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2^15 = 32768 and the sum of its digits is 3 + 2 + 7 + 6 + 8 = 26.

What is the sum of the digits of the number 2 power of 1000 (2^1000)?

Can anyone provide the solution or algorithm for this problem in java?

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6  
Ah, not homework. projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=16 –  Cody Brocious Dec 18 '08 at 9:47
20  
If it's not homework, it's missing the entire point of Project Euler - why visit a math problem site if you're just going to ship the work off to other people? –  Gareth Dec 18 '08 at 9:48
1  
You haven't shown anything by which we can see that you have been trying this from last two days. –  Adeel Ansari Dec 18 '08 at 10:03
1  
@BlackPanther : Pretty amazing how you killed everything you said by using that last sentence in your comment. –  Learning Dec 18 '08 at 10:11
2  
Bleh. Posting code solutions for Project Euler questions just leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Not much better than just posting the answer to paste into the form. –  Beska Mar 10 '10 at 14:08
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closed as too localized by hirschhornsalz, Mark, Florent, RB., juergen d Oct 11 '12 at 10:51

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11 Answers

Here is my solution:

public static void main(String[] args) {

	ArrayList<Integer> n = myPow(2, 100);

	int result = 0;
	for (Integer i : n) {
		result += i;
	}

	System.out.println(result);
}

public static ArrayList<Integer> myPow(int n, int p) {
	ArrayList<Integer> nl = new ArrayList<Integer>();
	for (char c : Integer.toString(n).toCharArray()) {
		nl.add(c - 48);
	}

	for (int i = 1; i < p; i++) {
		nl = mySum(nl, nl);
	}

	return nl;
}

public static ArrayList<Integer> mySum(ArrayList<Integer> n1, ArrayList<Integer> n2) {
	ArrayList<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();

	int carry = 0;

	int max = Math.max(n1.size(), n2.size());
	if (n1.size() != max)
		n1 = normalizeList(n1, max);
	if (n2.size() != max)
		n2 = normalizeList(n2, max);

	for (int i = max - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
		int n = n1.get(i) + n2.get(i) + carry;
		carry = 0;
		if (n > 9) {
			String s = Integer.toString(n);
			carry = s.charAt(0) - 48;
			result.add(0, s.charAt(s.length() - 1) - 48);
		} else
			result.add(0, n);
	}

	if (carry != 0)
		result.add(0, carry);

	return result;
}

public static ArrayList<Integer> normalizeList(ArrayList<Integer> l, int max) {
	int newSize = max - l.size();
	for (int i = 0; i < newSize; i++) {
		l.add(0, 0);
	}
	return l;
}

This code can be improved in many ways ... it was just to prove you can perfectly do it without BigInts.

The catch is to transform each number to a list. That way you can do basic sums like:

123456
+   45
______
123501
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Is there any specific reason why you don't want to use BigInts? I'm thinking performance, but your version does not seem to be lightweight. –  Morten Christiansen Dec 18 '08 at 11:42
    
lol. The reason is that this is a algorithm problem and you are suppose to find an answer that solves this without BigInts. BigInts is cheating ... –  bruno conde Dec 18 '08 at 11:49
6  
As you say, it is an algorithm/math problem. The 2^32 or 2^64 limit is just an implementation limit imposed by the machine's processor. I'd argue that using BigInts just gets you back closer to ideal arithmetic. –  Boojum Dec 19 '08 at 0:35
1  
I'd have to agree with Boojum on this one. –  Morten Christiansen Dec 19 '08 at 9:48
3  
With BigInts this is a trivial problem. bruno is quite correct in that this isn't quite the point of the problem. –  cletus Mar 24 '09 at 23:50
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I won't provide code, but java.math.BigInteger should make this trivial.

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Create a vector of length 302, which is the length of 2^1000. Then, save 2 at index 0, then, double 1000 times. Just look at every index separetly and add 1 to the next index if the previous exeeds 10. Then just sum it up!

