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I am parsing a log file and trying to match error statements. The part of the line I am matching "error CS" will apply to numerous lines some duplicates some not. Is there a way I can not return the duplicates. Using Java flavor of RegEx..

example: my simple regex returns

Class1.cs(16,27): error CS0117: 'string' does not contain a definition for 'empty'
Class1.cs(34,20): error CS0103: The name 'thiswworked' does not exist in the current context
Class1.cs(16,27): error CS0117: 'string' does not contain a definition for 'empty'
Class1.cs(34,20): error CS0103: The name 'thiswworked' does not exist in the current context

would like it to return:

Class1.cs(16,27): error CS0117: 'string' does not contain a definition for 'empty'
Class1.cs(34,20): error CS0103: The name 'thiswworked' does not exist in the current context
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What language are you using, Java or C#? –  NullUserException Sep 22 '10 at 16:08
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/1863957/… –  kennytm Sep 22 '10 at 16:11
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Depending on the structure of your error log file, you might be able to discard duplicates in the regex. But I would recommend doing so after you have the matches, something like what KennyTM suggested in his link above –  NullUserException Sep 22 '10 at 16:14
    
Thanks for the responses. The Regex I am using is java.util.regex.pattern. As an aside, i am doing this inside of the Hudson notify e-mail-ext plugin, not inside of any program. It parses the build log file, and allows you to use that data in the e-mail. –  Bernie Sep 22 '10 at 19:00
    
So, i really need to no if this is possible via a regular expression..Sorry for confusion. –  Bernie Sep 22 '10 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

One solution is to match using your regexp and then put the line into a data structure like a set which deals with removing duplicates for you. At the end of parsing just print the contents of the set.

If you're concerned about order you could add to a map of some kind with the line as the key and the line number as the value (perhaps checking for a matching entry before inserting). If you sort by value you'll get a list of the first instance of a given line.

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Regex to identify, data structure to filter. Different tools serve different tasks. If you were shell scripting, pipe this to | sort | uniq, for example (which would use more memory than something you could program, but that's another story) –  Jeff Ferland Nov 2 '10 at 16:24

Technically speaking, with a regular expression, this is not possible. You need something more powerful.

Regular expressions are meant for matching regular languages. The pattern you are attempting to match is not regular.

You require the expression to remember some 'state', the previously matched errors, and regular expressions are not meant to handle this type of computation. A Turing Machine is capable of saving state. This is more along the lines of what you need. (Java will fit the bill nicely.)

This could be fairly easily solved by adding some extra logic into your log parser after you find all of the error lines.

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