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Is it valid to have a std::pair of references ? In particular, are there issues with the assignment operator ? According to this link, there seems to be no special treatment with operator=, so default assignement operator will not be able to be generated.

I'd like to have a pair<T&, U&> and be able to assign to it another pair (of values or references) and have the pointed-to objects modified.

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Why not use pointers? Certainly no problems (except possible memory leaks) with std::pair<A*,B*> –  rubenvb Sep 22 '10 at 13:36
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You can have boost::ref s as well. –  mkb Sep 22 '10 at 13:41
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"except possible memory leaks" would be a strong reason in my book. However, since in this case the pair doesn't seem to own the objects, this shouldn't be a problem. But syntactical inconveniences are a pretty good reason as well. –  sbi Sep 22 '10 at 13:41
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@Matt: boost::reference_wrapper is not assignable. –  Georg Fritzsche Sep 22 '10 at 13:44
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std::pair of references is valid in C++11 but not in C++03, (not sure if because a change of the semantics of the language or because the standard library has changed.) boost::tuple is a solution in C++03 but it sounds like and overkill at first glance. –  alfC Apr 18 '13 at 2:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

No, you cannot do this reliably in C++03, because the constructor of pair takes references to T, and creating a reference to a reference is not legal in C++03.

Notice that I said "reliably". Some common compilers still in use (for GCC, I tested GCC4.1, @Charles reported GCC4.4.4) do not allow forming a reference to a reference, but more recently do allow it as they implement reference collapsing (T& is T if T is a reference type). If your code uses such things, you cannot rely on it to work on other compilers until you try it and see.

It sounds like you want to use boost::tuple<>

int a, b;

// on the fly
boost::tie(a, b) = std::make_pair(1, 2);

// as variable
boost::tuple<int&, int&> t = boost::tie(a, b);
t.get<0>() = 1;
t.get<1>() = 2;
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Now when and where did the map come into this? –  sbi Sep 22 '10 at 18:21
    
@sbi thanks. I knew i had too little sleep -.- –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 22 '10 at 18:47
    
@Johannes: What, at 8:15pm?? Now, when I was a student... :) –  sbi Sep 22 '10 at 18:48
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@sbi The question was "Is it valid to have a std::pair of references ? I want ..." and I answered correctly "No you cannot do this reliably in C++03". –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 22 '10 at 19:08
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Hmmm, I've just tested gcc 4.4.4 (more recent that 4.1) and it correctly disallows forming a reference to a reference. –  Charles Bailey Sep 22 '10 at 19:21

I think it would be legal to have a std::pair housing references. std::map uses std::pair with a const type, after all, which can't be assigned to either.

I'd like to have a pair<T&, U&> and be able to assign to it another pair

Assignment won't work, since you cannot reset references. You can, however, copy-initialize such objects.

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@sbi - is reference to a reference ever legal? Wouldn't that be required if using the pair in many places in STL? –  Steve Townsend Sep 22 '10 at 13:42
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I don't want to reset references. I'd like the referenced objects to be assigned. –  Alexandre C. Sep 22 '10 at 13:48
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@Alexandre: There will be no compiler-generated assignment operator for classes with reference member. But you can always derive from std::pair and give the derived class its own operator=() which does what you want. –  sbi Sep 22 '10 at 13:51
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@Steve: In a template, if you have a type T that is instantiated with a reference type (say, int&) and you try to form a reference with it (so, you use T&), the references collapse (so T& -> int& not T& -> int&&). It's called reference collapsing. If I recall correctly (and I may be wrong here), that wasn't actually in C++98, but there was a very early defect against the standard and the resolution was to allow this (and most compilers should support it); it is certainly in C++0x, though the rules are a bit more complex due to the introduction of rvalue references. –  James McNellis Sep 22 '10 at 14:47
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@sbi: MSVC has had this behaviour for as long as I can remember, and it's definitely in C++0x. Won't speak for C++03 but I thought it was Standard behaviour. –  Puppy Sep 22 '10 at 20:04

You are right. You can create a pair of references, but you can't use operator = anymore.

