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I know the concepts of bit-wise operators, bit manipulation, 2's complement etc. But when it comes to solving something using bit manipulation it does not strike me. I takes me time to wrap my head around them.

I thought it would help if I looked at some questions regarding bit operators/bit manipulation but it left me even more confused as to how to approach this topic. I am not looking for an answer to a specific problem but a generalized approach / mindset while tackling bit manipulation. Thanks.

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closed as too broad by Gabe Sechan, Rohan, M4N, DNA, Emissary Jul 19 at 20:16

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I'd say specific problems require specific approaches... –  EboMike Sep 23 '10 at 6:41
    
do they ask these questions at interviews? if yes, which ones? –  Dann Sep 23 '10 at 6:42
2  
You can take a look at this list for some interesting applications of bit maniplutaions: cs.utk.edu/~vose/c-stuff/bithacks.html –  Naveen Sep 23 '10 at 6:43
    
You can also look back through some of the many good answers to questions about bitwise operations right here on SO. –  Paul R Sep 23 '10 at 6:50
    
I would say practice makes perfect. You can practise bitwise problems at graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html –  SiLent SoNG Oct 6 '10 at 10:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Answers given so far are nowhere near useful. But the link given by Naveen helped me a bit. Quite a lot of examples given here. I am trying to learn from them. Maybe it'll help others.

Bit Hacks

UPDATE: I have been going through the examples given in the link above. They were good. Also I stumbled on - Resource for Bitwise Programming link in SO. Excellent Resource. After going through all those resources I feel bitwise programming is easy! Never thought I would use that in a sentence :)

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1  
Looks like your linked page was relocated. Forbidden. The site links to this: http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html –  Jeff Mercado Oct 6 '10 at 11:20
    
@Jeff. Yupp! Thanks. Updated the post too! –  Srikar Appal Oct 6 '10 at 11:24

I divine your question to be:

What approach should I take, and what mindset should I adopt, when tackling problems involving bit manipulation ?

If that is correct, read on, if not, stop now ...

Bit manipulation is a difficult topic for the beginner such as me. I will have to concentrate hard and pay careful attention as I work through a graded set of sample problems. I will revise what I learn at regular intervals.

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So what exactly are you looking for, this looks kind of vague to me to be honest. Have you ever read a book about for example C? You could look up some code examples on how to approach some standard programming solutions in C perhaps.

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I learned a lot about this by writing my own compact, cross-platform binary protocol for sending object messages over a stream (suck as a network socket).

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But when it comes to solving something using bit manipulation it does not strike me

"Think a C variable as a binary string, and data is represented by this binary string"

I built an example program that illustrates operations on bits in a very simple manner, I started with this example to manipulate certain bits of variables and to realize the changes made with the helper function dec2bin(number, size_of_the_data).

We can learn very easy, bit operations using illustrative binary part of the variable (data). For example if we have a variable character (char) which contains the ASCII character 'b' to make to a capital character 'B', we will need to manipulate bit number 6 (remember that type char has 8 bits available (depends on system architecture)) from 1 to 0, a first in mind operation is expressed as c xor 0x20 (for C language expression will be c ^ = 0x20);

Explanation:

b - 0110 0010 - to uppercase B - 0100 0010 (how?)

We will need to handle bit number six which is set to true (lowercase) to false which will translate content of variable to a capital character. Looking at truth tables AND, OR, XOR, NOT the truth table which we will choose will be XOR truth table because of logical theory property 1 xor 1 result in 0 bit value, in C this operation is expresed as ^. What about 0x20 is a hexadecimal mask in binary (2) 0010 0000 (0), that expression represent 0110 0010 xor 0010 0000 => 0100 0010 is a capital character 'B'. We will observe that capital character 'B' xor mask will result in a lowercase character 'b'.

Playing with this program we will find that bitwise operations are very easy to understand.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void dec2bin(signed long long int, unsigned short size);

int main()
{
    signed long long int packedData = 0xABC4F0DE;

    signed long long int testData = -0xFF;
    dec2bin(testData, sizeof(signed long long int));

    /*
     *  NOTE:
     *  -----
     *  All printed instructions are virtually and are garbage
     *  instructions (not used anywhere in programming).
     *  That instructions are supposed to make current operation visible.
     */
    //Garbage data (random which calls for a global complex subroutine)
    printf("Istruction  1: [RND [__global__]     ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(unsigned long int));

    // NULL the data - CLR (clear all bits from data)
    // CLR is calling a sobroutine composed with AND 0x0 mask;
    packedData &= 0x0;
    printf("Istruction  2: [CLR [AND 0x0]        ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Adding 0x3A (0011 1010) to packed data
    packedData |= 0x3A;
    printf("Istruction  3: [OR  0x3A             ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift to the left this data to next nibble
    packedData <<= 4;
    printf("Istruction  4: [SHL 0x4              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift again to the left this data to next nibble
    packedData <<= 4;
    printf("Istruction  5: [SHL 0x4              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Adding 0xF (1111) to packed data
    packedData |= 0xF;
    printf("Istruction  6: [OR  0xF              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift again to the left this data to next byte (2 * nibble)
    packedData <<= 8;
    printf("Istruction  7: [SHL 0x8              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Extract contents of low ordered nibble from second byte (with a mask)
    packedData &= 0x00000F00;
    printf("Istruction  8: [AND 0x00000F00       ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Invert (negate|NAND) each bit from data (invert mask)
    packedData = ~packedData;
    printf("Istruction  9: [INV [NOT XXXXXXXX]   ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift to the right this data to previous nibble
    packedData >>= 4;
    printf("Istruction 10: [SHR 0x4              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift to the right this data to previous nibble
    packedData >>= 4;
    printf("Istruction 11: [SHR 0x4              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift to the right this data to previous nibble
    packedData >>= 2;
    printf("Istruction 12: [SHR 0x2              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Invert (negate|NAND) each bit from data (invert mask)
    packedData = ~(packedData) & 0x00FFFFFF;
    printf("Istruction 13: [INV [NAND 0x00FFFFFF]] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Adding 0xF0000000 (1111 0000 ... 0000) to packed data
    packedData |= 0xF0000000;
    printf("Istruction 14: [OR  0xF0000000       ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Shift to the left this data to next nibble
    packedData <<= 4;
    printf("Istruction 15: [SHL 0x4              ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    // Exclusive or
    packedData ^= 0x0F0000F0;
    printf("Istruction 16: [XOR 0x0F0000F0       ] ");
    dec2bin(packedData, sizeof(signed long int));

    return 0;
}

void dec2bin(signed long long int number, unsigned short size)
{
    int c, k;
    for (c = (size*8)-1; c >= 0; c--)
    {
        k = number >> c;
        if (k & 1)
            printf("1");
        else
            printf("0");
        if (c % 4 == 0)
            printf(" ");
    }
    printf("\n");
}
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