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I have a nested function where I am trying to access variables assigned in the parent scope. From the first line of the next() function I can see that path, and nodes_done are assigned as expected. distance, current, and probability_left have no value and are causing a NameError to be thrown.

What am I doing wrong here? How can I access and modify the values of current, distance, and probability_left from the next() function?

def cheapest_path(self):
    path = []
    current = 0
    distance = 0
    nodes_done = [False for _ in range(len(self.graph.nodes))]
    probability_left = sum(self.graph.probabilities)

    def next(dest):
        log('next: %s -> %s distance(%.2f), nodes_done(%s), probability_left(%.2f)' % (distance,self.graph.nodes[current],self.graph.nodes[dest],str(nodes_done),probability_left))
        path.append((current, distance, nodes_done, probability_left))

        probability_left -= self.graph.probabilities[current]
        nodes_done[current] = True
        distance = self.graph.shortest_path[current][dest]
        current = dest

    def back():
        current,nodes_done,probability_left = path.pop()
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way Python's nested scopes work, you can never assign to a variable in the parent scope, unless it's global (via the global keyword). This changes in Python 3 (with the addition of nonlocal), but with 2.x you're stuck.

Instead, you have to sort of work around this by using a datatype which is stored by reference:

def A():
    foo = [1]
    def B():
        foo[0] = 2 # since foo is a list, modifying it here modifies the referenced list

Note that this is why your list variables work - they're stored by reference, and thus modifying the list modifies the original referenced list. If you tried to do something like path = [] inside your nested function, it wouldn't work because that would be actually assigning to path (which Python would interpret as creating a new local variable path inside the nested function that shadows the parent's path).

One option that is sometimes used is to just keep all of the things that you want to persist down into the nested scope in a dict:

def A():
    state = {
        'path': [],
        'current': 0,
        # ...
    }

    def B():
        state['current'] = 3
share|improve this answer
    
+1. In this particular case though, I'd suggest using a dict instead of a list for clarity's sake. – Cameron Sep 23 '10 at 3:26
    
@Cameron I was actually just adding a note about that. :P – Amber Sep 23 '10 at 3:28
    
I thought this might be the case, but was making sure I wasn't missing something in the language – spoon16 Sep 23 '10 at 3:51
    
This is incorrect: the nonlocal keyword allows writing to variables in an outer but non-global scope. It's unfortunately only available in Python 3, which is a bit inexplicable as I believe this is purely a syntax issue and doesn't even require additional VM support; but it's there. It really needs to be backported to 2.x, as it'll be years before most people will be using 3.x... – Glenn Maynard Sep 23 '10 at 5:06
1  
@Glenn: The vast majority of Python users are on 2.x; thus it typically makes sense to give the answer that applies to that version. – Amber Sep 23 '10 at 6:42

The short answer is that python does not have proper lexical scoping support. If it did, there would have to be more syntax to support the behavior (i.e. a var/def/my keyword to declare the variable scope).

Barring actual lexical scoping, the best you can do is store the data in an environment data structure. One simple example would be a list, e.g.:

def cheapest_path(self):
    path = []
    path_info = [0, 0]
    nodes_done = [False for _ in range(len(self.graph.nodes))]
    probability_left = sum(self.graph.probabilities)

    def next(dest):
        distance, current = path_info
        log('next: %s -> %s distance(%.2f), nodes_done(%s), probability_left(%.2f)' %     (distance,self.graph.nodes[current],self.graph.nodes[dest],str(nodes_done),probability_left))
        path.append((current, distance, nodes_done, probability_left))

        probability_left -= self.graph.probabilities[current]
        nodes_done[current] = True
        path_info[0] = self.graph.shortest_path[current][dest]
        path_info[1] = dest

    def back():
        current,nodes_done,probability_left = path.pop()

You can do this or do inspect magic. For more history on this read this thread.

share|improve this answer
    
You'd also need to modify probability_left. In addition, it'd probably be better to use a dict rather than a list, because [0] and [1] are far less descriptive than ['current'] and ['distance']. – Amber Sep 23 '10 at 3:29

If you happen to be working with Python 3, you can use the nonlocal statement (documentation) to make those variables exist in the current scope, e.g.:

def next(dest):
    nonlocal distance, current, probability_left
    ...
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