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Say I want something like this in Rails:

class Proposal < ActiveRecord::Base
    def interest_level
        self.yes_votes.count - self.no_votes.count
    end

  private
    def yes_votes
        self.votes.where(:vote => true)
    end

    def no_votes
        self.votes.where(:vote => false)
    end
end
  1. What have I basically done wrong in the code above? (I realize it's probably terrible in numerous ways.)
  2. What's the correct way to do this from a Rails standpoint?
  3. What considerations should I be mindful of from a database standpoint? (e.g., even if code like the above were possible, I'm guessing it would be excessive on the DB side. But naturally I'm not really sure.)
share|improve this question
    
Are you specifically asking for Rails 3 ( I took cue from .where )? – Swanand Sep 23 '10 at 8:07

class Proposal < ActiveRecord::Base

def interest_level
    self.votes.sum('votes', :conditions => {:votes = true}) - self.votes.sum('votes', :conditions => {:votes = false})
end

end

thanks, Anubhaw

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't make much sense. In fact I think it won't even work, it would generate, if rails allowed it, two queries like this: SELECT SUM(votes) FROM votes WHERE votes = true AND proposal_id = .. Which would fail (no column named votes). The method in the question would generate the correct SQL: SELECT count(1) FROM votes WHERE vote = true AND proposal_id = .. – Daniel Beardsley Sep 23 '10 at 16:46

I don't really see anything overtly wrong with your code. Though there are a number of ways to accomplish what you seem to be trying to do, your method seems like it should work fine (though I have limited experience with Arel).

Another way to go about this might be simply changing the interest_level method:

def interest_level
    self.votes.count - self.no_votes.count * 2  # same as (total - no_votes) - no_votes
end

The above might be slightly quicker, though I highly doubt it will make much difference, count queries are pretty fast on indexed columns, and your version of that method is easier to read

share|improve this answer

Considering the database loading i recommend to implement a custom counter cache. I would do like this:

class Vote < ActiveRecord::Base

    def after_create
      self.update_counter_cache
    end

    def after_destroy
      self.update_counter_cache
    end

    def update_counter_cache
      self.proposal.yes_votes_count = self.proposal.votes.where(:vote=>true)
      self.proposal.no_votes_count = self.proposal.votes.where(:vote=>false)
      self.propsal.save
    end
end

Please note, you have to add two columns to your Proposal model.

add_columns_migration.rb

add_column :proposals, :yes_votes_count, :integer
add_column :proposals, :no_votes_count, :integer
share|improve this answer
    
This would work, but it's more complex, more prone to failure, and its performance relative to the method in the question would be based on how often votes are updated or changed. Adding votes or changing them using this method would incur a larger cost. – Daniel Beardsley Sep 23 '10 at 16:49
    
Yes definitely involves larger cost, but I think the cost is still smaller than doing two join queries on each page load. Also the good solution depends on your needs, how you should change a vote, or create. – dombesz Sep 24 '10 at 9:36

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