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I'm trying to define my own exception class the easiest way, and this is what I'm getting:

public class MyException extends Exception {}

public class Foo {
  public bar() throws MyException {
    throw new MyException("try again please");
  }
}

This is what Java compiler says:

cannot find symbol: constructor MyException(java.lang.String)

I had a feeling that this constructor has to be inherited from java.lang.Exception, isn't it?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 146 down vote accepted

No, you don't "inherit" non-default constructors, you need to define the one taking a String in your class. Typically you use super(message) in your constructor to invoke your parent constructor. For example, like this:

public class MyException extends Exception {
    public MyException(String message) {
        super(message);
    }
}
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the default constructor IS inherited. –  vulkanino Sep 23 '10 at 7:55
24  
@vulkanino: No. The default constructor is added by the compiler for every class that defines no constructor of its own. If you define an explicit constructor, you don't get the default even if the superclass has it, and if your class has no constructor, you get the default even if the superclass does not have it. –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 23 '10 at 8:10
3  
if your class has no constructor, you get the default even if the superclass does not have it The last part is impossible, unless the superclass has a default constructor that is accessible to this class (may be protected or package-protected). Otherwise you must explicitly call one of the parent constructors, or compilation will fail. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 23 '10 at 8:39
10  
Please add the MyException(Throwable) and MyException(String, Throwable) constructors to properly support exceptions chaining. –  Danilo Piazzalunga Sep 18 '13 at 13:13

A typical custom exception I'd define is something like this:

public class CustomException extends Exception {

    public CustomException(String message) {
        super(message);
    }

    public CustomException(String message, Throwable throwable) {
        super(message, throwable);
    }

}

I even create a template using Eclipse so I don't have to write all the stuff over and over again.

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2  
You can just extend Exception when creating your Class in Eclipse and you'll get all four constructors. You don't need a template. –  jeremyjjbrown Jan 9 at 3:41

Reason for this is explained in the Inheritance article of the Java Platform which says:

"A subclass inherits all the members (fields, methods, and nested classes) from its superclass. Constructors are not members, so they are not inherited by subclasses, but the constructor of the superclass can be invoked from the subclass."

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package customExceptions;

public class MyException extends Exception{

    public MyException(String exc)
    {
        super(exc);
    }
    public String getMessage()
    {
        return super.getMessage();
    }
}

import customExceptions.MyException;;

public class UseCustomException {

    MyException newExc=new MyException("This is a custom exception");

    public UseCustomException() throws MyException
    {
        System.out.println("Hello Back Again with custom exception");
        throw newExc;       
}

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        try
        {
            UseCustomException use=new UseCustomException();
        }
        catch(MyException my)
        {
            System.out.println("This is my custom exception:"+my.getMessage());
        }
    }
}
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what would this return? –  user1876508 Aug 21 '13 at 17:52
    
It would just print out "Hello Back Again with custom exception" which is from the constructor for UseCusomException, the exception would be thrown then caught in the main which would print out "This is my custom exception:This is a custom exception". –  NutterzUK Jul 18 at 13:11
    
How could this answer have +8?! –  sp00m Jul 24 at 12:24

If you use the new class dialog in Eclipse you can just set the Superclass field to java.lang.Exception and check "Constructors from superclass" and it will generate the following:

package com.example.exception;

public class MyException extends Exception {

    public MyException() {
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }

    public MyException(String message) {
        super(message);
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }

    public MyException(Throwable cause) {
        super(cause);
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }

    public MyException(String message, Throwable cause) {
        super(message, cause);
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }

}
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Exception class has two constructors

  • public Exception() -- This constructs an Exception without any additional information.Nature of the exception is typically inferred from the class name.
  • public Exception(String s) -- Constructs an exception with specified error message.A detail message is a String that describes the error condition for this particular exception.
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2  
Actually, since Java 1.4, there are two more constructors: public Exception(Throwable) and public Exception(String, Throwable). They are needed to properly support exceptions chaining. –  Danilo Piazzalunga Sep 18 '13 at 13:12
    
@DaniloPiazzalunga agree with you . source : Constructor Summary docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Exception.html –  KNU May 27 at 5:53

If you inherit from Exception, you have to provide a constructor that takes a String as a parameter (it will contain the error message).

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I think you should add reason also. –  Jigar Joshi Sep 23 '10 at 8:08
1  
actually, that is incorrect. If your code uses a constructor with one String argument, then you have to declare it. However, an Exception subclass can be defined with no explicit constructors ... because Exception has a no-args constructor. –  Stephen C Sep 23 '10 at 8:26

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