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I have a function that I use to get a "quick look" at a data.frame... I deal with a lot of survey data and this acts as a quick tool to see what's what.

f.table <- function(x) {

    if (is.factor(x[[1]])) { 
        frequency <- function(x) {
            x <- round(length(x)/n, digits=2)
        }
        x <- na.omit(melt(x,c()))
        x <- cast(x, variable ~ value, frequency)
        x <- cbind(x,top2=x[,ncol(x)]+x[,ncol(x)-1], bottom=x[,2])
    }

    if (is.numeric(x[[1]])) {
        frequency <- function(x) { 
            x[x > 1] <- 1
            x[is.na(x)] <- 0
            x <- round(sum(x)/n, digits=2) 
            } 

        x <- na.omit(melt(x))
        x <- cast(x, variable ~ ., c(frequency, mean, sd, min, max))
        x <- transform(x, variable=reorder(variable, frequency))
    }

return(x) 
}

What I find happens is that if I don't define "frequency" outside of the function, it returns wonky results for data frames with continuous variables. It doesn't seem to matter which definition I use outside of the function, so long as I do.

try:

n <- 100    
x <- data.frame(a=c(1:25),b=rnorm(100),c=rnorm(100))
x[x > 20] <- NA 

Now, select either one of the frequency functions and paste them in and try it again:

frequency <- function(x) {
                x <- round(length(x)/n, digits=2)
            }
f.table(x)

Why is that?

share|improve this question
    
you might want to look into the R package reporttools, which i believe was written exactly for the purpose you have outlined –  Ramnath Sep 23 '10 at 2:55
    
Actually, I use this function on an almost daily basis to prepare data for plotting. The one that you referred to is helpful but well beyond the scope of this particular need. –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 23 '10 at 3:41
    
Brandon, what do you want the function to do? At the moment, you are passing is a data frame, which if the first component is a factor only do something with it, but if the first component is a numeric do something with the entire data frame. Without knowing what you want to do, it is a bit difficult to provide an answer that solves the problem. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 23 '10 at 8:08
    
I'm not sure if I understand your question? What I want from the function is exactly what it does. It returns frequencies, means, sd, min and max of a data frame of continuous variables OR returns the frequencies of a dataframe with factored variables. What I don't understand is why it doesn't work if I don't define frequency outside of the function. –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 23 '10 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Crucially, I think this is where your problem is. cast() is evaluating those functions without reference to the function it was called from. Inside cast() it evaluates fun.aggregate via funstofun and, although I don't really follow what it is doing, is getting stats:::frequency and not your local one.

Hence my comment to your Q. What do you wan the function to do? At the moment it would seem necessary to define a "frequency" function in the global environment so that cast() or funstofun() finds it. Give it a unique name so it is unlikely to clash with anything so it should be the only thing found, say .Frequency(). Without knowing what you want to do with the function (rather than what you thought the function [f.table] should do) it is a bit difficult to provide further guidance, but why not have .FrequencyNum() and .FrequencyFac() defined in the global workspace and rewrite your f.table() wrapper calls to cast to use the relevant one?

.FrequencyFac <- function(X, N) {
    round(length(X)/N, digits=2)
}

.FrequencyNum <- function(X, N) {
    X[X > 1] <- 1
    X[is.na(X)] <- 0
    round(sum(X)/N, digits=2)
}
f.table <- function(x, N) {
    if (is.factor(x[[1]])) {
        x <- na.omit(melt(x, c()))
        x <- dcast(x, variable ~ value, .FrequencyFac, N = N)
        x <- cbind(x,top2=x[,ncol(x)]+x[,ncol(x)-1], bottom=x[,2])
    }

    if (is.numeric(x[[1]])) {
        x <- na.omit(melt(x))
        x <- cast(x, variable ~ ., c(.FrequencyNum, mean, sd, min, max), N = N)
        ##x <- transform(x, variable=reorder(variable, frequency))
        ## left this out as I wanted to see what cast returned
    }
return(x) 
}

Which I thought would work, but it is not finding N, and it should be. So perhaps I am missing something here?

By the way, it is probably not a good idea to rely on function that find n (in your version) from outside the function. Always pass in the variables you need as arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
This really seems like a bug in funstofun. If fun.aggregate is of length 1 you get the expected behavior. That's because funstofun takes only the match.call() as the argument rather than the evaluated value of the argument. Maybe the right fix is to change funstofun to take in evaluated named arguments and move the deparse to the call site. –  Jonathan Chang Sep 23 '10 at 8:55
    
It's more like that cast should capture the parent.frame() in which it is called and pass that along to ensure the functions are evaluated in the correct environment. Programming with dynamic scope in R is very tricky to get right. –  hadley Sep 23 '10 at 18:01
    
@hadley: With my version of f.table, am I doing something wrong in expecting N to be passed on to the fun.aggregate functions? Or is this caught up in why Brandon's original version isn't working as well; a scoping issue? –  Gavin Simpson Sep 24 '10 at 10:05
    
I've found a number of other questions like this where scoping is problematic. I think I'm going to stick with what works and close it down for now. The why, seems to be "functions within functions are bad ideas in R" –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 28 '10 at 18:28
    
@Brandon; I don't think that functions within functions are the problem, per se. The issue is that you are embedding a fairly high-level function within another function. You need to fully comprehend how the high-level functions does it's job to know whether the function-within-function will work or not. Unfortunately, as Hadley notes above, it is difficult to write these high-level functions in R. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 28 '10 at 20:50

I don't have the package that contains melt, but there are a couple potential issues I can see:

  1. Your frequency functions do not return anything.
  2. It's generally bad practice to alter function inputs (x is the input and the output).
  3. There is already a generic frequency function in stats package in base R, which may cause issues with method dispatch (I'm not sure).
share|improve this answer
1  
1) Is not correct, Joshua, they do return something; the last expression evaluated. foo <- function(x) x <- round(x); bar <- foo(runif(10)); bar –  Gavin Simpson Sep 23 '10 at 7:46
    
@ucfagis: I was not suggesting the functions did not return a value. I was saying they did not use the return function. I don't know why I thought (1) could be a problem (it was late in the day for me). –  Joshua Ulrich Sep 23 '10 at 11:35
    
It's from Hadley's reshape package. –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 23 '10 at 15:25

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