Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I made a program in Visual Studio 2010 on Windows 7 64-bit. When I try to run it on Windows XP 32-bit I got message that msvcr100.dll is missing. When I try to copy that file from Win7 to WInXP I got message that msvcr100.dll is wrong. How to set building in VS so msvcr100.dll would not be necessary?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

First you need to make sure you're building a 32 bit executable - 64 bit ones won't run on 32 bit Windows.

Then you can either...

  • Ship the 32 bit redistributables with your application.
  • Remove the runtime dependency altogether and link statically to the C++ runtimes. To do this, set Project -> Properties -> Configuration Properties -> C/C++ -> Code Generation -> Runtime Library to Multi-threaded (/MT).
share|improve this answer
    
Thanx, that helped :) –  Ichibann Oct 27 '10 at 15:07

Linking the runtime libraries statically should help. Go to Project Options -> C/C++ -> Code Generation -> Runtime Library and change the value to Multithreaded or Multithreaded Debug and recompile. This way your application shouldn't depend on the runtime DLLs.

Also don't forget to build a 32bit executable.

share|improve this answer

The answers above helped me along, but I was still getting the error:

fatal error C1189: #error : Please use the /MD switch for _AFXDLL builds

So to help other who may have, like me, spent way too much time stumbling around in search of a clear solution, I'd like to add the bit of information that solved this issue for me. As it turns out, my project had the wrong "Use of MFC" setting to make use of the answer above.

To put it in clear terms:

Open up the project properties (alt-F7 or Project-menu -> [My Project] Properties) and go to Project -> Properties -> Configuration Properties

If General -> Use of MFC is set to Use MFC in a Static Library

you must set

C/C++ -> Code Generation -> Runtime Library

to either Multi-threaded Debug (/MTd) or Multi-threaded (/MT)

and if

General -> Use of MFC is set to Use MFC in a Shared DLL

you must set

C/C++ -> Code Generation -> Runtime Library

to either Multi-threaded DLL (/MD) or Multi-threaded Debug DLL

I got this answer from the Microsoft community answers website and all credit should go to David Wilkinson.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.