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I am having a table structure like this:

Table : emp_details

id name value

1 phone 123-456-8765
1 address Toronto
1 age 25
1 sex male
1 firstname victor

Table:emp

id

1
2
3
4
.
.
.

I want the name value pair to be presented in a flat way: I am doing it in this naive implementation:
select emp.id as id,emp1.value as phone,emp2.value as address,emp3.value as age,emp4.value as sex,emp5.value as firstname
from emp,
(select id, value from emp_details where name = 'phone') emp1 where emp1.id = emp.id,
(select id, value from emp_details where name = 'address') emp2 where emp2.id = emp.id,
(select id, value from emp_details where name = 'age') emp3 where emp3.id = emp.id,
(select id, value from emp_details where name = 'sex') emp4 where emp4.id = emp.id,
(select id, value from emp_details where name = 'firstname') emp5 where emp5.id = emp.id

and emp.id = 1

Could you please suggest a better way to do this?

Thank you very much!

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1  
Could you enumerate the end result you are expecting? –  Sagar V Sep 22 '10 at 5:23
    
Some databases have better tools than others to accomplish this. Which one do you use? –  eumiro Sep 22 '10 at 5:25
    
This type of table organisation is known as Entity Attribute Value (or EAV). It is usually a very bad idea - see simple-talk.com/opinion/opinion-pieces/bad-carma for an example. –  Mark Bannister Sep 22 '10 at 15:54
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe you are looking for table rotation

    SELECT CASE [d.name]
             WHEN 'phone' THEN [d.value]
             ELSE ''
           END AS phone,
           CASE [d.name]
             WHEN 'address' THEN [d.value]
             ELSE ''
           END AS address,
           CASE [d.name]
             WHEN 'age' THEN [d.value]
             ELSE ''
           END AS age,
           CASE [d.name]
             WHEN 'sex' THEN [d.value]
             ELSE ''
           END AS sex,
           CASE [d.name]
             WHEN 'firstname' THEN [d.value]
             ELSE ''
           END AS firstname
    FROM   emp_details d
           INNER JOIN emp e
             ON d.id = e.id
    WHERE  e.id = 1 

And here is anothere way

SELECT phone = Isnull((SELECT [value]
                       FROM   emp_details
                       WHERE  [name] = 'phone'
                              AND [id] = d.[id]),''),
       address = Isnull((SELECT [value]
                         FROM   emp_details
                         WHERE  [name] = 'address'
                                AND [id] = d.[id]),''),
       age = Isnull((SELECT [value]
                     FROM   emp_details
                     WHERE  [name] = 'age'
                            AND [id] = d.[id]),''),
       sex = Isnull((SELECT [value]
                     FROM   emp_details
                     WHERE  [name] = 'sex'
                            AND [id] = d.[id]),''),
       firstname = Isnull((SELECT [value]
                           FROM   emp_details
                           WHERE  [name] = 'firstname'
                                  AND [id] = d.[id]),'')
FROM   emp_details d
       INNER JOIN emp e
         ON d.id = e.id
WHERE  e.id = 1 
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At present, the first query will return 5 rows - 1 row for every row in emp_details. You can change this to 1 row by putting MAX(...) around each CASE...END construct. –  Mark Bannister Sep 22 '10 at 15:51
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The first table would be much easier to use if it were set up differently.

Your table for emp_details could be arranged like this:

ID   phone         address     age     sex   firstname
1    123-123-1234  1 fake st.  12      M     Bob
2    222-222-2222  2 real st.  33      F     Alice

Then when you select a row, you'd get all the data you want:

SELECT * FROM emp_details WHERE ID = 1

This would give you a record with ID, phone, address, age, sex, and firstname of employee with ID 1 (Bob in this example).

The way your table is currently set up will only mean a huge amount of trouble for you in the future. You should fix it now if you still can.

Look into database normalization on Google.

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I believe this should work for you assuming you know in advance the names of the properties you are interested in. This example will allow nulls and will return rows where a property is missing which would still allow you to return the other fields for the given id.

DECLARE @emp_details TABLE (
    id int,
    name varchar(50),
    value varchar(50),
    PRIMARY KEY (id, name)
)

DECLARE @emp TABLE (
    id int PRIMARY KEY
)

INSERT INTO @emp_details (
    id,
    name,
    value
)
VALUES
    (1, 'phone', '123-456-8765'),
    (1, 'address', 'Toronto'),
    (1, 'age', '25'),
    (1, 'sex', 'male'),
    (1, 'firstname', 'victor')

INSERT INTO @emp (
    id
)
VALUES
    (1),
    (2),
    (3),
    (4)

SELECT
    emp.id AS id,
    empphone.value AS phone,
    empaddress.value AS address,
    empage.value AS age,
    empsex.value AS sex,
    empfirstname.value AS firstname
FROM
    @emp emp
    LEFT JOIN @emp_details empphone
        ON emp.id = empphone.id
            AND empphone.name = 'phone'
    LEFT JOIN @emp_details empaddress
        ON emp.id = empaddress.id
            AND empaddress.name = 'address'
    LEFT JOIN @emp_details empage
        ON emp.id = empage.id
            AND empage.name = 'age'
    LEFT JOIN @emp_details empsex
        ON emp.id = empsex.id
            AND empsex.name = 'sex'
    LEFT JOIN @emp_details empfirstname
        ON emp.id = empfirstname.id
            AND empfirstname.name = 'firstname'
WHERE
    emp.id = 1
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