Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hallo!

I would like to specialise only one of two template types. E.g. template <typename A, typename B> class X should have a special implementation for a single function X<float, sometype>::someFunc().

Sample code:

main.h:

#include <iostream>

template <typename F, typename I>
class B
{
public:
    void someFunc()
    {
        std::cout << "normal" << std::endl;
    };

    void someFuncNotSpecial()
    {
        std::cout << "normal" << std::endl;
    };
};

template <typename I>
void B<float, I>::someFunc();

main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "main.h"

using namespace std;

template <typename I>
void B<float, I>::someFunc()
{
    cout << "special" << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    B<int, int> b1;
    b1.someFunc();
    b1.someFuncNotSpecial();

    B<float, int> b2;
    b2.someFunc();
    b2.someFuncNotSpecial();
}

Compilation fails for class B. Is it true, that this is not possible in C++ in this way? What would be the best workaround?

[edit]

template <float, typename I> void B<float, I>::someFunc(); leads to main.h:26: error: ‘float’ is not a valid type for a template constant parameter

template <typename I> void B<float, I>::someFunc(); leads to main.h:27: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘class B’

And I'm using gcc.

[edit]

I don't want to specialise the whole class, as there are other functions that don't have a specialisation.

share|improve this question
    
Is the class template A related to your question? –  Doug Sep 22 '10 at 11:51
    
I thought it would make the question easier to understand. I will remove it. –  tauran Sep 22 '10 at 11:53
    
This has been asked hundreds of times on stackoverflow :) I think some of us could set up a real template FAQ with such questions. People can check the faq to see whether their question is answered, instead of having to search for a dupe. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 23 '10 at 4:53
    
@Johannes : Why don't you write such articles(FAQs)? I think you are one of the best when it comes to templates in C++. :-) –  Prasoon Saurav Sep 24 '10 at 2:20
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You have to provide a partial specialization of the class template B:

template <typename I>
class B<float, I>
{
public:
    void someFunc();
};

template <typename I>
void B<float, I>::someFunc()
{
    ...
}

You can also just define someFunc inside the specialization.

However, if you only want to specialize a function, and not a class do e. g.

template <typename F, typename I>
void someFunc(F f, I i) { someFuncImpl::act(f, i); }

template <typename F, typename I>
struct someFuncImpl { static void act(F f, I i) { ... } };

// Partial specialization
template <typename I>
struct someFuncImpl<float, I> { static void act(float f, I i) { ... } };

But you can't specialize a function template without this trick.

share|improve this answer
1  
You couldn't know this. But in my use case there are lots of other functions that don't have a specialisation. With this approach I would have to double all these functions. –  tauran Sep 22 '10 at 12:02
1  
@tauran: You cannot provide partial specializations for function templates. Only for class templates, and you have to provide the definition again for the whole class. Live with it, or see updated answer. –  Alexandre C. Sep 22 '10 at 12:04
    
Could you please address one more thing in tauran's code? There is template <typename I> void B<float, I>::someFunc(); at the end of main.h. I think tauran wants to declare, that there is a specialization defined somewhere, in another compilation unit. Doesn't such thing require exported templates? If the specialization is meant, to be visible in all compilation units, main.h is included in, doesn't it have to be in the header? –  Maciej Hehl Sep 22 '10 at 12:23
    
@Maciej: Exported template don't exist (except in the standard). Everything which is not an explicit (full) specialization has to be declared in the header. –  Alexandre C. Sep 22 '10 at 12:49
    
@Maciej it's worse because his attempt tries to declare a member function of a class template partial specialization B<float, I>. Such a partial specialization does not exist, so that thing at the end of main.h is ill-formed. (Even if it would exist, it would be ill-formed because an out-of-class declaration of a function must be a definition). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 24 '10 at 14:12
show 1 more comment

Although you can totally specialize member functions of a class template, you cannot _partially specialize member functions. - Andrei Alexandrescu

Partial Class specialization is explained by the other posters.

You can, however, use overloading:

template <class T, class U> T fun(U obj); // primary template
template <class U> void Fun<void, U>(U obj); // illegal pertial
// specialization
template <class T> T fun (Window obj); // legal (overloading)

If you want to go deep into this, you can read about this issue in depth in "Modern C++ Design" by A. Alexandrescu.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for recalling template overloads. This is a tool I seldom think about using, but which does the job in some situations. –  Alexandre C. Sep 22 '10 at 12:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.