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ok, I have the following, very simple code:

f = "String1\n\n\nString2\n\n\n"
f.each_line do |t|
  t.delete! "\n"
  puts t.inspect
end

It removes the \n, but leaves the spaces

"String1"
nil
nil
"String2"
nil
nil

I want it to look like this:

"String1"
"String2"

Thanks in advance for help.

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1  
Nope, it doesn't leave any spaces. It returns an empty string. What result are you looking for? –  Matchu Sep 22 '10 at 21:46
    
Are you sure the exact code you have produces nil in the output, rather than ""? It shouldn't be doing that. –  Andrew Grimm Feb 28 '11 at 0:16
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
f.squeeze("\n").each_line do |l|
  puts l
end
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Excellent answer! Thanks for the help –  nomoreflash Sep 22 '10 at 22:00
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You could split the string by \n, and then reject any blank lines:

f = "String1\n\n\nString2\n\n\n"
f.split("\n").reject { |i| i.empty? }
#=> ["String1", "String2"]

You'd end up with an Array that you can output as you'd like.

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Works very well. Thanks –  nomoreflash Sep 22 '10 at 22:00
    
can you split the string by nil? –  nomoreflash Sep 22 '10 at 22:34
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f = "String1\n\n\nString2\n\n\n"
f.each_line.collect(&:chomp).reject(&:empty?)
#=> ["String1", "String2"]

The collect(&:chomp) removes line endings. reject(&:empty?) throws away all of the empty lines.

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Thanks, will definitely have use for your input. –  nomoreflash Sep 22 '10 at 22:01
    
You're very kind. @jordinl's answer is clearly better. –  Wayne Conrad Sep 22 '10 at 22:34
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