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I've got a generic type:

class DictionaryComparer<TKey, TValue> : IEqualityComparer<IDictionary<TKey, TValue>>

And a factory method that will (should) create an instance of this class for a given dictionary type.

    private static IEqualityComparer<T> CreateDictionaryComparer<T>()
    {
        Type def = typeof(DictionaryComparer<,>);
        Debug.Assert(typeof(T).IsGenericType);
        Debug.Assert(typeof(T).GetGenericArguments().Length == 2);

        Type t = def.MakeGenericType(typeof(T).GetGenericArguments());

        return (IEqualityComparer<T>)Activator.CreateInstance(t);
    }

Stripping away all of the extraneous stuff - even this code throws the same exception.

private static object CreateDictionaryComparer()
{
    Type def = typeof(DictionaryComparer<,>);

    Type t = def.MakeGenericType(new Type[] { typeof(String), typeof(object) });

    return Activator.CreateInstance(t);
}

The Asserts pass so I know that T is generic and has two generic arguments. The line with MakeGenericType however excepts with: "The number of generic arguments provided doesn't equal the arity of the generic type definition. Parameter name: instantiation"

I've done this sort of thing in the past and for the life of me can't figure out why this isn't working in this case. (plus I had to Google arity).

share|improve this question
    
What are you passing as T to CreateDictionaryComparer? I've tried passing CreateDictionaryComparer<IDictionary<string, string>>() and this works fine for me (using Mono C# compiler version 1.9.1.0). –  Richard Cook Sep 22 '10 at 3:10
    
I had DictionaryComparer as an inner class to one that is itself generic. Think that was hosing up the works. –  dkackman Sep 22 '10 at 3:14
    
Just out of curiosity, could you provide the full (failing) sample so I can try it on my compiler? –  Richard Cook Sep 22 '10 at 3:18
    
@Richard - see below –  dkackman Sep 22 '10 at 3:27
    
Thanks! I appreciate it. –  Richard Cook Sep 22 '10 at 3:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Figured it out.

I had DictionaryComparer declared as an inner class. I can only assume that MakeGenericType wanted to make a Query<T>.DictionaryComparer<string,object> and was not provided T.

Failing code

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var q = new Query<int>();
        q.CreateError();
    }
}

public class Query<TSource>
{
    public Query()
    {    
    }

    public object CreateError()
    {
        Type def = typeof(DictionaryComparer<,>);

        Type t = def.MakeGenericType(new Type[] { typeof(String), typeof(object) });

        return Activator.CreateInstance(t);
    }

    class DictionaryComparer<TKey, TValue> : IEqualityComparer<IDictionary<TKey, TValue>>
    {
        public DictionaryComparer()
        {
        }

        public bool Equals(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> x, IDictionary<TKey, TValue> y)
        {
            if (x.Count != y.Count)
                return false;

            return GetHashCode(x) == GetHashCode(y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> obj)
        {
            int hash = 0;
            unchecked
            {
                foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> pair in obj)
                {
                    int key = pair.Key.GetHashCode();
                    int value = pair.Value != null ? pair.Value.GetHashCode() : 0;
                    hash ^= key ^ value;
                }
            }
            return hash;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just out of curiosity, could you provide the full (failing) sample so I can try it on my compiler? –  Richard Cook Sep 22 '10 at 3:16
    
Lemme see if I can strip unrelated stuff out to a compilable example –  dkackman Sep 22 '10 at 3:18
    
Thanks! Moving DictionaryComparer<TKey, TValue> outside the generic container class Query<TSource> fixes the issue. I experimented and you can nest DictionaryComparer<TKey, TValue>, just not inside another generic class. Also wanted to make sure my compiler and runtime environment were behaving the same as yours. –  Richard Cook Sep 22 '10 at 3:32
    
Mine is vs.net 2010 and .net 4. –  dkackman Sep 22 '10 at 3:36
1  
As a further experiment providing three types new Type[] { typeof(int), typeof(String), typeof(object) } also works, satisfying the need to make a concrete type for the containing class (though removing the inner class is the better solution) –  dkackman Sep 22 '10 at 3:39

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