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I was thinking along the same lines as you, I think. I wrote the following class to scratch this particular itch:

template <class T1, class T2> struct refpair{
    T1& first;
    T2& second;
    refpair(T1& x, T2& y) : first(x), second(y) {}
    template <class U, class V>
        refpair<T1,T2>& operator=(const std::pair<U,V> &p){
            first=p.first;
            second=p.second;
            return *this;
        }
};

It allows you to do horrible things like:

int main (){

    int k,v;
    refpair<int,int> p(k,v);

    std::map<int,int>m;
    m[20]=100;
    m[40]=1000;
    m[60]=3;

    BOOST_FOREACH(p,m){
        std::cout << "k, v = " << k << ", " << v << std::endl;      
    }
    return 0;
}

(remember the relevant includes).

The nastiness is of course that the references to k and v that I am assigning to are hidden inside p. It almost becomes pretty again if you do something like this:

template <class T1,class T2>
refpair<T1,T2> make_refpair (T1& x, T2& y){
    return ( refpair<T1,T2>(x,y) );
}

Which allows you to loop like this:

BOOST_FOREACH(make_refpair(k,v),m){
    std::cout << "k, v = " << k << ", " << v << std::endl;      
}

(All comments are welcome as I am in no way a c++ expert.)

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I dont quite understand the purpose of the extra template for the assignment operator. Is that for dealing with inheritance structures and casting from different types like doubles to ints? –  Zachary Kraus Sep 22 at 4:34

I don't know what is "wrong" with std::pair in C++03 but if I reimplement it naively, I don't have any problem with it, (using the same compiler gcc and clang).

double a = 1.;
double b = 2.;
my::pair<double, double> p1(5., 6.);
my::pair<double&, double&> p2(a, b);
p2 = p1; // a == 5.

So a workaround could be to (1) reimplement pair (in a different namespace), or (2) specialize for std::pair<T&, T&>, or (3) simply use C++11 (where std::pair for refs works out of the box)

(1) Here it is the naive implementation

namespace my{
template<class T1, class T2>
struct pair{
    typedef T1 first_type;
    typedef T2 second_type;
    T1 first;
    T2 second;
    pair(T1 const& t1, T2 const& t2) : first(t1), second(t2){}
    template<class U1, class U2> pair(pair<U1, U2> const& p) : first(p.first), second(p.second){}
    template<class U1, class U2> 
    pair& operator=(const pair<U1, U2>& p){
      first = p.first;
      second = p.second;
      return *this;
    }
};
template<class T1, class T2>
pair<T1, T2> make_pair(T1 t1, T2 t2){
    return pair<T1, T2>(t1, t2);
}
}

(2) And here it is an specialization of std::pair (some people may complain that I am messing around overloading/specializing with the std namespace, but I think it is ok if it is to extend the capabilities of the class)

namespace std{
    template<class T1, class T2>
    struct pair<T1&, T2&>{
        typedef T1& first_type;    /// @c first_type is the first bound type
        typedef T2& second_type;   /// @c second_type is the second bound type
        first_type first;
        second_type second;
        pair(T1& t1, T2& t2) : first(t1), second(t2){}
        template<class U1, class U2> pair(pair<U1, U2> const& p) : first(p.first), second(p.second){}
        template<class U1, class U2> 
        pair& operator=(const pair<U1, U2>& p){
          first = p.first;
          second = p.second;
          return *this;
        }
    };
}

Maybe I am missing something obvious, I can edit the answer if some obvious flaws, are pointed.

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In C++11 you can use std::pair<std::reference_wrapper<T>, std::reference_wrapper<U>> and the objects of that type will behave exactly as you want.

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Or std::tr1::reference_wrapper if you are stuck using an older compiler that happens to include TR1 support. –  Nemo Jan 6 at 21:30

I ended up solving a similar problem by just building a really simple structure. I didn't even worry about the assignment operator since the default one should work fine.

template<class U, class V>
struct pair
{
pair(U & first, V & second): first(first), second(second) {}
U & first;
V & second;
}
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