Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am surprised to see that IS NULL and =NULL are yielding different results in a select query. What is difference between them? When to use what. I would be glad if you can explain me in detail.

share|improve this question
1  
Check out the wikipedia article for additional information. –  Jeff Mercado Sep 23 '10 at 10:11
    
Thanku very much for all your responses! –  satya Sep 23 '10 at 11:27
    
This is a dup of a number of questions: stackoverflow.com/questions/1843451/… –  Paddy Sep 23 '10 at 11:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

= NULL is always unknown (this is piece of 3 state logic), but WHERE clause treats it as false and drops from the result set. So for NULL you should use IS NULL

Reasons are described here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1843451/why-does-null-null-evaluate-to-false-in-sql-server

share|improve this answer
2  
It is not false. It is unknown. If it was false then NOT(X = NULL) would be true. This is not the case. SQL uses 3 valued logic. –  Martin Smith Sep 23 '10 at 12:15
    
@Martin Smith i know about 3 state logic. but WHERE clause treats unknown as false and drop off from result set. –  Andrey Sep 23 '10 at 12:25

To add to existing answers, it depends whether you have ANSI_NULLS on or not, when using "= NULL".

-- This will print TRUE
SET ANSI_NULLS OFF;
IF NULL = NULL
    PRINT 'TRUE'
ELSE
    PRINT 'FALSE'

-- This will print FALSE
SET ANSI_NULLS ON;
IF NULL = NULL
    PRINT 'TRUE'
ELSE
    PRINT 'FALSE'
share|improve this answer

because of the three-valued-logic of SQL:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_%28SQL%29#Three-valued_logic_.283VL.29

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For being the only answer to mention this. –  Martin Smith Sep 23 '10 at 12:18

In MSSQL IS NULL is the way to say what you want. = NULL is pretty much never what you mean (and it's really anoying some times).

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't actually answer the question... why is IS NULL the right way and why is = NULL never what you mean (or annoying)? –  Dave Downs Sep 23 '10 at 10:07

You should take a look at this article

NULL Comparison Search Conditions

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.