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Is super() used to call the parent constructor? Please explain super().

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Yes it does call the parent's constructor - what are you trying to implement? –  Mark Sep 22 '10 at 8:08

10 Answers 10

up vote 47 down vote accepted

super() calls the parent constructor with no arguments.

It can be used also with arguments. I.e. super(argument1) and it will call the constructor that accepts 1 parameter of the type of argument1 (if exists).

Also it can be used to call methods from the parent. I.e. super.aMethod()

More info and tutorial here

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NOTE: in first case, parent class must have a no argument constructor failing to which will throw compilation error. –  KNU Aug 6 at 10:01

1.Super keyword is used to call immediate parent.

2.Super keyword can be used with instance members i.e., instance variables and instance methods.

3.Super keyword can be used within constructor to call the constructor of parent class.

OK now let’s practically implement this points of super keyword.

Check out the difference between program 1 and 2. Here program 2 proofs our first statement of Super keyword in Java.

Program 1

class Base
{
    int a = 100;
}

class Sup1 extends Base
{
    int a = 200;
    void show()
    {
        System.out.println(a);
        System.out.println(a);
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new Sup1().Show();
    }
}

Output : -

200

200

Now check out the program 2 and try to figure out the main difference.

Program 2

class Base
{
    int a = 100;
}

class Sup2 extends Base
{
    int a = 200;
    void Show()
    {
        System.out.println(super.a);
        System.out.println(a);
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new Sup2().Show();
    }
}

Output

100

200

In the program 1, the output was only of the derived class. It couldn’t print the variable of base class or parent class. But in the program 2, we used a super keyword with the variable a while printing its output and instead of printing the value of variable a of derived, it printed the value of variable a of base class. So it proofs that Super keyword is used to call immediate parent.

OK now check out the difference between program 3 and program 4

Program 3

class Base
{
    int a = 100;
    void Show()
    {
        System.out.println(a);
    }
}

class Sup3 extends Base
{
    int a = 200;
    void Show()
    {
        System.out.println(a);
    }
    public static void Main(String[] args)
    {
        new Sup3().Show();
    }
}

Output

200

Here the output is 200. When we called the show function, the show function of derived class was called. But what should we do if we want to call the show function of the parent class. Check out the program 4 for solution.

Program 4

class Base
{
    int a = 100;
    void Show()
    {
        System.out.println(a);
    }
}

class Sup4 extends Base
{
    int a = 200;
    void Show()
    {
        super.Show();
        System.out.println(a);
    }
    public static void Main(String[] args)
    {
        new Sup4().Show();
    }
}

Output

100

200

Here we are getting two output 100 and 200. When the show function of derived class is invoke, it first calls the show function of parent class because inside the show function of derived class we called the show function of parent class by putting the super keyword before the function name.

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1  
Why didn't you indent your sourcecode examples? Is there a specific reason? –  erikb85 Sep 22 '10 at 8:23
    
NO erikb,I want to know the usage of super().Hereafter only i going to –  Mohan Sep 22 '10 at 9:32
    
use it.Thanks a lot to all. –  Mohan Sep 22 '10 at 9:33
    
In my base class i overload the constructor with one,two,... arguments –  Mohan Sep 22 '10 at 9:35
    
but in my derived class i use super() without any argu. then what will happen whether it's automatically calls a default constructor of a base class –  Mohan Sep 22 '10 at 9:36

Is super() is used to call the parent constructor?

Yes.

Pls explain about Super().

super() is a special use of the super keyword where you call a parameterless parent constructor. In general, the super keyword can be used to call overridden methods, access hidden fields or invoke a superclass's constructor.

Here's the official tutorial

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2  
super() is used to call the parent constructor, super.myMethod() is used to call an overridden method. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 22 '10 at 8:12
2  
@seanizer or any other method of the superclass (including statics) if its in scope. super is just a reference to your base class. –  atamanroman Sep 22 '10 at 8:22
2  
I don't think super() is used to call base class methods. You can use super.method() though. –  Dheeraj Joshi Sep 22 '10 at 8:34
    
@seanizer, @Dheeraj: Thanks for your feedback, I've adapted my answer. –  Heinzi Sep 22 '10 at 8:40

Yes. super(...) will invoke the constructor of the super-class.

