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I'm trying to determine the working area of the desktop even when the taskbar is hidden.

I have two Rectangles, the screen's bounds and the taskbar's bounds. I need to subtract the taskbar's bounds Rectangle from the screen Rectangle to determine the available working area of the desktop. Basically, I want to come up with Screen.WorkingArea except when the taskbar is hidden.

Say the screen rectangle X,Y,W,H = 0,0,1680,1050 and the taskbar X,Y,W,H is 0,1010,1680,40. I need to subtract the second from the first to determine that the working area is 0,0,1680,1010.

The taskbar can be on either of the four sides of the screen and I know there's got to be a better method than determining where the taskbar is and then having a separate line of code to generate a new Rectangle for each of the four possible positions.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure there's a better method than the one you mentioned. The problem is that in the general case, subtracting a rectangular region from another is going to leave a hole somewhere in between, so the result isn't really a rectangle. In your case, you know that the taskbar fits exactly on one of the sides of the screen rectangle, so the "best" way is indeed figuring out which side it is and subtracting the width/height from that side.

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I've settled on having to do it that way. I was hoping for a more elegant mathematical approach, but this method works just fine. –  Chris Thompson Sep 22 '10 at 0:27

Unless 3 sides of the rectangles are coincident, subtracting one rectangle from another will end up with a shape that is not a rectangle, so a general solution to 'subtract rectangles' doesn't really make much sense.

Solution for 3 sides coincident:

Given rectangles (Ax, Ay, Aw, Ah) and (Bx, By, Bw, Bh):

(max(Ax, Bx), max(Ay, By), min(Ax + Aw, Bx + Bw) - max(Ax, Bx), min(Ay + Ah, By + Bh) - max(Ay, By)

Edited.

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1  
Grah, this has a problem, it's the intersection not the difference. –  Forrest Voight Sep 21 '10 at 23:47

I guess I'm confused as to what you're attempting to derive. .NET reports the current working area of the desktop as the resolution of the monitor minus the space consumed by the Taskbar.

  • If the Taskbar is not hidden, the desktop's working area is the entire resolution of the monitor minus the size of the Taskbar.
  • If the Taskbar is set to hidden, the desktop's working area is the entire resolution of the monitor.
  • If the Taskbar is docked to the top or left, the desktop's working area is the entire resolution of the monitor minus the size of the taskbar and then shifted in the X/Y direction as appropriate.

Determining the working area of the screen is exposed in .NET already (including the shifting X/Y coordinates when the Taskbar is docked to the top or left.

     // set the coordinate to the upper-left of the screen
     Rectangle r = Screen.GetWorkingArea(new Point(0, 0));

     // the resulting rectangle will show the deviation in X/Y
     // and also the dimensions of the desktop (minus the Taskbar)
     MessageBox.Show
     (
        r.ToString()
     );
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Yes, I know that. I need to know the visible desktop area when the taskbar is showing even when auto-hide is enabled. If auto-hide is enabled, and the taskbar is showing, the WorkingArea is still the entire desktop, and my popup gets covered up by the taskbar. I need to move my popup to be above the taskbar when it's showing either with auto-hide on or off. –  Chris Thompson Sep 22 '10 at 6:38
    
Okay, I'm not going to ask why you would want that behavior. But your reply is more clear that regardless of the Taskbar's position (even during auto-hide) - you want to be in the EFFECTIVE working area if the Taskbar was shown. I suggest a Win32 call (via P/Invoke) to toggle the auto-hide of the taskbar TWICE (thus reverting it to the original setting), taking the smaller of the two rectangles. –  Michael Sep 22 '10 at 14:07

This matrix shows what happens in each case:

in all cases: sX = 0; sY = 0; sW = width; sH = height; 
north: tX = 0;          tY = 0;          tW = sW;    tH = sizeH;   wX = 0;     wY = tH; wW = sW;         wH = sH - sizeH;   sizeW=0,    sizeH=size
south: tX = 0;          tY = sH - sizeH; tW = sW;    tH = sizeH;   wX = 0;     wY = 0;  wW = sW;         wH = sH - sizeH;   sizeW=0,    sizeH=size
east : tX = 0;          tY = 0;          tW = sizeW; tH = sH;      wX = sizeW; wY = 0;  wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH        ;   sizeW=size, sizeH=0
west : tX = sW - sizeW; tY = 0;          tW = sizeW; tH = sH;      wX = 0;     wY = 0;  wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH        ;   sizeW=size, sizeH=0

