read variables in a single statement. The order of operations is not guaranteed. So the only safe method is #4 –  AMIB Jan 27 '13 at 10:01
    
Option 4 worked for me. You can obviously add more conditions to the where clause if you need to swap the columns for only some rows. –  Brad Mar 1 '13 at 18:51
1  
You know, I never thought there'd be a practical use for that stupid interview question asking to swap two variables without using a temporary, but here it is, and for integers this would actually work: update swap_test set x=x+y,y=x-y,x=x-y; –  izak Sep 15 '14 at 13:15
    
Most of this answer is direct copy/paste from beerpla.net/2009/02/17/swapping-column-values-in-mysql –  Jhawins May 25 at 16:18
    
@Jhawins That's because beerpla.net is my blog. –  Artem Russakovskii May 26 at 21:26
up vote 11 down vote
+100

You could take the sum and subtract the opposing value using X and Y

UPDATE swaptest SET X=X+Y,Y=X-Y,X=X-Y;

Here is a sample test (and it works with negative numbers)

mysql> use test
Database changed
mysql> drop table if exists swaptest;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.03 sec)

mysql> create table swaptest (X int,Y int);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.12 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO swaptest VALUES (1,2),(3,4),(-5,-8),(-13,27);
Query OK, 4 rows affected (0.08 sec)
Records: 4  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> SELECT * FROM swaptest;
+------+------+
| X    | Y    |
+------+------+
|    1 |    2 |
|    3 |    4 |
|   -5 |   -8 |
|  -13 |   27 |
+------+------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

Here is the swap being performed

mysql> UPDATE swaptest SET X=X+Y,Y=X-Y,X=X-Y;
Query OK, 4 rows affected (0.07 sec)
Rows matched: 4  Changed: 4  Warnings: 0

mysql> SELECT * FROM swaptest;
+------+------+
| X    | Y    |
+------+------+
|    2 |    1 |
|    4 |    3 |
|   -8 |   -5 |
|   27 |  -13 |
+------+------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

Give it a Try !!!

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1  
For the numbers it's indeed a neatest one. –  Your Common Sense Apr 23 '14 at 16:15
    
@YourCommonSense Your bounty says Ronaldo when it is in fact Rolando. –  BeatAlex Apr 24 '14 at 15:46

The following code works for all scenarios in my quick testing:

UPDATE table swap_test
   SET x=(@temp:=x), x = y, y = @temp
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UPDATE table SET X=Y, Y=X will do precisely what you want (edit: in PostgreSQL, not MySQL, see below). The values are taken from the old row and assigned to a new copy of the same row, then the old row is replaced. You do not have to resort to using a temporary table, a temporary column, or other swap tricks.

@D4V360: I see. That is shocking and unexpected. I use PostgreSQL and my answer works correctly there (I tried it). See the PostgreSQL UPDATE docs (under Parameters, expression), where it mentions that expressions on the right hand side of SET clauses explicitly use the old values of columns. I see that the corresponding MySQL UPDATE docs contain the statement "Single-table UPDATE assignments are generally evaluated from left to right" which implies the behaviour you describe.

Good to know.

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Thanks Greg and D4V360, good to know the differences in PostgreSQL and MySQL about the behavior of the update queries. –  Vijay Dev Oct 25 '08 at 16:41
    
The "x=y, y=x" approach also works in Oracle, for what it's worth. –  Burhan Ali Oct 17 '12 at 16:52
1  
I used PostgreSQL and SET X=Y, Y=X saved me :) –  Anonymous Jun 28 '13 at 10:00
1  
IMHO this answer is a mess - bad advice with "oops never mind" appended. Half of it should be a comment and the only part of the remainder that's relevant to the question is the link to MySQL docs... –  Air Jan 27 '14 at 22:57

Two alternatives 1. Use a temporary table 2. Investigate the XOR algorithm

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Ok, so just for fun, you could do this! (assuming you're swapping string values)

mysql> select * from swapper;
+------+------+
| foo  | bar  |
+------+------+
| 6    | 1    | 
| 5    | 2    | 
| 4    | 3    | 
+------+------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> update swapper set 
    -> foo = concat(foo, "###", bar),
    -> bar = replace(foo, concat("###", bar), ""),
    -> foo = replace(foo, concat(bar, "###"), "");

Query OK, 3 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 3  Changed: 3  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from swapper;
+------+------+
| foo  | bar  |
+------+------+
| 1    | 6    | 
| 2    | 5    | 
| 3    | 4    | 
+------+------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

A nice bit of fun abusing the left-to-right evaluation process in MySQL.

Alternatively, just use XOR if they're numbers. You mentioned coordinates, so do you have lovely integer values, or complex strings?

Edit: The XOR stuff works like this by the way:

update swapper set foo = foo ^ bar, bar = foo ^ bar, foo = foo ^ bar;
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ALTER TABLE table ADD COLUMN tmp;
UPDATE table SET tmp = X;
UPDATE table SET X = Y;
UPDATE table SET Y = tmp;
ALTER TABLE table DROP COLUMN tmp;
Something like this?

