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How do I calculate Day, Month, Year exactly?

Means..

From 2th Jan 1990 to 9th May 2009 is..

xxx Days, xxx Months, xxx Years.

Any idea how to do that?

I tried Timespan and Tick().. Both failed to do so..

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What do you want to get for: (2008,2,29)->(2009,2,28) and (2008,2,28)->(2009,2,28). I think TimeSpan doesn't support years and months because there are ambiguities and the calculation depends on the definition of date difference. –  default locale Sep 22 '10 at 7:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot do it through direct calculation (i.e. there's no "TotalMonths" or "TotalYears" property of TimeSpan, simply because those numbers do not make sense with arbitrary intervals of time).

Instead, you can just count the number in a loop, like so:

var dt1 = new DateTime(1990, 1, 2);
var dt2 = new DateTime(2009, 5, 9);

int years = 0;
while (dt1.AddYears(1) < dt2)
{
    years ++;
    dt1 = dt1.AddYears(1);
}

int months = 0;
while (dt1.AddMonths(1) < dt2)
{
    months ++;
    dt1 = dt1.AddMonths(1);
}

int days = (int) Math.Floor(dt2.Subtract(dt1).TotalDays);

I haven't tested this, so there might be off-by-one errors or whatever, but that's the basic idea.

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1  
I believe there's a fundamental problem with this "keep adding one" approach - see my answer for details. –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '10 at 6:38
    
@Jon: yes, I think you're right... –  Dean Harding Sep 22 '10 at 6:40
    
IT is working.. –  william Sep 22 '10 at 7:03
    
I still think my solution is better and runs in O(1) unless I'm overlooking something. –  Mark Sep 22 '10 at 7:30
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How about something like this?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace DateTimeTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var dt1 = new DateTime(1990, 1, 2);
            var dt2 = new DateTime(2009, 5, 9);

            int days = dt2.Day - dt1.Day;
            int months = dt2.Month - dt1.Month;
            int years = dt2.Year - dt1.Year;

            if (months < 0)
            {
                months += 12;
                years -= 1;
            }
            if (days < 0)
            {
                dt1.AddYears(years);
                dt1.AddMonths(months);
                days = dt2.Subtract(dt1).Days;
                months -= 1;
            }

            Console.WriteLine("{0} Days, {1} Months, {2} Years", days, months, years);
        }
    }
}

Outputs

7 Days, 4 Months, 19 Years

Is that the output you were looking for? You might need a couple extra conditions depending on how you want to define a "month".

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I don't think there's anything built into the framework to do this. TimeSpan won't do it because the number of days etc depends on the exact starting and ending point, not just the duration of time between them.

Here's a simple way of doing it, but inefficient:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        ShowDifference(new DateTime(1990, 1, 2),
                       new DateTime(2009, 5, 9));
    }

    static void ShowDifference(DateTime start,
                               DateTime end)
    {
        if (start > end)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException();
        }
        // See comment at the end
        int years = end.Year - start.Year - 2;
        while (start.AddYears(years) <= end)
        {
            years++;
        }
        years--;
        Console.WriteLine("{0} years", years);
        start = start.AddYears(years);
        int months = 0;
        while (start.AddMonths(months) <= end)
        {
            months++;
        }
        months--;
        Console.WriteLine("{0} months", months);
        start = start.AddMonths(months);
        int days = 0;
        while (start.AddDays(days) <= end)
        {
            days++;
        }
        days--;
        Console.WriteLine("{0} days", days);
    }
}

Obviously there are ways of making this more efficient, but they will be fiddly. EDIT: I've changed this to start off with a very conservative guess at the number of years - it may well be one lower than it needs to be, but I don't want to think about corner cases at the moment. It should definitely work, and the loops all have (fairly small) upper bounds for the number of times they'll run.

Note that at each step, you should add the complete number of years/days/months to the starting point, rather than doing it one month at a time. Otherwise, if you go from January 30th to March 30th, it will claim 2 months and 2 days because of the transition from January 30th to February 28th when you add a month, then February 28th to March 28th when you add a second month.

Hopefully Noda Time will make all this easier when I eventually get round to finishing it :)

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Nice solution. But I think it will be really fiddly to calculate the month and day difference. It's just one case to consider in order to calculate year difference in O(1) and hence the method itself will run in constant time. –  default locale Sep 22 '10 at 6:52
    
@Makkam: Yes, it's certainly doable. It's just fiddlier than I care to try to get right at this moment... –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '10 at 7:00
    
@Makkam: I've edited the code with a conservative compromise solution - I suspect it could still be more efficient, but I'm still sure it will work, and it's simple :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '10 at 7:03
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