which we can generalize into:

in all cases: sX = 0; sY = 0; sW = width; sH = height; 
north: tX = 0;          tY = 0;          tW = sW;    tH = sizeH;   wX = 0;  wY = tH; wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH - sizeH;   sizeW=0,     sizeH=value
south: tX = 0;          tY = sH - sizeH; tW = sW;    tH = sizeH;   wX = 0;  wY = 0;  wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH - sizeH;   sizeW=0,     sizeH=value
east : tX = 0;          tY = 0;          tW = sizeW; tH = sH;      wX = tW; wY = 0;  wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH - sizeH;   sizeW=value, sizeH=0
west : tX = sW - sizeW; tY = 0;          tW = sizeW; tH = sH;      wX = 0;  wY = 0;  wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH - sizeH;   sizeW=value, sizeH=0

the matrix revealed this algorithm:

if (east/west)   sizeW = tW;  else   sizeW = 0; 
if (north/south) sizeH = tH;  else   sizeH = 0;
wX = 0; wY = 0; wW = sW - sizeW; wH = sH - sizeH;
if (east)  wX = sizeW;
if (north) wY = sizeH;

which in C/C++/Java and other similar languages can be written as:

sizeW = (tH == sH) ? tW : 0; 
sizeH = (tW == sW) ? tH : 0;
wX = (sizeH == 0 && tX == 0) ? sizeW : 0; 
wY = (sizeW == 0 && tY == 0) ? sizeH : 0; 
wW = sW - sizeW; 
wH = sH - sizeH;

This seems to be correct for the case you've given. I haven't re-checked for the other cases though, so I may have made a mistake.

EDIT:

after a bit more thinking, I think I found the optimum selection:

wW = sW - ((tH == sH) ? tW : 0); 
wH = sH - ((tW == sW) ? tH : 0);
wX = (wH == sH && tX == 0) ? tW : 0; 
wY = (wW == sW && tY == 0) ? tH : 0; 
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I'll give it a shot, though I don't think it saves me any lines of code =) –  Chris Thompson Sep 22 '10 at 6:39
    
@Chris Thompson: you can collade sizeW and sizeH calculation into wX,wY,wW, and wH; however that means you will be calculating each of them 3 times instead of once. PS: don't put this into production code; you'll regret it later. –  Lie Ryan Sep 22 '10 at 7:27
    
@Chris Thompson: does my latest update save you more code now (4-lines and no repeated subexpressions)? I believe this could be the most optimal code, though don't quote me on that. –  Lie Ryan Sep 22 '10 at 10:32

You can use a System.Drawing.Region. This has an Exclude-method that takes a System.Drawing.Rectanlge as a parameter and has some nifty other features.

Getting your result will be slightly more difficult.. I think you can only test for visibility with regions, or you could get its bounds - but you would have to define your own Graphics for that (and I would not know what parameters to use here).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.drawing.region_methods.aspx

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Assuming rectangle 2 is contained in rectangle 1 (if not, use the intersection of both rectangles as the rectangle 2):

-------------------------
|      rectangle 1      |
|                       |
|     -------------     |
|     |rectangle 2|     |
|     -------------     |
|                       |
|                       |
-------------------------

If you subtracted rectangle 2 from rectangle 1, you will get an area with a hole:

-------------------------
|                       |
|                       |
|     -------------     |
|     |    hole   |     |
|     -------------     |
|                       |
|                       |
-------------------------

This area can be decomposed into 4 rectangles:

-------------------------
|          A            |
|                       |
|-----------------------|
|  B  |   hole    |  C  |
|-----------------------|
|                       |
|          D            |
-------------------------

If rectangles are 3 sides coincident, you will get 1 rectangle from the subtracted area (which is your case). In general, you will get at most 4 rectangles.