Edit: About Greg's comment: No, this doesn't work:

mysql> select * from test;
+------+------+
| x    | y    |
+------+------+
|    1 |    2 |
|    3 |    4 |
+------+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> update test set x=y, y=x; Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec) Rows matched: 2 Changed: 2 Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from test; +------+------+ | x | y | +------+------+ | 2 | 2 | | 4 | 4 | +------+------+ 2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

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Just for the record: This does work in PostgreSQL while it does not work in MySQL. –  str Oct 19 '11 at 22:05

This surely works! I've just needed it to swap Euro and SKK price columns. :)

UPDATE tbl SET X=Y, Y=@temp where @temp:=X;

The above will not work (ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax)

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I believe have a intermediate exchange variable is the best practice in such way:

update z set c1 = @c := c1, c1 = c2, c2 = @c

First, it works always; second, it works regardless of data type.

Despite of Both

update z set c1 = c1 ^ c2, c2 = c1 ^ c2, c1 = c1 ^ c2

and

update z set c1 = c1 + c2, c2 = c1 - c2, c1 = c1 - c2

are working usually, only for number data type by the way, and it is your responsibility to prevent overflow, you can not use XOR between signed and unsigned, you also can not use sum for overflowing possibility.

And

update z set c1 = c2, c2 = @c where @c := c1

is not working if c1 is 0 or NULL or zero length string or just spaces.

We need change it to

update z set c1 = c2, c2 = @c where if((@c := c1), true, true)

Here is the scripts:

mysql> create table z (c1 int, c2 int)
    -> ;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

mysql> insert into z values(0, 1), (-1, 1), (pow(2, 31) - 1, pow(2, 31) - 2)
    -> ;
Query OK, 3 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 3  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from z;
+------------+------------+
| c1         | c2         |
+------------+------------+
|          0 |          1 |
|         -1 |          1 |
| 2147483647 | 2147483646 |
+------------+------------+
3 rows in set (0.02 sec)

mysql> update z set c1 = c1 ^ c2, c2 = c1 ^ c2, c1 = c1 ^ c2;
ERROR 1264 (22003): Out of range value for column 'c1' at row 2
mysql> update z set c1 = c1 + c2, c2 = c1 - c2, c1 = c1 - c2;
ERROR 1264 (22003): Out of range value for column 'c1' at row 3

mysql> select * from z;
+------------+------------+
| c1         | c2         |
+------------+------------+
|          0 |          1 |
|          1 |         -1 |
| 2147483646 | 2147483647 |
+------------+------------+
3 rows in set (0.02 sec)

mysql> update z set c1 = c2, c2 = @c where @c := c1;
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 2  Changed: 2  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from z;
+------------+------------+
| c1         | c2         |
+------------+------------+
|          0 |          1 |
|         -1 |          1 |
| 2147483647 | 2147483646 |
+------------+------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from z;
+------------+------------+
| c1         | c2         |
+------------+------------+
|          1 |          0 |
|          1 |         -1 |
| 2147483646 | 2147483647 |
+------------+------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> update z set c1 = @c := c1, c1 = c2, c2 = @c;
Query OK, 3 rows affected (0.02 sec)
Rows matched: 3  Changed: 3  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from z;
+------------+------------+
| c1         | c2         |
+------------+------------+
|          0 |          1 |
|         -1 |          1 |
| 2147483647 | 2147483646 |
+------------+------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>update z set c1 = c2, c2 = @c where if((@c := c1), true, true);
Query OK, 3 rows affected (0.02 sec)
Rows matched: 3  Changed: 3  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from z;
+------------+------------+
| c1         | c2         |
+------------+------------+
|          1 |          0 |
|          1 |         -1 |
| 2147483646 | 2147483647 |
+------------+------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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+1 for finally finding a good use for the stupid interview question where you have to swap two variables without a temporary ;-) –  izak Sep 15 '14 at 13:16

Assuming you have signed integers in your columns, you may need to use CAST(a ^ b AS SIGNED), since the result of the ^ operator is an unsigned 64-bit integer in MySQL.

In case it helps anyone, here's the method I used to swap the same column between two given rows:

SELECT BIT_XOR(foo) FROM table WHERE key = $1 OR key = $2

UPDATE table SET foo = CAST(foo ^ $3 AS SIGNED) WHERE key = $1 OR key = $2

where $1 and $2 are the keys of two rows and $3 is the result of the first query.

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I've not tried it but

UPDATE tbl SET @temp=X, X=Y, Y=@temp

Might do it.

Mark

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You could change column names, but this is more of a hack. But be cautious of any indexes that may be on these columns

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Swapping of column values using single query

UPDATE my_table SET a=@tmp:=a, a=b, b=@tmp;

cheers...!

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CREATE TABLE Names ( F_NAME VARCHAR(22), L_NAME VARCHAR(22) );

INSERT INTO Names VALUES('Ashutosh', 'Singh'),('Anshuman','Singh'),('Manu', 'Singh');

UPDATE Names N1 , Names N2 SET N1.F_NAME = N2.L_NAME , N1.L_NAME = N2.F_NAME WHERE N1.F_NAME = N2.F_NAME;

SELECT * FROM Names;

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