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I use event delegation in such way:

elWraper.onclick = (function(){
    //how to get here "event" object
    e = e || window.event;
    var t = e.target || e.srcElement;

    //event handler
    return function(){
        //manipulations with "t" variable
    }
})();

how to get "event" object within the immediately executed function?

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What's your goal? You're calling a function, using a variable e which is undefined (and as a result, the script execution will halt with an error) –  Lekensteyn Sep 22 '10 at 13:45
    
why are you doing this instead of addEventListener? –  lincolnk Sep 22 '10 at 13:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
elWraper.onclick = (function(){
    // misc stuff here    

    //event handler
    return function(e){
        e = e || window.event;
        var t = e.target || e.srcElement;
        //manipulations with "t" variable
    }
})();

In standards compliant browsers the event object is the first parameter passed into the callback function. In IE it is a global variable (which is what e = e || window.event is trying to determine). Therefore, the function that you return by the immediately executed function should accept the event object declared as its first (and usually only) argument.


Clarification

Since people are wondering (and probably they are wondering why the OP accepted this instead answer) there are uses for this that is not clear from the OP's question. One is to create a closure to a variable to track something:

/* Count number of clicks,
 * WITHOUT USING GLOBAL VARS!
 */
el.onclick = (function(){
    var counter = 0;
    return function(e){
      e = e || window.event;
      var t = e.target || e.srcElement;
      counter ++;
      alert('detected '+counter+' clicks!');
      // do stuff with t or e ...
    }
})();

also, this is the classic way of assigning event handlers in loops:

/* Use double closure to break closure in loop!
 */
for (var i=0; i<stuff.length; i++) {
    var el = stuff[i];
    el.onclick = (function(x){
        return function(e){
          e = e || window.event;
          var t = e.target || e.srcElement;
          alert(x);
          // do stuff with t or e ...
        }
    })(i);
}

Or maybe the OP just thought that he could 'cache' the event object and mistakenly believed he could use this to do it. In which case, reading my explanation (instead of just the code) should enlighten the reader as to why that would be a bad idea.

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I don't get it. Why not just elWraper.onclick = function(e){...}? –  Dagg Nabbit Sep 25 '10 at 3:04
    
Neither do I (from the example code). But that is the question the OP is asking so that is the question I'm answering. Maybe he's doing something in the bit that says //misc stuff here like creating a closure to some variables to have them behave like static variables or something. There are uses for this (this is basically how you assign event handlers in a loop) but it is not clear just from reading the OP's original code. –  slebetman Sep 25 '10 at 4:40
    
I this example, the handler doesn't use the i variable, but if it did, it would be the same across all handlers (the value of i after the loop finishes). This would be the only way to have a separate i for each of the handlers. –  Juan Mendes Dec 8 '10 at 21:42
elWraper.onclick = function (e) {
  //how to get here "event" object
  e = e || window.event;
  var t = e.target || e.srcElement;
  //manipulations with "t" variable
};
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That's not an 'immediately executed' function, though. It lacks the () operator at the end of the function definition. –  JAL Sep 22 '10 at 13:45
1  
@Alex JL: Yeah, but what's the point of having an 'immediately executed' function here in the first place? It's just extraneous AFAICT. –  Dagg Nabbit Sep 22 '10 at 13:57

I think slebetman's answer is correct according to your question. However, I don't see the point of what you are doing. If you are trying to abstract the browser's event differences, you can use something like this.

function createHandler( context, handler ) {
  return function (e) {    
    e = e || window.event;
    var t = e.target || e.srcElement;
    handler.call (context || window, e, t);
  }
}

Then you can use it like

div.onclick = createHandler(div, function(e, t){
   alert ("actual clicked target is " +  t.id);
   alert ("handler was set on node " + this.id);
});

Note that you can pass anything as the context (the 'this' keyword in the handler)

It's good to know this stuff, but jquery or many other libs already do this for you and it's a lot more tested than your code will ever be and it takes care of many more browser differences than this small function. But if this all you need, this does keep code bloat down.

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