Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why will my script now work correctly?

I follow a YouTube video and worked for the guy.

I am running Perl on Windows using ActiveState ActivePerl 5.12.2.1202

Here is my tiny tiny code block.

print "What is your name?\n";
$name = <STDIN>;
if ($name eq "Jon") {
print "We have met before!\n";
} else {
print "We have not met before.\n";
}

The code automatically jumps to the else statement and does not even check the if statement.

share|improve this question
2  
Of course it checks the if statement. That's a ridiculous assertion to make. –  Wooble Sep 23 '10 at 3:14
2  
Adding to Wooble: in general, and particularly when learning a language, when the language seems to be making a mistake, its probably you who are –  Eric Strom Sep 23 '10 at 3:39
    
a good way to test for something like this (where an obviously true assertion is false) is to check your arguments, in this case, the statement print "'$name'\n"; before your if statement would have shown you the problem immediately –  Eric Strom Sep 23 '10 at 3:45
2  
Which youtube video? Maybe someone needs a LART. –  brian d foy Sep 23 '10 at 7:08
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The statement $name = <STDIN>; reads from standard input and includes the terminating newline character "\n". Remove this character using the chomp function:

print "What is your name?\n";
$name = <STDIN>;
chomp($name);
if ($name eq "Jon") {
  print "We have met before!\n";
} else {
  print "We have not met before.\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect answer, thank you. –  Solignis Sep 23 '10 at 16:11
add comment

The trick in programming is to know what your data are. When something's not acting like you expect, look at the data to see if they are what you expect. For instance:

 print "The name is [$name]\n";

You put the braces around it so you can see any extra whitespace that might be there. In this case, you would have seen:

The name is [Jon
]

That's your clue that there is extra stuff. Since the eq has to match exactly, it fails to match.

If you're just starting with Perl, try Learning Perl. It's much better than random videos from YouTube. :)

share|improve this answer
    
I will have to find that book, I already bought Perl for Dummies and Beginning Perl by Wrox press. –  Solignis Sep 23 '10 at 16:12
    
Don't use either of those. Not only are they ancient, but they are not a good way to learn Perl. If you want Beginning Perl, get the latest version from Apress, not the one from Wrox. –  brian d foy Sep 23 '10 at 16:26
    
Shoot I already purchased it and it is being shipped. Oh well, so you are saying Apress makes a better version that is newer? –  Solignis Sep 23 '10 at 18:33
    
Yes, the latest Apress version is by definition newer. It's also better. As general advice, don't buy old computer books. Buy the most recent ones. Not only should they cover more of the recent features, but good authors fix problems people found in the earlier versions. –  brian d foy Sep 23 '10 at 19:57
    
And, there is a list of good Perl books in the current perlfaq2 (and the future perlbook). –  brian d foy Sep 23 '10 at 19:57
add comment

When you read the name standard input as $name = <STDIN>;

$name will have a trailing newline. So if I enter foo , $name will actually have foo\n.

To get rid of this newline you an make use of the chomp function as:

chomp($name = <STDIN>);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.