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Does C++ offer a way to 'show' something visual if an unhandled exception occurs?

What I want to do is to make something like assert(unhandled exception.msg()) if it actually happens (like in the following sample):

void foo() {
   throw std::exception("Message!");
}

int main() {
 foo();
}

I expect this kind of code not to terminate immediately (because exception was unhandled), rather show custom assertion message (Message! actually).

Is that possible?

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3  
Why don't you just put a try/catch block in main? –  GManNickG Sep 22 '10 at 23:24
1  
@GMan: A global constructor or destructor can also throw outside main. For the destructor case, unwinding might not get to main. –  Potatoswatter Sep 23 '10 at 2:41
    
@Potatoswatter: Indeed, I was more concerned with his particular example though. –  GManNickG Sep 23 '10 at 3:52

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's no way specified by the standard to actually display the message of the uncaught exception. However, on many platforms, it is possible anyway. On Windows, you can use SetUnhandledExceptionFilter and pull out the C++ exception information. With g++ (appropriate versions of anyway), the terminate handler can access the uncaught exception with code like:

   void terminate_handler()
   {
       try { throw; }
       catch(const std::exception& e) { log(e.what()); }
       catch(...) {}
   }

and indeed g++'s default terminate handler does something similar to this. You can set the terminate handler with set_terminate.

IN short, no there's no generic C++ way, but there are ways depending on your platform.

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I like this. The standard might not specifically require it, but it does say an exception is only deactivated when the block catching it exits. Since that can't happen before terminate, this should be portable or at least forward-compatible to everything eventually. The same trick should work with unexpected, and that would allow a diagnostic for illegal throw-on-unwind. –  Potatoswatter Sep 23 '10 at 2:38
    
Also, it can catch exceptions thrown from global constructors and destructors, which a catch block in main can't. –  Potatoswatter Sep 23 '10 at 2:39
    
@Potatoswatter I've seen at least one setup where this trick doesn't really work, I don't claim to be knowledgeable enough about the standard (and the other things we were doing with exception handling) to say one way or the other, but I know it works on Linux with a modernish gcc. –  Logan Capaldo Sep 23 '10 at 2:45
    
I also found that there were situations that you could get into terminate w/o there being an exception, so I used abi::__cxa_current_exception_type to find out if there was one before trying to rethrow it, and obviously that's a non-portable gccism. –  Logan Capaldo Sep 23 '10 at 2:47
    
No, I wouldn't expect it to be portable as a practical matter in the current timeframe. Well, if you also set an unexpected handler, then the rethrow just translates the terminate into an unexpected. You can add some logic to continue along the appropriate handler chain (i.e. unexpected calls the replaced terminate handler) and the rest of the program is none the wiser, right? –  Potatoswatter Sep 23 '10 at 3:21

Microsoft Visual C++ allows you to hook unhandled C++ exceptions like this. This is standard STL behaviour.

You set a handler via a call to set_terminate. It's recommended that your handler do not very much work, and then terminate the program, but I don't see why you could not signal something via an assert - though you don't have access to the exception that caused the problem.

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1  
The terminate handler shouldn't assert. It might printf (or better, just write(2) to STDERR_FILENO), though, and call the terminate_handler it replaced. Also, see Logan's answer and discussion for why the exception should still be accessible at that point. –  Potatoswatter Sep 23 '10 at 3:23
    
@Potatoswatter - is your statement applicable in all circumstances - in other words would it be possible to assert, but not recommended? Thanks. –  Steve Townsend Sep 23 '10 at 10:37
    
It's always possible to assert, but any of the handler functions are recommended to tail-call the previously installed handler. –  Potatoswatter Sep 24 '10 at 0:24
    
@Potatoswatter - thanks –  Steve Townsend Sep 24 '10 at 0:41

I think you would benefit from a catch-all statement as follows:

int main() {
 try {
   foo();
 catch (...) {
   // Do something with the unhandled exception.
 }
}
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4  
It's worth noting that the exception itself is not available for introspection in this method. That's because you might not be throwing a std::exception instance, C++ permits you to throw any type of value, such as an int or whatever. You can get around this by also having a catch (std::exception &e) before the catch (...), or any type you might wish to catch. –  IfLoop Sep 22 '10 at 23:36
    
A good point indeed. –  Christopher Hunt Sep 22 '10 at 23:44
    
On Windows you have to be a little careful with the (...) catching structured exception thrown internally (ex. access violations). It may be dangerous to continue execution under conditions like these. –  seand Sep 23 '10 at 2:19
    
It's probably not possible to continue execution with this method regardless of what exception occured. This catches the exception only after the stack has been completely unrolled all the way up to main(). At that point, you may as well exec(argv[0]). –  IfLoop Sep 23 '10 at 2:37

If you are using Windows, a good library for handling unhandled exceptions and crashes is CrashRpt. If you want to do it manually you can also use the following I wrote in this answer.

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+1 for more expansive answer to a narrow q –  Steve Townsend Sep 23 '10 at 0:07

If I'm reading your question correctly, you're asking if you can overload throw (changing its default behavior) so it does something user-defined. No, you can't.

Edit: since you're insistent :), here's a bad idea™:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <windows.h>

void monkey() {
   throw std::exception("poop!");
}

LONG WINAPI MyUnhandledExceptionFilter(struct _EXCEPTION_POINTERS *lpTopLevelExceptionFilter) {
    std::cout << "poop was thrown!" << std::endl;
    return EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER;
  }

int main() {
    SetUnhandledExceptionFilter(&MyUnhandledExceptionFilter);
    monkey();
    return 1;
}

Again, this is a very bad idea, and it's obviously platform-dependent, but it works.

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Not throw actually. I want to change default behaviour when an unhandled exception situation occurs. –  Yippie-Ki-Yay Sep 22 '10 at 23:24
    
So basically, when you throw an unhandled exception :-P –  David Titarenco Sep 22 '10 at 23:27

Yes, its possible. Here you go:

#include <iostream>
#include <exception>

void foo() 
{
   throw std::exception("Message!");
}

int main() 
{
  try
  {
    foo();
  }
  catch (std::exception& e)
  {
    std::cout << "Got exception: " << e.what() << std::endl;
  }

  return 0;
}
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The c++ standard is the terminate handler - as other have said

If you are after better traceablility for throws then this is what we do

We have a macro Throw that logs the file name and line number and message and then throws. It takes a printf style varargs message.

Throw(proj::FooException, "Fingle %s unable to process bar %d", fingle.c_str(), barNo);

I get a nice log message

Throw FooException from nargle.cpp:42 Fingle barf is unable to process bar 99
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1  
There are two issues with this. First, it adds additional processing to exceptions that are caught. This isn't much of a problem because if it happens enough that the overhead (or noise in the log) is a problem, you shouldn't be using exceptions for that case anyway. The second issue is a more practical concern. When exception conditions happen, the extra processing might fail as well. Preallocating buffers for error messages can help, but ultimately you need to make sure to protect against failure during error reporting. –  Ben Voigt Sep 23 '10 at 0:15
    
since its me throwing (not the runtime) I am not in catastrophic (no memory, no stack , dead heap) mode, so the handler works. If not then I am dead anyway. I use this technique in very large commercial enterprise products (100s kloc) - with no problem. I can tune the logging level to supress overhead –  pm100 Sep 23 '10 at 0:25

If you're really interested in what happened to cause your program to fail, you might benefit from examining the process image in a post-mortem debugger. The precise technique varies a bit from OS to OS, but the basic train is to first enable core dumping, and compile your program with debug symbols on. Once the program crashes, the operating system will copy its memory to disk, and you can then examine the state of the program at the time it crashed.

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