The implementation in objective-c (sorry, don't have visual studio at this moment):

// returns the rectangles which are part of rect1 but not part of rect2
NSArray* rectSubtract(CGRect rect1, CGRect rect2)
{
    if (CGRectIsEmpty(rect1)) {
        return @[];
    }
    CGRect intersectedRect = CGRectIntersection(rect1, rect2);

    // No intersection
    if (CGRectIsEmpty(intersectedRect)) {
        return @[[NSValue valueWithCGRect:rect1]];
    }

    NSMutableArray* results = [NSMutableArray new];

    CGRect remainder;
    CGRect subtractedArea;
    subtractedArea = rectBetween(rect1, intersectedRect, &remainder, CGRectMaxYEdge);

    if (!CGRectIsEmpty(subtractedArea)) {
        [results addObject:[NSValue valueWithCGRect:subtractedArea]];
    }

    subtractedArea = rectBetween(remainder, intersectedRect, &remainder, CGRectMinYEdge);
    if (!CGRectIsEmpty(subtractedArea)) {
        [results addObject:[NSValue valueWithCGRect:subtractedArea]];
    }

    subtractedArea = rectBetween(remainder, intersectedRect, &remainder, CGRectMaxXEdge);
    if (!CGRectIsEmpty(subtractedArea)) {
        [results addObject:[NSValue valueWithCGRect:subtractedArea]];
    }

    subtractedArea = rectBetween(remainder, intersectedRect, &remainder, CGRectMinXEdge);
    if (!CGRectIsEmpty(subtractedArea)) {
        [results addObject:[NSValue valueWithCGRect:subtractedArea]];
    }

    return results;
}

// returns the area between rect1 and rect2 along the edge
CGRect rectBetween(CGRect rect1, CGRect rect2, CGRect* remainder, CGRectEdge edge)
{
    CGRect intersectedRect = CGRectIntersection(rect1, rect2);
    if (CGRectIsEmpty(intersectedRect)) {
        return CGRectNull;
    }

    CGRect rect3;
    float chopAmount = 0;
    switch (edge) {
        case CGRectMaxYEdge:
            chopAmount = rect1.size.height - (intersectedRect.origin.y - rect1.origin.y);
            if (chopAmount > rect1.size.height) { chopAmount = rect1.size.height; }
            break;
        case CGRectMinYEdge:
            chopAmount = rect1.size.height - (CGRectGetMaxY(rect1) - CGRectGetMaxY(intersectedRect));
            if (chopAmount > rect1.size.height) { chopAmount = rect1.size.height; }
            break;
        case CGRectMaxXEdge:
            chopAmount = rect1.size.width - (intersectedRect.origin.x - rect1.origin.x);
            if (chopAmount > rect1.size.width) { chopAmount = rect1.size.width; }
            break;
        case CGRectMinXEdge:
            chopAmount = rect1.size.width - (CGRectGetMaxX(rect1) - CGRectGetMaxX(intersectedRect));
            if (chopAmount > rect1.size.width) { chopAmount = rect1.size.width; }
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }

    CGRectDivide(rect1, remainder, &rect3, chopAmount, edge);

    return rect3;
}
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And here is function in ActionScript. It will return a new rectangle, which does not overlap any rectangles is supplied rectangles list. All overlapped parts of rectangle rect will be subtracted.

private function reduceRectangle(rectangles:Vector.<Rectangle>, rect:Rectangle):Rectangle
{
    var rn:Rectangle = rect.clone();

    for each (var r:Rectangle in rectangles)
    {
        //outside
        if (r.x >= rn.right || r.y >= rn.bottom || r.right <= rn.x || r.bottom <= rn.y)
        {
            continue;
        }

        //within
        if (r.x <= rn.x && r.y <= rn.y && r.right >= rn.right && r.bottom >= rn.bottom)
        {
            return new Rectangle();
        }

        //clip right side
        if (r.x > rn.x && r.x < rn.right && r.y <= rn.y && r.bottom >= rn.bottom)
        {
            rn.width = r.x - rn.x;
        }

        //clip bottom side
        if (r.y > rn.y && r.y < rn.bottom && r.x <= rn.x && r.right >= rn.right)
        {
            rn.height = r.y - rn.y;
        }

        //clip left side
        if (r.x <= rn.x && r.right < rn.right && r.y <= rn.y && r.bottom >= rn.bottom)
        {
            var width:Number = rn.right - r.right;
            rn.x = r.right;
            rn.width = width;
        }

        //clip top side
        if (r.y <= rn.y && r.bottom < rn.bottom && r.x <= rn.x && r.right >= rn.right)
        {
            var height:Number = rn.bottom - r.bottom;
            rn.y = r.bottom;
            rn.height = height;
        }
    }

    return rn;
}
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