Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am editing a Perl file, but I don't understand this regexp comparison. Can someone please explain it to me?

if ($lines =~ m/(.*?):(.*?)$/g) { } .. 

What happens here? $lines is a line from a text file.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like first (.*?) will always match to empty string. –  Ivan Nevostruev Sep 22 '10 at 16:40
1  
Not always. It'll match all characters up to the first colon. –  CanSpice Sep 22 '10 at 16:43
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Break it up into parts:

$lines =~ m/ (.*?)      # Match any character (except newlines)
                        # zero or more times, not greedily, and
                        # stick the results in $1.
             :          # Match a colon.
             (.*?)      # Match any character (except newlines)
                        # zero or more times, not greedily, and
                        # stick the results in $2.
             $          # Match the end of the line.
           /gx;

So, this will match strings like ":" (it matches zero characters, then a colon, then zero characters before the end of the line, $1 and $2 are empty strings), or "abc:" ($1 = "abc", $2 is an empty string), or "abc:def:ghi" ($1 = "abc" and $2 = "def:ghi").

And if you pass in a line that doesn't match (it looks like this would be if the string does not contain a colon), then it won't process the code that's within the brackets. But if it does match, then the code within the brackets can use and process the special $1 and $2 variables (at least, until the next regular expression shows up, if there is one within the brackets).

share|improve this answer
add comment

There is a tool to help understand regexes: YAPE::Regex::Explain.

Ignoring the g modifier, which is not needed here:

use strict;
use warnings;
use YAPE::Regex::Explain;

my $re = qr/(.*?):(.*?)$/;
print YAPE::Regex::Explain->new($re)->explain();

__END__

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:(.*?):(.*?)$)

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \1:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    .*?                      any character except \n (0 or more times
                             (matching the least amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  :                        ':'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \2:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    .*?                      any character except \n (0 or more times
                             (matching the least amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \2
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------

See also perldoc perlre.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's damn neat! –  Robert P Sep 22 '10 at 18:37
add comment

It was written by someone who either knows too much about regular expressions or not enough about the $' and $` variables.

THis could have been written as

if ($lines =~ /:/) {
    ... # use $` ($PREMATCH)  instead of $1
    ... # use $' ($POSTMATCH) instead of $2
}

or

if ( ($var1,$var2) = split /:/, $lines, 2 and defined($var2) ) {
    ... # use $var1, $var2 instead of $1,$2
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you want to use /:/, use the /p flag and the ${^PREMATCH} and ${^POSTMATCH} variables from Perl 5.10. I'd prefer split, though, since that's what's actually happening. –  brian d foy Sep 22 '10 at 20:16
add comment

That line says to perform a regular expression match on $lines with the regex m/(.*?):(.*?)$/g. It will effectively return true if a match can be found in $lines and false if one cannot be found.

An explanation of the =~ operator:

Binary "=~" binds a scalar expression to a pattern match. Certain operations search or modify the string $_ by default. This operator makes that kind of operation work on some other string. The right argument is a search pattern, substitution, or transliteration. The left argument is what is supposed to be searched, substituted, or transliterated instead of the default $_. When used in scalar context, the return value generally indicates the success of the operation.

The regex itself is:

m/    #Perform a "match" operation
(.*?) #Match zero or more repetitions of any characters, but match as few as possible (ungreedy)
:     #Match a literal colon character
(.*?) #Match zero or more repetitions of any characters, but match as few as possible (ungreedy)
$     #Match the end of string
/g    #Perform the regex globally (find all occurrences in $line)

So if $lines matches against that regex, it will go into the conditional portion, otherwise it will be false and will skip it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

(.*?) captures any characters, but as few of them as possible.

So it looks for patterns like <something>:<somethingelse><end of line>, and if there are multiple : in the string, the first one will be used as the divider between <something> and <somethingelse>.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.