Have a look at this example:

class Animal {
    public Animal(String s) {
        System.out.println("Constructing an animal. s: " + s);
    }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
    public Dog() {
        super("super-argument!");
        System.out.println("Constructing a dog.");
    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] a) {
        new Dog();
    }
}

Prints:

Constructing an animal. s: super-argument!
Constructing a dog.
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In my base class i overload the constructor with one,two,...arguments in my derived class i use super() without any argu. then what will happen whether it's automatically calls a default constructor of a base class –  Mohan Sep 22 '10 at 9:39
    
Yes. If you call super() it will invoke the constructor of the super-class that takes no arguments. Similarly, it will invoke the 1-argument constructor if you do super(arg1), and so on. –  aioobe Sep 22 '10 at 9:41
    
if there was no constructor without any argu in base class then what happens if derived class calls super(). –  Mohan Sep 22 '10 at 12:08
    
Nothing. It will not compile. If you provide a constructor yourself, the automatic/default/no-argument-constructor will not be generated, thus super() will not be a valid call. –  aioobe Sep 22 '10 at 12:19

Yes, super() (lowercase) calls a constructor of the parent class. You can include arguments: super(foo, bar)

There is also a super keyword, that you can use in methods to invoke a method of the superclass

A quick google for "Java super" results in this

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That is correct. Super is used to call the parent constructor. So suppose you have a code block like so

class A{
    int n;
    public A(int x){
        n = x;
    }
}

class B extends A{
    int m;
    public B(int x, int y){
        super(x);
        m = y;
    }
}

Then you can assign a value to the member variable n.

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If your method overrides one of its superclass's methods, you can invoke the overridden method through the use of the keyword super. You can also use super to refer to a hidden field (although hiding fields is discouraged). Consider this class, Superclass:

public class Superclass {

public void printMethod() {
    System.out.println("Printed in Superclass.");
}

} Here is a subclass, called Subclass, that overrides printMethod():

public class Subclass extends Superclass {

// overrides printMethod in Superclass
public void printMethod() {
    super.printMethod();
    System.out.println("Printed in Subclass");
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Subclass s = new Subclass();
    s.printMethod();    
}

} Within Subclass, the simple name printMethod() refers to the one declared in Subclass, which overrides the one in Superclass. So, to refer to printMethod() inherited from Superclass, Subclass must use a qualified name, using super as shown. Compiling and executing Subclass prints the following:

Printed in Superclass. Printed in Subclass Subclass Constructors

The following example illustrates how to use the super keyword to invoke a superclass's constructor. Recall from the Bicycle example that MountainBike is a subclass of Bicycle. Here is the MountainBike (subclass) constructor that calls the superclass constructor and then adds initialization code of its own:

public MountainBike(int startHeight, int startCadence, int startSpeed, int startGear) { super(startCadence, startSpeed, startGear); seatHeight = startHeight; }
Invocation of a superclass constructor must be the first line in the subclass constructor.

The syntax for calling a superclass constructor is

super();
or: super(parameter list); With super(), the superclass no-argument constructor is called. With super(parameter list), the superclass constructor with a matching parameter list is called.

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Constructors
In a constructor, you can use it without a dot to call another constructor. super calls a constructor in the superclass; this calls a constructor in this class :

public MyClass(int a) {
  this(a, 5);  // Here, I call another one of this class's constructors.
}

public MyClass(int a, int b) {
  super(a, b);  // Then, I call one of the superclass's constructors.
}

super is useful if the superclass needs to initialize itself. this is useful to allow you to write all the hard initialization code only once in one of the constructors and to call it from all the other, much easier-to-write constructors.

Methods
In any method, you can use it with a dot to call another method. super.method() calls a method in the superclass; this.method() calls a method in this class :

public String toString() {
  int    hp   = this.hitpoints();  // Calls the hitpoints method in this class
                                   //   for this object.
  String name = super.name();      // Calls the name method in the superclass
                                   //   for this object.

  return "[" + name + ": " + hp + " HP]";
}

super is useful in a certain scenario: if your class has the same method as your superclass, Java will assume you want the one in your class; super allows you to ask for the superclass's method instead. this is useful only as a way to make your code more readable.

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every constructor has first statement as either call to super() or this(),by default call to super()

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