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- This is my find() method using Binary Search algorithm:

  • It works just as you would expect it to. No problems at all.

    public int find(long searchKey) {
    int lowerBound = 0;
    int upperBound = nElems - 1;
    int currentIndex;
    
    
    while(true) {
        currentIndex = (lowerBound + upperBound) / 2;
        if(a[currentIndex] == searchKey)
            return currentIndex; // found it!
        else if(lowerBound > upperBound)
            return nElems; // can't find it
        else { // so then divide range
            if(a[currentIndex] < searchKey)
                lowerBound = currentIndex + 1; // it's in upper half
            else
                upperBound = currentIndex - 1; // it's in lower half
        } // end else divide range
    } // end while loop
    } // end find() method
    

Here's the original insert() method using linear search. Pretty straightforward, right?

public void insert(long value) { // put element into array
    int j;
    for(j=0; j<nElems; j++) // find where it goes
        if(a[j] > value) // (linear search)
            break;
    for(int k=nElems; k>j; k--) // move bigger ones up
        a[k] = a[k-1];
    a[j] = value; // insert it
    nElems++; // increment size
} // end insert()

I need to modify the insert() method to use the binary search algorithm of the find() method. Here's what I came up with so far. Obviously there's something wrong with it, but I can't seem to find the problem. It doesn't work at all, i.e. no insertions are performed:

public int insertBS(long value) {
    int lowerBound = 0;
    int upperBound = nElems - 1;
    int curIn;

    while(true) {
        curIn = (lowerBound + upperBound) / 2;
        if(a[curIn] == value)
            return curIn;
        else if(lowerBound > upperBound)
            return nElems;
        else {
            if(a[curIn] < value)
                lowerBound = curIn + 1;
            else
                upperBound = curIn - 1;
        }

        for(int k=nElems; k>curIn; k--) // move bigger one up
            a[k] = a[k-1];
        a[curIn] = value; 
        nElems++; 
    }
}

Language: Java

Using ordered array.

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2  
IMO, using a binary search to find the insert point is a bad idea. The overall find-and-insert is O(n) anyway. Use a linear search-and-insert. But don't search up from index 0. Search down from the last item (while shifting each item up by one as you go) instead. When you reach the insert point, you've already made the gap to insert into. Compared with your existing linear approach, you will have touched (on average) half the number of items to get the same effect, and the code is simpler (only one loop). –  Steve314 Sep 22 '10 at 4:41
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Um, why not just CALL your find function?

public int insertBS(long value) {
    int curIn = find(value); // find where it goes (binary search)
    for(int k=nElems; k>curIn; k--) // move bigger one up
        a[k] = a[k-1];
    a[j] = value; // insert it
    nElems++; // increment size

}

This way, when you optimize/change your find function, your insert function will go faster, too!

As a side note, I think your find function will not give you expected behavior, as written. If you have a list of [0,1,4,5,9] and I search for 7, I will get an index of nElems (5), which could be misinterpreted as the values at indexes 0 to 4 are all less than 7. Seems a little wonky.

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well, it's obvious why the value isn't inserted, it's because you never inserted the value. Once you found the index of the position to insert you simply return from the function without doing anything.

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You need to perform the binary search to find the insertion index before moving elements. In your last code snippet, you are attempting to use the variable curIn to move elements inside your while loop before your binary search has finished. Try moving the for loop outside of the while loop.

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Lie Ryan is also correct. You need to break out of your while loop instead of returning so that you can finish with the insertion. –  Michael Petito Sep 22 '10 at 4:21
    
Yep, move everything from the last for() down to the closing bracket after that closing bracket. –  Justin Peel Sep 22 '10 at 4:22
    
Doing so causes "UNREACHABLE CODE" error. 1 fix available - remove. To make matters worse Eclipse doesn't even show which variable is out of scope. I've doubled checked and it seems to me that all variables are within the scope of the method. –  Twilight Pony Inc. Sep 22 '10 at 4:38
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int lowerBound = 0;
int upperBound = nElems-1;


int pos = 0;

if(value < a[0])
 pos=0;
else if(nElems>0 && value>a[upperBound])
 pos=nElems;
else
{
 while(nElems>1)
 {
  int j = (lowerBound + upperBound ) / 2;

  if(upperBound - lowerBound ==0)
  {
   pos = lowerBound+1;
   break;              // found it
      }
  else if(upperBound - lowerBound ==1)
  {
   pos=upperBound;  //lo encontre
   break;
  }
  else                          // divide range
          {
           if(a[j] < value)
               lowerBound = j + 1; // it's in upper half
       else
           upperBound = j - 1; // it's in lower half
      }  // end else divide range
 }
}


 for(int k=nElems; k>pos; k--)    // move higher ones up
    a[k] = a[k-1];
 a[pos] = value;                  // insert it
     nElems++;                      // increment size
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1  
Any chance you can explain this code and why it amounts to an answer to the question asked? –  Andrew Barber Oct 3 '12 at 18:15
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