Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I generate a random boolean with a probability of p (where 0 <= p <= 1.0) using the C standard library rand() function?

i.e.

bool nextBool(double probability)
{
    return ...
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
bool nextBool(double probability)
{
    return (rand() / (double)RAND_MAX) < probability;
}

or (after seeing other responses)

bool nextBool(double probability)
{
    return rand() <  probability * ((double)RAND_MAX + 1.0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Perfect, thanks (top one). –  Jake Petroules Sep 22 '10 at 16:47
    
The second one might actually be faster. They're mathematically identical. –  Colin Sep 22 '10 at 18:29
3  
That needs to be probability * (RAND_MAX + 1) - otherwise, passing a value of 1.0 as probability will result in the function returning 0 sometimes. –  caf Sep 23 '10 at 0:49
    
@caf Good catch, thanks for pointing that out. –  Jake Petroules Sep 23 '10 at 14:42
    
Thank you very much. I fixed a minor issue in your second version, as the +1 generated an integer overflow –  leemes Nov 11 '12 at 10:35

Do you mean generate a random variable so that p(1) = p and p(0) = (1-p)?

If so, compare the output of rand() to p*RAND_MAX.

share|improve this answer

The following generator should not be biased, given rand() efficiently uniform and independent:

bool nextBool(double probability)
{
    double p_scaled = probability * (RAND_MAX+1) - rand();
    if ( p_scaled >= 1 ) return true;
    if ( p_scaled <= 0 ) return false;
    return random_bool( p_scaled );
}

Note, that while function is recursive,

  1. probability of the recursive call is 1.0/RAND_MAX, i.e quite small,
  2. it has to be recursive or in some other way call rand() multiple times, if you want to use probability different from multiples of 1.0/RAND_MAX.

Also note, that the probability is still a little bit biased. See this question.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.