Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Inside of large companies, is it standard practice to use SSL (e.g. https) for running corporate apps over the LAN. I am thinking of ERP systems, SFA systems, HR systems, etc. But I am also thinking of SOA...web service providers and consumers.

In other words, is there any concern that something on the LAN could be sniffing plaintext info going around? If not SSL, how is this security threat dealt with?

What's your experience?

share|improve this question
    
Incidentally, this should be a wiki. There is no way to definitively answer the questions posed. –  Chris Lively Sep 22 '10 at 3:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inside of large companies, is it standard practice to use SSL (e.g. https) for running corporate apps over the LAN.

Generally SSL for LAN only internal applications is not common practice. Historically the LAN has been viewed as a "trusted" network, and so SSL for LAN apps hasn't been a priority.

Also, connection to internal application servers is usually via an authenticated proxy, which in itself mitigates some of the risk.

This is, slowly, changing however as organisations (generally) increasingly treat the LAN with less trust.

If not SSL, how is this security threat dealt with?

Most enterprises do monitor what is attached to their LAN and record events when new devices are added.

If the device doesn't correspond to something planned (i.e a new desktop or printer) - then it is investigated.

Unauthorised devices are seen as a much greater risk (than not using SSL) because they pose additional threats, like introducing a virus, an external network connection, or some other kind of attack vector.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand proxies, but can you elaborate on the authenticated proxy? Is it an SSO server/approach? The reason I ask is because without SSL, what keeps users from sending username/password in plaintext to the servers when they log in? –  HDave Sep 22 '10 at 5:13
    
nothin stops the users form sending username/password in plaintext... it's just that there are other layers of control which prevent someone from being able to use those credentials. By proxy server I mean like Microsoft ISA server, or whatever it's called these days, Bluecoat is another one. Basically web app servers are in a firewalled network zone. The firewall ensures that the only way to access the web app servers is via an approved proxy. So you have to be able to authenticate to the proxy (that's usually done in these environments using SPNEGO). –  Rich Sep 22 '10 at 10:01
    
BTW: Your question asked what is standard practice. This is standard practice.... It might not be the most secure solution, but it is pretty standard practice and certainly not unprofessional. –  Rich Sep 22 '10 at 10:04

It really depends on what you consider a "large company". The company I work at has over 50,000 employees; thus our corporate network is really not a great deal more trustable than the Internet.

We do use SSL on corporate Intranet web applications. We have our own internal CA certificate installed on all corporate PCs, so we can issue our own internal SSL certificates in-house.

share|improve this answer

Unfortunately, no it's not standard practice.

share|improve this answer

What's done and what should be done are not necessarily the same here...

Without a doubt any system with confidential information should be secured, especially on a LAN, as that's where most attacks originate - disgruntles employees etc etc.

unfortunately, it's often not the case.

share|improve this answer

Yep, pretty standard practice in a lot of places I've seen.

I think the reasons why should be obvious:

  • Extra security against common attacks
  • Pretty much no reason not to
share|improve this answer

Inside of large companies, is it standard practice to use SSL (e.g. https) for running corporate apps over the LAN. I am thinking of ERP systems, SFA systems, HR systems, etc. But I am also thinking of SOA...web service providers and consumers.

I would feel very uncomfortable if such apps weren't secured. In many place I've worked, they were. In some other, they weren't and I consider this as unprofessional.

In other words, is there any concern that something on the LAN could be sniffing plaintext info going around?

For me, the answer is obviously YES.

If not SSL, how is this security threat dealt with?

One Time Password (with RSA SecureID).

share|improve this answer

I wonder if one of the problems is that going to SSL always seems just a bit more complicated than it should be. If one could enable SSL with a single switch without having to worry about certificates perhaps at least the encryption part could become default.

Obviously you wouldn't get endpoint authentication without taking the extra step of setting up certificates, but then at least there would be truly no reason to go without encryption.

share|improve this answer
    
Boy I couldn't agree more. Screw the chain-of-trust racket...just give me the encryption!! –  HDave Sep 22 '10 at 5:57
    
The encryption is a useless security blanket without authentication. All it tells you is that you are communicating securely with someone; without also knowing who you're talking to, you could just be communicating perfectly securely with the eavesdropper. –  caf Sep 22 '10 at 6:00
    
On a LAN, you can install your owned self-signed CA on the company's machines and get the benefits of SSL without the cost of a real certificates. –  HDave Mar 21 at 14:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.