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I've just started to get in to C programming and would appreciate criticism on my ReplaceString function. It seems pretty fast (it doesn't allocate any memory other than one malloc for the result string) but it seems awfully verbose and I know it could be done better.

Example usage:

printf("New string: %s\n", ReplaceString("great", "ok", "have a g grea great day and have a great day great"));
printf("New string: %s\n", ReplaceString("great", "fantastic", "have a g grea great day and have a great day great"));

Code:

#ifndef uint
    #define uint unsigned int
 #endif

char *ReplaceString(char *needle, char *replace, char *haystack)
{
    char *newString;
    uint lNeedle = strlen(needle);
    uint lReplace = strlen(replace);
    uint lHaystack = strlen(haystack);
    uint i;
    uint j = 0;
    uint k = 0;
    uint lNew;
    char active = 0;
    uint start = 0;
    uint end = 0;

    /* Calculate new string size */    
    lNew = lHaystack;

    for (i = 0; i < lHaystack; i++)
    {

        if ( (!active) && (haystack[i] == needle[0]))
        {
            /* Start of needle found */
            active = 1;
            start = i;
            end = i;
        }
        else if ( (active) && (i-start == lNeedle) )
        {
            /* End of needle */
            active = 0;
            lNew += lReplace - lNeedle;
        }
        else if ( (active) && (i-start < lNeedle) && (haystack[i] == needle[i-start]) )
        {
            /* Next part of needle found */
            end++;
        }
        else if (active)
        {
            /* Didn't match the entire needle... */
            active = 0;
        }

    }
    active= 0;
    end = 0;


    /* Prepare new string */
    newString = malloc(sizeof(char) * lNew + 1);
    newString[sizeof(char) * lNew] = 0;

    /* Build new string */
    for (i = 0; i < lHaystack; i++)
    {

        if ( (!active) && (haystack[i] == needle[0]))
        {
            /* Start of needle found */
            active = 1;
            start = i;
            end = i;
        }
        else if ( (active) && (i-start == lNeedle) )
        {
            /* End of needle - apply replacement */
            active = 0;

            for (k = 0; k < lReplace; k++)
            {
                newString[j] = replace[k];
                j++;
            }
            newString[j] = haystack[i];
            j++;

        }
        else if ( (active) && (i-start < lNeedle) && (haystack[i] == needle[i-start])
                )
        {
            /* Next part of needle found */
            end++;
        }
        else if (active)
        {
            /* Didn't match the entire needle, so apply skipped chars */
            active = 0;

            for (k = start; k < end+2; k++)
            {
                newString[j] = haystack[k];
                j++;
            }

        }
        else if (!active)
        {
            /* No needle matched */
            newString[j] = haystack[i];
            j++;
        }

    }

    /* If still matching a needle... */
    if ( active && (i-start == lNeedle))
    {
        /* If full needle */
        for (k = 0; k < lReplace; k++)
        {
            newString[j] = replace[k];
            j++;
        }
        newString[j] = haystack[i];
        j++;
    }
    else if (active)
    {
        for (k = start; k < end+2; k++)
        {
            newString[j] = haystack[k];
            j++;
        }
    }

    return newString;
}

Any ideas? Thanks very much!

share|improve this question
3  
Are you not allowed to use the functions from string.h? –  Carl Norum Sep 22 '10 at 17:28
    
@Carl, which in particular? (don't tell me there's a ReplaceString there somewhere!! ;) ) –  HoboBen Sep 22 '10 at 17:33
2  
I don't think there is, but there is strstr() that finds a sub-string. –  linuxuser27 Sep 22 '10 at 17:38
1  
Is this a generic string replace function, or are you planning for some specific uses? For instance, if you are going to reuse needle and haystack as some sort of template, you could do a "compilation" step. If needle is always quite long, you may want to look at Boyer-Moore algorythm, ... –  ninjalj Sep 22 '10 at 17:51
    
@ninjalj - that's a good consideration. In this case, I'm just replacing three-or-four-character strings on extremely variable input, but I'll bear this in mind. I love the Boyer-Moore algorithm; it's amazing how it gets faster as the needle gets longer - definitely something I'll try to implement as a learning experience. Thanks! –  HoboBen Sep 22 '10 at 18:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't call strlen(haystack). You are already checking every character in the string, so computing the string length is implicit to your loop, as follows:

for (i = 0; haystack[i] != '\0'; i++)
{
    ...
}
lHaystack = i;
share|improve this answer
    
Neat, thanks Brian! –  HoboBen Sep 22 '10 at 18:02

It's possible you are doing this in your own way for practice. If so, you get many points for effort.

If not, you can often save time by using functions that are in the C Runtime Library (CRT) versus coding your own equivalent function. For example, you could use strstr to locate the string that's targeted for replacement. Other string manipulation functions may also be useful to you.

A good exercise would be to complete this example to your satisfaction and then recode using the CRT to see how much faster it is to code and execute.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; I will definitely do that. I can think of several ways to implement the function and writing and timing them all sounds like a good idea. –  HoboBen Sep 22 '10 at 17:54
1  
For a new coder, this is nice-looking code. You could also consider using pointer arithmetic in walking the strings instead of indices eg. for (char* next = haystack, i = 0; i < lHaystack; ++next, ++i) and ` if ( (!active) && (*next == needle[0]))` –  Steve Townsend Sep 22 '10 at 18:02

While looping the first time, you should keep indices on where there need to be replacement and skip those on the strcopy/replace part of the function. This would result in a loop where you only do strncpy from haystack or replacement to new string.

share|improve this answer

Make the parameters const

char *ReplaceString(const char *needle, const char *replace, const char *haystack)

Oh ... is the function supposed to work only once per word?

ReplaceString("BAR", "bar", "BARBARA WENT TO THE BAR")

share|improve this answer

My one suggestion has nothing to do with improving performance, but with improving readability.

"Cute" parameter names are much harder to understand than descriptive ones. Which of the following parameters do you think better convey their purpose?

char *ReplaceString(char *needle, char *replace, char *haystack)
char *ReplaceString(char *oldText, char *newText, char *inString)

With one, you have to consciously map a name to a purpose. With the other, the purpose IS the name. Juggling a bunch of name mappings in your head while trying to understand a piece of code can become difficult, especially as the number of variables increases.

This might not seem so important when you're the only one using your code, but it's paramount when your code is being used or read by someone else. And sometimes, "someone else" is yourself, a year later, looking at your own code, wondering why you're searching through haystacks and trying to replace needles ;)

share|improve this answer
1  
In this case, I'd say that every C programmer should be used to needle and haystack, since those are the traditional names of strstr() parameters. –  ninjalj Sep 22 '10 at 18:16
    
Yup, what I'm used to from PHP and a few BASIC & Pascal dialects too, though I appreciate the concern –  HoboBen Sep 22 '10 at 18:25

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