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2  
save 1 at index 0 - if you save 2, you will end up doubling by 1001 times. And 'exceeding' 10 is not completely correct - you have to carry the 1 over if the value exceeds 9 (e.g. is 10 or higher). –  Joscha Dec 18 '12 at 1:48
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This problem is not simply asking you how to find the nearest big integer library, so I'd avoid that solution. This page has a good overview of this particular problem.

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something like that sould do it bute force: - although there is a nice analytic solution (think pen& paper) using mathematics - that may also work for numbers greater than 1000.

    final String bignumber = BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(1000).toString(10);
	long result = 0;
	for (int i = 0; i < bignumber.length(); i++) {
		result += Integer.valueOf(String.valueOf(bignumber.charAt(i)));
	}
	System.out.println("result: " + result);
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How can 2^1000 be alternatively expressed?

I don't remember much from my maths days, but perhaps something like (2^(2^500))? And how can that be expressed?

Find an easy way to calculate 2^1000, put the result in a BigInteger, and the rest is perhaps trivial.

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Nitpicking, but 2^1000 != 2^(2^500) –  BlackWasp Jan 3 '09 at 14:27
2  
It's (2^500)^2 :-) –  Vijay Dev Mar 14 '09 at 12:51
1  
Yes but knowing the sum of digits of A=2^500 does not help you in knowing the sum of digits of A^2 = 2^1000 –  smci Sep 5 '11 at 21:25
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Here is my code... Please provide the necessary arguments to run this code.

import java.math.BigInteger;

public class Question1 {
    private static int SumOfDigits(BigInteger inputDigit) {
        int sum = 0;
        while(inputDigit.bitLength() > 0) {
            sum += inputDigit.remainder(new BigInteger("10")).intValue();
            inputDigit = inputDigit.divide(new BigInteger("10"));       
        }                       
        return sum;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BigInteger baseNumber = new BigInteger(args[0]);
        int powerNumber = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
        BigInteger powerResult = baseNumber.pow(powerNumber);
        System.out.println(baseNumber + "^" + powerNumber + " = " + powerResult);
        System.out.println("Sum of Digits = " + Question1.SumOfDigits(powerResult));
    }

}    
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int result = 0;

String val = BigInteger.valueOf(2).pow(1000).toString();

for(char a : val.toCharArray()){
    result = result + Character.getNumericValue(a);
}
System.out.println("val ==>" + result);

It's pretty simple if you know how to use the biginteger.

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2^1000 is a very large value, you would have to use BigIntegers. The algorithm would be something like:

import java.math.BigInteger;
BigInteger two = new BigInteger("2");
BigInteger value = two.pow(1000);
int sum = 0;
while (value > 0) {
  sum += value.remainder(new BigInteger("10"));
  value = value.divide(new BigInteger("10"));
}
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Fix compiler errors. Here. . while (value.compareTo(new BigInteger("0")) == 1) . . .AND . . .sum += value.remainder(new BigInteger("10")).intValue(); –  Adeel Ansari Dec 18 '08 at 10:12
    
The contract of Comparable.compareTo() states that compareTo() should return values less than, equal to, or greather than 0. Even though BigInteger’s javadoc says it returns 1 you really should check for > 0. –  Bombe Dec 18 '08 at 10:38
    
I actually think Bombe's solution is more elegant. It should even be a lot faster than mine. –  soulmerge Dec 18 '08 at 10:48
    
To soulmerge, The good thing I found here, is no obvious use of char and String. I said 'obvious' because I haven't checked BigInteger source. To Bombe, good point. I agree. Thanks. –  Adeel Ansari Dec 19 '08 at 2:19
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Alternatively, you could grab a double and manipulate its bits. With numbers that are the power of 2, you won't have truncation errors. Then you can convert it to string.

Having that said, it's still a brute-force approach. There must be a nice, mathematical way to make it without actually generating a number.

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In[1162] := Plus @@ IntegerDigits[2^1000]
Out[1162] = 1366
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3  
What language is this? –  jpalecek Oct 13 '11 at 21:13
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