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How do I remove diacritics (accents) from a string in .NET?

I have the following string

áéíóú

which I need to convert it to

aeiou

How can I achieve it? (I don't need to compare, I need the new string to save)


Not a duplicate of How do I remove diacritics (accents) from a string in .NET?. The accepted answer there doesn't explain anything and that's why I've "reopened" it.

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marked as duplicate by Thomas Levesque, Hans Passant, dmckee, Henk Holterman, Greg Hewgill Sep 23 '10 at 8:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Damn, want to rescind my reopen - it's definitely a duplicate. @BrunoLM if you dont like the answer it's better to put a bounty on it that ask a dup –  Ruben Bartelink May 15 '13 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It depends on requirements. For most uses, then normalising to NFD and then filtering out all combining chars will do. For some cases, normalising to NFKD is more appropriate (if you also want to removed some further distinctions between characters).

Some other distinctions will not be caught by this, notably stroked Latin characters. There's also no clear non-locale-specific way for some (should ł be considered equivalent to l or w?) so you may need to customise beyond this.

There are also some cases where NFD and NFKD don't work quite as expected, to allow for consistency between Unicode versions.

Hence:

public static IEnumerable<char> RemoveDiacriticsEnum(string src, bool compatNorm, Func<char, char> customFolding)
{
    foreach(char c in src.Normalize(compatNorm ? NormalizationForm.FormKD : NormalizationForm.FormD))
    switch(CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c))
    {
      case UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark:
      case UnicodeCategory.SpacingCombiningMark:
      case UnicodeCategory.EnclosingMark:
        //do nothing
        break;
      default:
        yield return customFolding(c);
        break;
    }
}
public static IEnumerable<char> RemoveDiacriticsEnum(string src, bool compatNorm)
{
  return RemoveDiacritics(src, compatNorm, c => c);
}
public static string RemoveDiacritics(string src, bool compatNorm, Func<char, char> customFolding)
{
  StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
  foreach(char c in RemoveDiacriticsEnum(src, compatNorm, customFolding))
    sb.Append(c);
  return sb.ToString();
}
public static string RemoveDiacritics(string src, bool compatNorm)
{
  return RemoveDiacritics(src, compatNorm, c => c);
}

Here we've a default for the problem cases mentioned above, which just ignores them. We've also split building a string from generating the enumeration of characters so we need not be wasteful in cases where there's no need for string manipulation on the result (say we were going to write the chars to output next, or do some further char-by-char manipulation).

An example case for something where we wanted to also convert ł and Ł to l and L, but had no other specialised concerns could use:

private static char NormaliseLWithStroke(char c)
{
  switch(c)
  {
     case 'ł':
       return 'l';
     case 'Ł':
       return 'L';
     default:
       return c;
  }
}

Using this with the above methods will combine to remove the stroke in this case, along with the decomposable diacritics.

share|improve this answer
    
There are some syntax problems, could you fix them? Your answer works and is very enlightening. Thank you. –  BrunoLM Sep 22 '10 at 15:24
    
Right you are Bruno, a few bits wrong due to writing straight as a reply rather than copying from a code editor. Should be correct now. –  Jon Hanna Sep 22 '10 at 15:35
    
+1 It seems to work but I don't follow. Would you explain customFolding? –  Blam Sep 3 '12 at 18:54
    
@Blam It's to catch cases that the basic approach doesn't cater for. of the examples given, the c => c lambda just ignores the issue, while NormaliseLWithStroke removes the stroke from stroked L without dealing with any other cases. If you'll never use it, you could replace yield return customFolding(c); with just yield return c; and gain a performance boost. On the other hand, normalising back to NFC is probably a good idea in terms of how it'll deal with Korean Hangul. –  Jon Hanna Sep 3 '12 at 19:27
1  
Any chance of you moving this answer to the cited dup of the question? –  Ruben Bartelink May 15 '13 at 8:16
public string RemoveDiacritics(string input)
{
    string stFormD = input.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
    int len = stFormD.Length;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        System.Globalization.UnicodeCategory uc = System.Globalization.CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(stFormD[i]);
        if (uc != System.Globalization.UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)
        {
            sb.Append(stFormD[i]);
        }
    }
    return (sb.ToString().Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why allow SpacingCombiningMark and EnclosingMark? –  Jon Hanna Sep 22 '10 at 14:01
    
As anwered above by Karaszi, its only example of how it can be done. Bruno didnt specified exact requirements. –  cichy Sep 22 '10 at 15:25
    
@cichy string has no Normalize method !? –  onmyway133 Nov 7 '12 at 2:48
    
@entropy Yes it does. :| Link to the Mono docs on it. goo.gl/HnBcJK –  Dan Atkinson Aug 8 '13 at 18:20
    
Good solution, also works great with Arabic diacritics and other special characters. –  Tamim Salem Jun 24 at 14:46

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