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Why does it (apparently) make a difference whether I pass null as an argument directly, or pass an Object that I assigned the value null?

Object testVal = null;
test.foo(testVal);    // dispatched to foo(Object)
// test.foo(null);    // compilation problem -> "The method foo(String) is ambiguous"	

public void foo(String arg) { // More-specific
	System.out.println("foo(String)");
}

public void foo(Object arg) { // Generic
	System.out.println("foo(Object)");
}

In other words, why is the (commented-out) second call to foo(...) not dispatched to foo(Object)?

Update: I use Java 1.6. I could compile Hemal's code without problems, but mine still doesn't compile. The only difference I see is that Hemal's methods are static while mine are not. But I really don't see why this should make a difference...?

Update 2: Solved. I had another method foo(Runnable) in my class, so the dispatcher couldn't unambiguously select the single most specific method. (See my comment in Hemal's second answer.) Thanks everyone for your help.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Which version of Java are you using? With 1.6.0_11 the code (pasted below) compiles and runs.

I am sure its obvious why foo(testVal) goes to foo(Object).

The reason why foo(null) goes to foo(String) is a little complex. The constant null is of type nulltype, which is a subtype of all types. So, this nulltype extends String, which extends Object.

When you call foo(null) compiler looks for the overloaded method with most specific type. Since String is more specific then Object that is the method that gets called.

If you had another overload that was as specific as String, say foo(Integer) then you would get a ambiguous overload error.

class NullType {

  public static final void main(final String[] args) {
    foo();
  }

  static void foo()
  {
    Object testVal = null;
    foo(testVal);    // dispatched to foo(Object)
    foo(null);    // compilation problem -> "The method foo(String) is ambiguous"   
  }

  public static void foo(String arg) { // More-specific
    System.out.println("foo(String)");
  }

  public static void foo(Object arg) { // Generic
    System.out.println("foo(Object)");
  }

}
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Just tested this and I'm stunned that (a) 6u11 doesn't say it's ambiguous, and (b) that null resolves to String not Object. Learn something new every day - +1 for the lesson. –  Lawrence Dol Dec 18 '08 at 9:17
1  
@Software Monkey: Once you accept that the constant null is of null type and the null type is a subtype of all types, this is quite obvious. Object < String < nulltype. So String is preferable over Object. Glad this was useful. Thanks for the +1. –  Miserable Variable Dec 18 '08 at 10:16
    
Pedantry: the method is overriding Object with String. Overloading is where the method name is the same but the signature varies more widely. Excellent answer. Thx. –  sam Nov 30 '11 at 22:34

Because the second commented out invocation with null is ambiguous to the compiler. The literal null could be a string or an object. Whereas the assigned value has a definite type. You need to cast the null, e.g. test.foo((String)null) to remove the ambiguity.

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Has anyone tried the example ???

With 1.6.0 foo(null) is dispatched to the most specific method applicable which is foo(String)...

If you add a new method say foo(Integer) the compiler cannot choose the most specific applicable method and shows an error.

-Patrick

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Sorry to use an answer, for a comment, but I need to post code that won't fit in comment.

@Yang, I am also able to compile and run the following. Can you post a complete code that compiles with one line commented such that if I uncomment that line it won't compile?

class NullType {

  public static final void main(final String[] args) {
    foo();
    new Test().bar(new Test());
  }

  static void foo()
  {
    Object testVal = null;
    foo(testVal);    // dispatched to foo(Object)
    // foo(null);    // compilation problem -> "The method foo(String) is ambiguous"   
  }

  public static void foo(String arg) { // More-specific
    System.out.println("foo(String)");
  }

  public static void foo(Integer arg) { // More-specific
    System.out.println("foo(Integer)");
  }

  public static void foo(Object arg) { // Generic
    System.out.println("foo(Object)");
  }


}


class Test
{
  void bar(Test test)
  {
    Object testVal = null;
    test.foo(testVal);    // dispatched to foo(Object)
    test.foo(null);    // compilation problem -> "The method foo(String) is ambiguous"   
  }

  public void foo(String arg) { // More-specific
    System.out.println("foo(String)");
  }

  public void foo(Object arg) { // Generic
    System.out.println("foo(Object)");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, I cleaned up my test class to post it here and realized that besides foo(String) and foo(Object), I also had a foo(Runnable) - which I now understand caused foo(null) to be ambiguous because String is not more specific than Runnable, and vice versa. Thanks Hemal for your valuable help! –  Yang Meyer Dec 18 '08 at 12:18
    
Glad I was able to help. You are welcome. –  Miserable Variable Dec 19 '08 at 0:59

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